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Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

5 Signs Of Prediabetes That Are Easy To Overlook

Prediabetes is a new word for a fast-rising problem around the world. It’s a diagnosis made when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be called diabetes. “Prediabetes is this kind of grey zone,” says Dr. Stewart Harris, a professor in family medicine at the University of Western Ontario’s Schulich School of Medicine who specializes in diabetes. “Your body is metabolically losing the ability to manage blood sugars after eating, and they start to creep up.” As many as six million Canadians can be considered to have prediabetes. The trouble is, many of them don’t know it. Prediabetes often has no symptoms at all. Yet if these people don’t take steps to control their blood sugar now, a diagnosis of diabetes within the next few years is highly likely. Could you have prediabetes? Here are five signs that you might. 1. You’re in a high-risk group for type 2 diabetes. Researchers have identified certain people who are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. These folks are also at risk for prediabetes. If you have a family history of diabetes or an Aboriginal, South Asian, Asian, African or Hispanic background, you’re at higher risk for prediabetes. Other risk factors include being older than 45 and having a sedentary lifestyle. 2. You have a health problem linked to prediabetes. The condition of your body can sometimes point to high blood sugar. If you’re overweight or obese’that is, if your body mass index is over 25’you could have prediabetes. Same goes for having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease or polycystic ovarian syndrome. If you had gestational diabetes, or diabetes diagnosed when you were pregnant, you could develop prediabetes after the baby’s born. 3. You have classic diabetes symptoms Continue reading >>

Why The Blue Circle?

Why The Blue Circle?

I can't quite remember who asked me, but in front of San Francisco City Hall last Friday evening, during our World Diabetes Day celebrations, somebody pointed to my pin and asked, "Why the blue circle, anyway? What does that mean?" They also wanted to know why the logo didn't have the world "diabetes" stamped across it: "Who's going to recognize that this stands for diabetes?!" For goodness' sake, it's supposed to be like the ubiquitous pink ribbon for breast cancer, red ribbon for AIDS, or yellow ribbon for bring-home-the-troops. Setting the issue of why it's blue and a circle aside for a moment, can't we all agree that a symbol that speaks for itself is better than having to pin the word "DIABETES" on your lapel? I was especially surprised to discover that folks from the local chapter of the ADA (American Diabetes Association) weren't at all familiar with the blue circle campaign. I sort of forgave them for it last year, since it was still very new then, but now I'm thinking that that group — and this country at large, which doesn't play up World Diabetes Day a fraction as much as the rest of the world — may be suffering from some classic "not invented here syndrome." When you go to the ADA's website right now, for example, you see "American Diabetes Month," but nada on WDD. I hereby proclaim this Call to Action for next year's WDD: Let's do it up, right, America! And that means you, ADA! And that means you, Mainstream Media! This awareness campaign is gaining traction, with the likes of T1 rockstar Nick Jonas on board, but it seems like we have a long way to go to catch up with the Brits, the Germans, or the Australians, for example. And now for the Why Blue? And Why a Circle? I know from my previous research that this symbol was the brainchild of Kari Rosenfeld Continue reading >>

Acanthosis Nigricans

Acanthosis Nigricans

Acanthosis nigricans (ah-kan-THO-sis NY-gruh-kans)is a skin condition. It causes thicker and darker patches or streaks around joints and body areas with many creases and folds (such as knuckles, armpits, elbows, knees, and the sides and back of the neck). Some people also develop acanthosis nigricans on their palms, groin, lips, or, in very rare cases, non-crease areas like the face, back, arms, or legs. The skin may stay soft, which is why the word "velvety" is often used to describe the symptoms of acanthosis nigricans. Acanthosis nigricans is not an infection and isn't contagious. A few kids might have mild itching, but otherwise acanthosis nigricans is harmless. Still, a doctor will run tests to rule out underlying causes that could require treatment. Managing acanthosis nigricans means treating the conditions that are causing the skin darkening. Acanthosis nigricans is most commonly found in children with high blood insulin levels, a condition often associated with kids who are overweight or obese or have diabetes . Sometimes acanthosis nigricans can be a warning sign of other more serious conditions, such as certain cancers and endocrine problems, along with type 2 diabetes and the health issues associated with obesity. In rare cases, acanthosis nigricans can be caused by certain medicines, such as oral contraceptives and cholesterol medicine.In some cases, it can be hereditary (passed on to a person by his or her parents). Usually, the only signs of acanthosis nigricanswill be dark, thick, velvety patches of skin in creases and folds, usually in the neck, armpits, or groin. But it's sometimes found in the lips, palms, knuckles, soles of the feet, and other areas. In rare cases, children may have mild itching in the affected areas. The patches of skin will usuall Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms In Women - Common Signs Of Diabetes In A Woman

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms In Women - Common Signs Of Diabetes In A Woman

Not exercising. Supersize portions. Our love affair with food has taken a drastic turn. The number of Americans with type 2 diabetes21 million, including adults and childrenhas risen with the obesity epidemic. Should you or you child get tested? Yes, if you have a family history of the disease and/or any of the following: Keep Your Heart Healthy Despite Type 2 Diabetes You're overweight. Even being just 10 to 15 pounds overweight can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If your child is overweight, make sure his pediatrician tests him, because type 2 diabetes is on the rise in kids. The encouraging news is that losing just 5% to 7% of your body weight can reduce your risk of diabetes, according to research from the Diabetes Prevention Program. Testing usually involves screening your blood for high glucose (sugar) levels. If they're too high, you could have either type 1 or type 2. (See box, right, for explanations of the two types.) Your doctor will most likely be able to sort it out based on your age and symptoms. In some cases, you may also need to see an endocrinologist (specialist). You're constantly running to the bathroom. "If your body doesn't make enough insulin [a hormone that carries glucose into your cells to give them energy]," which can happen with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, "glucose builds up in your bloodstream and comes out in your urine," explains Janet Silverstein, MD, chief of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida. Because you're urinating a lot, you'll probably also be very thirsty and drinking more than usual. Your vision is blurry. High blood sugar levels cause glucose to build up in the lens of your eyes, making it harder for you to focus. This could mean that you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. You're losing weight fo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

The Blue Ring | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

The Blue Ring | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I'm looking to get a tattoo on my inner left wrist to identify me as T1. I'm a diabetic drummer, so I'm thinking a blue ring incorporated into the rim of a snare drum (or something like that). My question is, how recognised is the blue ring by medics? The tattoo design would make the blue ring really stand out so it would be obvious, but would a paramedic see it and think 'Oh, look, he's diabetic'? novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member As a long term diabetic I can say that I am not familiar with it......although I am not heavily into the medical jewellery/tattoo thing... I have no idea about medics but as a type 2 I probably represent the general public when I say that the blue ring means nothing to me. If I remember correctly @therower has something more obvious. @Jeremy_Wood . You're correct in thinking that a blue circle is an international symbol for diabetes. Unfortunately it isn't overly popular and probably less well known. Personally I went for the Rod of Asclepius. This is an international recognised symbol for medical alert. It's often spotted on ambulances and a lot of other things involving medicine. A google search would probably give you a better insight. The symbol is not specific to diabetes, what people do is add relevant text. As my personal tattoo. Thanks guys, useful input. I'll do some more research before I make a decision. Well this is what I'm going for. Pretty unambiguous I think?... The other thing to be aware of is that medics may not pay att Continue reading >>

Ring The Alarm On Type 2 Diabetes!

Ring The Alarm On Type 2 Diabetes!

Type 2 Diabetes is becoming a growing problem across the nation. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) declared March 27th Diabetes Alert Day to raise awareness about your health risk. No matter the date that you are reading this, consider this your wakeup call! The ADA created a 60-second quiz to determine your risk for Type 2 Diabetes. An advantage to taking the quiz is to find out where you stand in order to take healthy steps to maintain or improve your health! Take the quiz here: . Knowledge is power: It can be scary to know your risk for a disease but the interesting thing about Diabetes or Prediabetes is that it responds well to ones lifestyle choices. This means we have a good deal of control over our health! Here are some tips that can help improve your health and prevent Type 2 Diabetes. Physical Activity: Walking is an example of something we can do daily to improve our health. Aerobic exercise helps lower our risk for diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Being active throughout the day or going for a brisk walk helps. Quit Smoking: Studies show smoking can increase risk for heart attack or stroke, which is concerning. Nutrition: A healthy balanced diet truly can reduce your risk for health issues including diabetes. Replace sugary or processed snacks with fruit and veggies. Eat balanced meals which includes lean protein, whole grains, and vegetables. Drink water and avoid sugary beverages. Start small: Create goals and stick to them. Decide to take control and aim to improve an area of your health. For more information about the ADAs Diabetes Alert information, visit . Continue reading >>

Girl Spots A Dark Ring Around Her Neck And Learns It's A Sign Of Diabetes

Girl Spots A Dark Ring Around Her Neck And Learns It's A Sign Of Diabetes

Your body cantellyou it needs help in a variety of ways. However, sometimes the way it manifests a problem isnt obvious, and you may not recognize that something your body is doing is actually the result of an underlying issue. Thats because these warning signs arenot always as simple to interpret as a sharppain. Very often your body can shoot out its own distress call that has nothing to do with pain at all. When one woman noticed that her teenage daughter was feeling sluggish, she didnt pay much attention. But then she saw this strange mark on her bodyand everything changed Sometimes your body does strange things in order to tell you when theres a problem. This was what14-year-old Pantera Mayhill learned the hard way. She wasthirsty all of the time and sufferedfrom headaches and mood swings, but she had no idea what was wrong with her. Then, whena dark ring appeared on the back of her neck, Pantera and her mother were more than a little bit concerned. They talked it over and finally decided it was time to go and see the doctor. They had no idea what they were about to find out. After a long time of feeling parched and suffering headaches, Pantera explained to the doctor how she didnt initially think it was a problem. She admitted it was only when she and her mother noticed the unusual discoloration that they just wanted to make sure. At first, her mom thought the mark was just dirt, but it quickly became obvious that something else was happening. After they booked an appointment with the doctor, they were shocked to learn that it was actually a sign that Panteras body wasnt properly producing insulin. This meant thatPantera likely had type-2 diabetes. Type-2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar. While it is absolutely tr Continue reading >>

Mom Noticed A Dark Ring Around Her Neck, But Never Expects Doctors To Say This...

Mom Noticed A Dark Ring Around Her Neck, But Never Expects Doctors To Say This...

Barbara is a passionate writer and animal lover who has been professionally blogging for over 10 years and counting. As obesity rates among kids has continued to climb in recent years, so have cases of Type 2 diabetes among children and teens. 14-year-old Pantera learned this firsthand when she began to notice sudden changes in her health.She was thirsty all the time and suffered from headaches and mood swings. But there was something else. Pantera had a strange, dark-colored ring around her neck. At first, her mother thought it was just dirt but that ring became the red flag that alerted her to Panteras Type 2 diabetes. Doctors say that if you see thisring, it meansyourinsulin isnt working properly. This could signify Type 2 diabetes , a lifelong condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar. In addition to the neck, this dark pigmentation known as acanthosis nigricans can also be found on the underarms or groin. According to AOCD.org, the elevated insulin levels in the body activates insulin receptors in the skin, forcing it to grow abnormally and cause extra pigment in the skin. Scroll down to seewhat this strange ring looks like Continue reading >>

How This Startup Is Beating The Ring Of Diabetes

How This Startup Is Beating The Ring Of Diabetes

How This Startup is Beating the Ring of Diabetes Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. You're reading Entrepreneur India, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media. World becomes a healthier place, not when doctors cure us, but rather when few sensitive people decide to take matters in their own hand and make a difference. Diabetes is a rampant epidemic in India that has impacted over 60 million people living in the country. Sensing the need to cater to this agony and personal experience of having suffered from the ailment, Yash along with his two friends founded BeatO. It aims at making quality diabetes care simple, affordable and accessible. This startup idea was incepted In June 2015 when Gautam, the Co-founder of BeatOmet Yash and learnt of his pre-diabetic state predicted by the doctors. Both, Yash and Gautam joined hands to work in the healthcare space. I decided to quit my cushy job with Lufthansa Group in Europe and moved back to India to start BeatO with Yash and Abhishek. It was a big decision as I decided to move my family that comprised of a 1 year old baby and a comfortable job with a large company with over 40,000 people! The next one for me will be when we hit a million users globally, said Gautam. Founded in August 2015, BeatO has attracted 15K downloads in less than 75 days, emerging as the top app for diabetes. BeatO is helping me get my HbA1c in control. I am a patient zero for team BeatO and it worked for me. At that time I knew we were taking small steps to build a simple, yet powerful service, said Yash Sehgal, Co-founder, BeatO. Challenges are the opportunities to excel For the Co-founders, challenges never hamper their spirits. Infact, they seek challenges as an opportunity to excel. All three of us truly believe Continue reading >>

Signs Of Diabetes

Signs Of Diabetes

Thats what reportedly happened to Rob Kardashian, the 28-year-old reality TV personality, this week. According to TMZ, he was rushed to an L.A. hospital and diagnosed with the condition. Rob had put on weight recently, but he no idea he had diabetes. And hes not alone: 25 percent of people with diabetes dont know theyre afflicted, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Paying attention to prediabetes warning signs could save you from an ER visit like Kardashiansand prevent you from ever developing full-blown diabetes. Here are the top silent alarms. (If these sound familiar, exercising and losing weight can reduce your risk. Try TheGet Back in Shape Workout: A 28-Day Program That Will Transform Your Body! ) 1. You know what the bathroom looks like at night. Because you visit often. As blood sugar levels go up, diabetes symptoms like frequent urination worsen. If 4 months ago you were getting up once in the middle of the night to pee and now youre getting up three times, thats a clue you need to get checked out, says Andrew Bremer, M.D., Ph.D., program director at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This may also be a symptom of prostate issues (such as an enlarged prostate). Either way, its best to bring the issue up with your doctor so he can rule out potential causes. You notice dark patches of skin on the back of your neck, but no matter how hard you rub, they wont come off. How come? Insulin resistance can cause a condition called acanthosis nigricans, which may appear during pre-diabetes. The dark, velvety patches can ring your neck and also appear on your elbows and knees. Once you get your glucose under control, the patches will likely fade away. Having high blood sugar levels in the long term damages the t Continue reading >>

Children's Diabetes Foundation 2018 Spring Brass Ring - Children's Diabetes Foundation

Children's Diabetes Foundation 2018 Spring Brass Ring - Children's Diabetes Foundation

At the young age of 24, Denise Kenny Snyder bought a womens retail store in Larimer Square, then called Better Sweater, Etc. Within a few years, she transformed the store into a full-service boutique with ready to wear, evening wear, jewelry, undergarments, shoes and a bridal salon. Styling women for more than 30 years, Snyder is best known as Colorados original personal fashion stylist. In a new space located in Cherry Creek, Mariel Boutique has recently reopened with a few refreshes to the store. Denise says, We are expanding evening wear and closing bridal. The stunning new Mariel Boutique located on the corner of 3rd and Milwaukee still features the ultimate in service and personal touches customers are so fond of. Aida, third generation designer, is a true artist at heart. A graduate from Otis Parsons in 1986, she became the head designer in an evening wear company. Aida has always followed her passion and through a remarkable series of opportunities that came her way, she used her innate talent and in 1996 she took her mothers advice and built a fashion design house under the name Nicole Bakti.Known throughout the world, Nicole Bakti by Aida is a well-known designer for occasions ranging from formal dinners and red carpet events. Working with numerous styles including Prom, Homecoming, Evening, Cocktail, and Mother-of-the-Bride dresses Nicole Bakti by Aida has earned its name as a top designer of elegant and beautiful dresses. Moreover, Nicole Bakti designs have been featured on the runways of New York, Los Angeles, and Milan Fashion Week. Designed in the headquarters in Los Angeles and spread throughout all major cities of the world. Printed programs are distributed to each event attendee. Click here for ad requirements and further details. To be included in the Continue reading >>

Wearable: Diabetes Monitoring - Caroline Rozendo

Wearable: Diabetes Monitoring - Caroline Rozendo

Student work Wearable: Diabetes monitoring Diabetics are a huge part of world population today, and urban life makes it more difficult to make healthy choices. This concept imagines a way to diminish the problem by monitoring blood glucose without finger pricking and giving constant feedback based on measurements from interstitial fluid. Tools and materials: Rhinoceros, conductive copper tape, RGB LEDs, soldering tools, 3D printing The project started with a lot of research on the disease and with patients and non-patients. The aim was to discover how people perceive diabetes and what kind of obstacles they saw in having life habits that help prevent or at least control the disease. The concept considers the importance of a trio of conditioners mentioned by BJ Fogg: motivation, capacity and trigger (Read more in " A Behavior Model for Persuasive Design ", 2009). The consequences of insulin deficiency and high glycemia are serious, but they come slowly. In the long term, chronic exposure of the organs to excessive glucose may lead to cardiovascular and neurological diseases, alterations of weight, cancer, blindness, limb amputation or even death. Constant attention to life habits is very important to avoid these consequences, but the modern lifestyle encourages consumption of over-processed food products. It is often difficult for many people to identify the impact of these products on glycemic index, and when they do identify them, the weight of long term consequences becomes light compared to the immediate pleasure of sugary foods. Since crystallized habits are difficult to modify, helping form new behavior is an arduous task for designers. Awareness campaigns usually have little immediate effect, and changing minds does not necessarily means changing behavior (NEAL, Continue reading >>

How Insulin Resistance And Diabetes Cause Tinnitus

How Insulin Resistance And Diabetes Cause Tinnitus

There is a direct link between insulin resistance, diabetes, and tinnitus. Studies have shown that most people with tinnitus have one of these conditions and treating them with diet and exercise can result in a significant reduction in tinnitus symptoms. There is a similar relationship between sugar metabolism disorders and Meniere’s disease. Exploring Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance refers to the condition where there is an elevated level of insulin in the bloodstream. It is also known as hyperinsulinemia. This occurs when insulin becomes inefficient at transferring glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream into the body’s cells. The pancreas then produces additional insulin. Over time, the pancreas cannot keep up with the decreased efficiency of the insulin and the result is clinical diabetes. This is called adult-onset Type II Diabetes. People who develop insulin resistance and Type II Diabetes typically have consumed excessive amounts of carbohydrates (sugars) for many years, which causes stress on the normal insulin/glucose transfer action until resistance develops. Insulin resistance and Type II Diabetes can be controlled through diet and exercise. In fact, insulin resistance can be controlled to the point where diabetes never develops. But how do these conditions cause tinnitus? The inner ear, like the brain, does not have fat reserves or any source of stored energy. It relies entirely on the delivery of oxygen and glucose from the bloodstream. If glucose delivery is interrupted, the cochlea and vestibular systems become dysfunctional. Tinnitus as well as Meniere’s disease can be the result of this condition. We published an earlier (and longer) version of this subject, Sugar Metabolism, Ketones and Tinnitus. A study on Insulin Resistance and Tinnitus A cl Continue reading >>

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