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Diabetes Report

Special Report: Managing Diabetes

Special Report: Managing Diabetes

Diabetes has reached virtually epidemic levels in the modern world. In 2005 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that about 7 percent of the American population (20.9 million people) had diabetes--and 6.2 million of them were unaware of it. More than 1.5 million people over the age of 20 will be diagnosed with it in the U.S. this year. About 21 percent of those older than 60 have the disease. Small wonder, then, given the severe complications associated with diabetes, that it continues to be the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. And although diabetes was often called a disease of affluence in the past, it is now one of the fastest-rising health concerns in developing nations as well: the World Health Organization pegs the global total at more than 171 million cases. An unfortunate catch-22 of diabetes is that although the right diet and exercise can help with its prevention and management, diabetes itself can complicate both eating and physical activity. Patients may need to pay extra attention to taking meals on a regular schedule and to monitoring how exercise dehydrates them or lowers their blood glucose. Some may fail to comply consistently with prescribed regimens that seem inconvenient or unpleasant, thereby raising their risk of complications. But thanks to leaps in science's understanding of the disease, doctors now wield a diverse and growing arsenal of drugs and management technologies to fight the progression--and even onset--of illness. People with diabetes have more and better options than ever before for enjoying healthy, active, long lives. Background Diabetes is a disease in which too much of a sugar called glucose accumulates in the blood because of a breakdown in how the body makes or reacts to the hormone insulin. Insul Continue reading >>

How Do Patients With Diabetes Report Their Comorbidity? Comparison With Administrative Data

How Do Patients With Diabetes Report Their Comorbidity? Comparison With Administrative Data

Editor who approved publication: Professor Vera Ehrenstein Jonas Hoffmann,1,* Burkhard Haastert,2,* Manuela Brne,1 Matthias Kaltheuner,3 Alexander Begun,1 Nadja Chernyak,4 Andrea Icks1,4,5 1Institute of Health Services Research and Health Economics, German Diabetes Center, Dsseldorf, Germany; 2mediStatistica, Neuenrade, Germany; 3Specialized Diabetes Practice Leverkusen, Leverkusen, Germany; 4Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Health and Society, Institute of Health Services Research and Health Economics, Heinrich-Heine University Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany; 5German Center for Diabetes Research, Ingolstdter Neuherberg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Aims: Patients with diabetes are probably often unaware of their comorbidities. We estimated agreement between self-reported comorbidities and administrative data. Methods: In a random sample of 464 diabetes patients, data from a questionnaire asking about the presence of 14 comorbidities closely related to diabetes were individually linked with statutory health insurance data. Results: Specificities were >97%, except cardiac insufficiency (94.5%), eye diseases (93.8%), peripheral arterial disease (92.6%), hypertension (90.9%), and peripheral neuropathy (85.8%). Sensitivities were <60%, except amputation (100%), hypertension (83.1%), and myocardial infarction (67.2%). A few positive predictive values were >90% (hypertension, myocardial infarction, and eye disease), and six were below 70%. Six negative predictive values were >90%, and two <70% (hypertension and eye disease). Total agreement was between 42.7% (eye disease) and 100% (dialysis and amputation). Overall, substantial agreement was observed for three morbidities (kappa 0.610.80: hypertension, myocardial infarction, and amputation). Moderate Continue reading >>

Global Report On Diabetes

Global Report On Diabetes

On the occasion of World Health Day 2016, WHO issues a call for action on diabetes, drawing attention to the need to step up prevention and treatment of the disease. The first WHO Global report on diabetes demonstrates that the number of adults living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults. This dramatic rise is largely due to the rise in type 2 diabetes and factors driving it include overweight and obesity. In 2012 alone diabetes caused 1.5 million deaths. Its complications can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation. The new report calls upon governments to ensure that people are able to make healthy choices and that health systems are able to diagnose, treat and care for people with diabetes. It encourages us all as individuals to eat healthily, be physically active, and avoid excessive weight gain. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Report Card

Diabetes Report Card

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Diabetes Report Card [PDF 5MB] is published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) based on The Catalyst to Better Diabetes Care in the Patient Protection and Affordability Care Act. This report provides current information on the status of diabetes in the United States. It includes information and data about diabetes, prediabetes, preventive care practices, risk factors, quality of care, outcomes, progress made towards meeting national diabetes goals, and, to the extent possible, national and state trends. The 2017 Diabetes Report Card highlights encouraging trends and ongoing challenges: The rate of new cases of diabetes among US adults has decreased. The rate of new cases of diabetes among children and adolescents has increased. The first national prediabetes awareness campaign was launched to encourage people to find out their risk. More than 1 million have completed the prediabetes risk test. New diabetes resources have been developed to help employers, health insurers, and states. Continue reading >>

Epidemiological Correlates Of Diabetic Neuropathy. Report From Pittsburghepidemiology Of Diabetes Complications Study.

Epidemiological Correlates Of Diabetic Neuropathy. Report From Pittsburghepidemiology Of Diabetes Complications Study.

Epidemiological correlates of diabetic neuropathy. Report from PittsburghEpidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study. Maser RE(1), Steenkiste AR, Dorman JS, Nielsen VK, Bass EB, Manjoo Q, Drash AL,Becker DJ, Kuller LH, Greene DA, et al. (1)Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, PA. The natural history of diabetic neuropathy and its risk factors are not wellunderstood, apart from the recognition that prevalence increases with durationand, in many studies, degree of glycemia. The role of potential risk factors was therefore evaluated in a cross-sectional analysis from the baseline examinationof the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study. We presentresults from the first 400 subjects seen at baseline examination. Neuropathy was determined by a trained internist with a standardized examination and was definedas the presence of at least two of three criteria: abnormal sensory or motorsigns, symptoms consistent with neuropathy, and decreased tendon reflexes. Theprevalence of neuropathy in this cohort was 34% (18%, 18-29 yr old, 58% greaterthan or equal to 30 yr old) with no difference by sex. By focusing on subjectsgreater than or equal to 18 yr old, all significant univariate variables (e.g.,duration, glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1]) were analyzed in 3 multiple logisticregression models: all subjects greater than or equal to 18 yr old and separatingthe same subjects into two groups based on age (18-29 and greater than or equalto 30 yr). Duration, HbA1, smoking status, and high-density lipoproteincholesterol were found to be associated with neuropathy in the models for thegreater than or equal to 18-yr-old group and the greater than or equal to30-yr-old group. In the 18- to 29-yr-old group, duration, HbA1, and hypertension status were found to Continue reading >>

Report: Adherence To Diabetes Rx

Report: Adherence To Diabetes Rx

Diabetes is one of the most costly and concerning conditions for employers and plan sponsors. The CDC estimates that more than 30 million Americans have diabetes, with another 84 million having elevated blood sugar, putting them on the cusp of type 2 diabetes. All told, roughly one out of every three people in the U.S. has the potential to need treatment for diabetes. In Diabetes Dilemma: U.S. Trends in Diabetes Medication Use, we examined diabetes medication use among 1.4 million commercially insured members to identify what’s working, and where there might be room for improvement in outcomes and in reducing costs. Good News for Patients and Plan Sponsors Our most significant observation concerns adherence: people who were adherent to their oral diabetes medications experienced 235 fewer ER visits and 50 fewer inpatient hospitalizations per 1000 patients, and they spent nearly $500 less on total healthcare costs compared to nonadherent patients, potentially avoiding more than $210 million in healthcare spending in 2016. People with diabetes who were nonadherent to their oral diabetes drugs had 1.3 times higher medical costs and 4% higher total healthcare costs compared to those who were adherent, spending an average of $11,176 vs. $10,683 in 2016. While not all diabetes-related complications are avoidable, among people with diabetes who had diabetes-related complications, such as blindness, diabetic foot pain or chronic kidney disease, healthcare costs for adherent patients with diabetes-related complications were 9.4% lower than for those who were not adherent to their oral diabetes drugs in 2016. Nonadherence Amplifies Costs Employers spent more than $9,000 in total medical expenses per person with diabetes, nearly three times more than for individuals without diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Report

Diabetes Report

Diabetes Report Released During CSG 2017 National Conference LAS VEGASThe Council of State Governments released a diabetes report, titledDiabetes in the United States: Examining Growth Trends, State Funding Sources and Economic Impact, on Friday, Dec. 15, during a session sponsored by the CSG Health Public Policy Committee at the CSG 2017 National Conference in Las Vegas. The number of adults with diagnosed diabetes increased nearly five-fold in the United States between 1980 and 2015from 5.5 million to 25.8 millionaccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Costs associated with diabetes are estimated at more than $160 billion every year from medical treatment and indirect costs due to lost productivity, unemployment and premature mortality. CSG, with assistance from the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, surveyed all 50 states to determine the number of states that appropriate funds for diabetes prevention and management. Half of the states reported state funds used in fiscal year 2017 for diabetes programs specificallyor broader public health efforts that included diabetes. In six statesColorado, Maryland, Michigan, New York, North Carolina and Tennesseethe 2017 appropriations topped a million dollars each. Spending levels varied from a high of $6.6 million in Colorado to a low of $5,000 in South Dakota. As a nurse, I know that the potential exists to prevent people from getting diabetes through interventions that build healthy communities. In Massachusetts, the Legislature recognizes this potential and allocates state funds to help achieve that public health goal. The just-completed CSG survey found half of the states legislatures recognize the growing burden of diabetes and accordingly budgeted state dollars to curb the growth of t Continue reading >>

Current Diabetes Reports

Current Diabetes Reports

Description Current Diabetes Reports provides in-depth review articles contributed by international experts on the most significant developments in the field. By presenting clear, insightful, balanced reviews that emphasize recently published papers of major importance, the journal elucidates current and emerging approaches to the diagnosis, treatment, management, and prevention of diabetes. Browse Volumes & Issues Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Report

Free Diabetes Report

Don't wait until your condition gets worse! You can correct the root causes of diabetes Discover how the patients below were able to reverse their diabetes "When I first came in to see the doctor, I wasn't sleeping, was always sick, and was experiencing a wide variety of other medical conditions. I didn't want to have to take medication and insulin shots every day for the rest of my life. After seeing the doctor, I am a new woman physically, mentally and emotionally! I have seen this program work for me and would highly recommend it to anyone ready for a change in their life!. Request your free diabetes eBook today to find out how: You can reduce and/or eliminate the need for dangerous medications, including Metformin and insulin. You can get blood sugar levels and blood pressure into the normal ranges without being prescribed more drugs. You can decrease your risk factors for heart disease, amputations, cancer, and other deadly side-effects of Type 2 Diabetes. Balanced Health Solutions 2017. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy Continue reading >>

Report To Congress | Special Diabetes Program For Indians (sdpi)

Report To Congress | Special Diabetes Program For Indians (sdpi)

Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) Division of Diabetes Treatment and Prevention The Division of Diabetes has submitted several reports to Congress on the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) since Congress created the program in 1997. The current Report to Congress (2014) is available below. For those who are interested, previous reports (2011 and 2007) are also below. The 2014 Report to Congress highlights the SDPI's ongoing and outstanding accomplishments in improving the quality of diabetes care and health outcomes for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people. As the 2014 report shows, SDPI programs are continuing to implement evidence-based interventions to treat and prevent diabetes in ways that significantly reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications for AI/AN people. In partnership with the Indian health system, the SDPI grantee sites have accomplished incredible outcomes that are contributing to a healthier future for the people and communities they serve. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Audit Report 1- Findings And Recommendations 2016-17

National Diabetes Audit Report 1- Findings And Recommendations 2016-17

National Diabetes Audit Report 1- Findings and Recommendations 2016-17 Hospital Trusts, Local Authorities, Clinical Commissioning Groups, GP practices The National Diabetes Audit (NDA) is part of the National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme (NCAPOP) which is commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) and funded by NHS England. The NDA is managed by NHS Digital in partnership with Diabetes UK. The NDA measures the effectiveness of diabetes healthcare against NICE Clinical Guidelines and NICE Quality Standards, in England and Wales. The NDA collects and analyses data for use by a range of stakeholders to drive changes and improvements in the quality of services and health outcomes for people with diabetes. This reportdetails thefindings for the 2016-17 audit. The audit collected data during the Summer of 2017, for the period 1 January 2016 to 31 March 2017 and contains the full key findings, recommendations, results of analysis for multiple readings, and information for learning disability and severe mental illness. Continue reading >>

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland Correspondence Address: Gojka Roglic Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, Avenue Appia 20, 1211 Geneva Switzerland Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None The first WHO Global Report on Diabetes was launched on World Health Day 7 th April 2016 which was dedicated to Diabetes (1). Diabetes has been described in ancient scripts and recognized as a serious illness, but it does not appear to have been frequently encountered by physicians or healers. It is in the past few decades that human health and development is increasingly affected by the rising numbers of people with this condition. Diabetes, together with cardiovascular disease, cancer and chronic respiratory disease has been targeted in the Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) at the Un High-level Political Meeting in 2011. In 2013 WHO member states endorsed a global monitoring framework for noncommunicable diseases, with 9 targets to be reached by 2025. Diabetes and its key risk factors are strongly reflected in the targets and indicators - reduction of exposure to unhealthy diet and physical inactivity, zero rise in the prevalence of diabetes, improved access to treatment and reduction of premature mortality. As part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Member States have set an ambitious target to reduce premature mortality from NCDs - including diabetes - by one third; achieve universal health coverage; and provide access to affordable essential medicines - all by 2030( Keywords: Diabetes, global report, Continue reading >>

Defining And Reporting Hypoglycemia In Diabetes

Defining And Reporting Hypoglycemia In Diabetes

A report from the American Diabetes Association Workgroup on Hypoglycemia Iatrogenic hypoglycemia causes recurrent morbidity in most people with type 1 diabetes and in many with type 2 diabetes and is sometimes fatal. It also impairs defenses against subsequent hypoglycemia. Furthermore, the barrier of hypoglycemia precludes maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes; thus, full realization of the benefits of glycemic control is rarely achieved. Therefore, hypoglycemia is the critical limiting factor in the glycemic management of diabetes in both the short and long term (1). Clinicians have recognized the problem of iatrogenic hypoglycemia since the first use of insulin in 1922 (2). The problem was underscored 70 years later by the finding that intensive glycemic therapy both decreased the frequency of long-term complications and increased the frequency of hypoglycemia in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) (3,4). Despite steady improvements in the glycemic management of diabetes, and perhaps because of the impetus for glycemic control that resulted from the DCCT (3,4) and the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (5,6), recent population-based data indicate that hypoglycemia continues to be a major problem for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (7–9). The ultimate goal of the glycemic management of diabetes is a lifetime of euglycemia without hypoglycemia. That will undoubtedly require glucose-regulated insulin replacement or secretion (10). Pending that, the goal of new drugs, devices, or management strategies to be used for the glycemic management of diabetes is to both improve glycemic control and reduce the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia. How should new drugs, devices, or strategies be evaluated and reported from the perspect Continue reading >>

Best Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

At-a-glance Six classes of oral medicines (and 12 individual drugs) are now available to help the 25.8 million people in the U.S. with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar when diet and lifestyle changes are not enough. Our evaluation of these medicines found the following: Newer drugs are no better. Two drugs from a class called the sulfonylureas and a drug named metformin have been around for more than a decade and work just as well as newer medicines. Indeed, several of the newer drugs, such as Januvia and Onglyza, are less effective than the older medications. Newer drugs are no safer. All diabetes pills have the potential to cause adverse effects, both minor and serious. The drugs’ safety and side effect “profiles” may be the most important factor in your choice. The newer drugs are more expensive. The newer diabetes medicines cost many times more than the older drugs. Taking more than one diabetes drug is often necessary. Many people with diabetes do not get enough blood sugar control from one medicine. Two or more may be necessary. However, taking more than one diabetes drug raises the risk of adverse effects and increases costs. Taking effectiveness, safety, adverse effects, dosing, and cost into consideration, we have chosen the following as Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs if your doctor and you have decided that you need medicine to control your diabetes: Metformin and Metformin Sustained-Release — alone or with glipizide or glimepiride Glipizide and Glipizide Sustained-Release — alone or with metformin Glimepiride — alone or with metformin These medicines are available as low-cost generics, costing from $4 to $35 a month. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, we recommend that you try metformin first unless it's inappropriate for your hea Continue reading >>

Audit Report Of The Hse Midland Diabetes Structured Care Programme

Audit Report Of The Hse Midland Diabetes Structured Care Programme

Audit Report of the HSE Midland Diabetes Structured Care Programme Audit Report of the HSE Midland Diabetes Structured Care Programme Riordan, F ; McHugh, S ; Marsden, P ; Kearney, P ; Harkins, V Riordan F., McHugh S., Marsden P., Kearney P., Harkins V. Audit Report of the HSE Midland Diabetes Structured Care Programme. Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive Dublin Mid-Leinster. 2017. The HSE Midland Diabetes Structured Care Programme (MDSCP) is one of the longest established primary care based diabetes care programmes in Ireland. The programme is dedicated to improving the quality of care for patients with diabetes in the counties of Longford, Westmeath, Laois and Offaly. It is comprised of several evidence-based strategies to improve diabetes management, including the use of clinical guidelines, patient register and recall and protected time for review visits, ongoing organisation and coordination of care by practice nurses, structured multidisciplinary support and professional and patient education. Since its establishment in 1997/1998 the MDSCP has contributed to the evidence base for structured primary care-led diabetes management in Ireland. The programme has potential to provide insight into the long-term performance and sustainability of a primary care-led approach to diabetes care in the Irish context. Using data from the most recent audit of the programme carried out in 2015/2016, the current report aims to assess the quality of care delivered by the programme benchmarked against national guidelines and international performance in diabetes management. It also reviews trends in the performance of the programme over four years of data collection and audit. Key findings from the audit are outlined under the titles: patient profile, processes of c Continue reading >>

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