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Diabetes Rate By State

The Cdc Mapped Out Where People With Diabetes Live In The Us — Here's What It Found

The Cdc Mapped Out Where People With Diabetes Live In The Us — Here's What It Found

A paramedic checking the blood sugar levels of a diabetes patient. Beawiharta Beawiharta/Reuters Diabetes, a group of conditions in which the body can't properly regulate blood sugar, affects roughly 30 million people in the US — about 9% of the population. That's in addition to 84.1 million Americans who the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate have prediabetes, a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes if it isn't treated. (Type 2 accounts for the majority of diabetes cases.) In a new report by the CDC, researchers found that while the rate of new diabetes diagnoses in the US has stayed steady, the disease is still a major public health issue across the country. Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the US in 2015. "Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes," CDC director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said in a news release. Those cases are disproportionately spread around the country. The map below shows where people with diabetes live across the US, with the darker red shades representing areas where a larger percentage of the population has been diagnosed with diabetes. CDC Areas with the highest concentration of cases are southern states like Mississippi and Alabama, along with Puerto Rico, a US territory. In those locations, diabetes was prevalent in more than 11% of adults over 20. When it comes to new diagnoses, the states with the highest rates per 1,000 people are also in the southeast, as well as parts of Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia. CDC Information about where diabetes prevalence is highest can help public health officials figure out where to devote the most attention in their attempt to bring down the number of cases nat Continue reading >>

Please Tell Us A Little More About You

Please Tell Us A Little More About You

Diabetes U.S. Value: United States: 10.0% Healthiest State: Utah: 7.1% Least-healthy State: West Virginia: 14.1% Definition: Percentage of adults who reported being told by a health professional that they have diabetes (excludes prediabetes and gestational diabetes) Data Source & Year(s): CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2014 Suggested Citation: America's Health Rankings analysis of CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United Health Foundation, AmericasHealthRankings.org, Accessed 2014. Why does this matter? Diabetes — the nation’s seventh-leading cause of death accounting for more than 79,500 deaths annually — contributes to heart disease and stroke, the leading and fifth leading causes of death, respectively. There are three major types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. Diabetes is a leading cause of kidney failure, nontraumatic lower-limb amputations and blindness in adults. In 2017 a staggering 30.3 million Americans (9.4 percent of the U.S. population) had diabetes, 23.1 million of which were diagnosed and 7.2 million of which were undiagnosed. In 2015 alone, 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among adults aged 18 and older. Direct medical costs and lost productivity attributable to diabetes is estimated to be $245 billion each year — accounting for one in five health care dollars.[1] Among people with diagnosed diabetes, direct medical costs are twice as high compared with people without diabetes after adjusting for population age and sex differences. Cost estimates that include undiagnosed cases, prediabetes, and all types of diagnosed diabetes are far higher, exceeding $322 billion in 2012. Who is affected? Type 2 diabetes is a largely preven Continue reading >>

County-level

County-level "diabetes Belt" Carves A Swath Through U.s. South

More than 18 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with diabetes, which costs an estimated $174 billion annually. Typically, local public health agencies carry out the initiatives to manage and prevent this chronic disease, but because prevalence figures are generally given on national and state levels, local workers cannot gain the traction—and funding—to rein in rates in their areas. A new study drills down to the county level, revealing wide disparities within states and striking national patterns. "We're extremely excited about the county level," says Lawrence Barker, associate director for science at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Diabetes Translation. Many of the counties with the highest rates of diagnosed diabetes—higher than 11.2 percent of the population compared with the national average of 8.5 percent—are concentrated in 15 states and form an area the study's authors have labeled the "diabetes belt" (after the so-called "stroke belt" that described U.S. Southeast in the 1960s). "We've known for many years that there was a lot of diabetes in the Southeast," Barker says. But the new analysis, based on data from the self-reported national phone survey called the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), confirmed that the disease has a distinctive geographical distribution. The map and findings will be published in the April 2011 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The pattern of disease distribution is not a simple slice—nor does it follow the stroke belt. The diabetes belt touches states as far north as Ohio and Pennsylvania and as far west as Texas. But overall averages for many of these outlying states would not reveal the plights of their few high-prevalence counties. Sta Continue reading >>

About Type 2 Diabetes

About Type 2 Diabetes

What is Type 2 Diabetes? If you have diabetes, take this challenge. Your A1C level is an important indicator of long-term blood sugar control, but about one-third of adults with diabetes are not at their A1C goal. Join Tim McGraw and pledge to work with your doctor to get to your A1C goal (and your family or friends with diabetes as well). Find out more » Did you know that the Mississippi State Department of Health Office of Preventive Health is available to offer A1C screenings for state employees at Mississippi State agency's events? Find out more » Diabetes is an incurable disease that affects the way the body uses food. Diabetes causes glucose levels in the blood to be too high. Normally, during digestion the body changes sugars, starches, and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Glucose is carried to the body's cells and, with the help of insulin (a hormone), is converted into energy. In healthy people, blood glucose levels are kept within normal ranges by proper insulin function. People develop type 2 diabetes because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly. As a result, the amount of sugar in the blood increases, while the cells are starved of energy. Over time, high blood sugar damages nerves and blood vessels, leading to complications such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Prevented? In this video, people with pre-diabetes talk about how the CDC's group lifestyle change classes helped them learn and keep healthy habits. Full size » Yes. The National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that moderate diet and exercise that results in 5 to 7 percent weight loss can delay Continue reading >>

23 Of 25 States With Highest Rates Of Obesity Are In The South And Midwest

23 Of 25 States With Highest Rates Of Obesity Are In The South And Midwest

23 of 25 States with Highest Rates of Obesity are in the South and Midwest Washington, D.C.United States adult obesity rates remained mostly steadybut highthis past year, increasing in Kansas, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ohio and Utah and remaining stable in the rest, according to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America , a report from the Trust for Americas Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Arkansas had the highest adult obesity rate at 35.9 percent, while Colorado had the lowest at 21.3 percent. The 12th annual report found that rates of obesity now exceed 35 percent in three states (Arkansas, West Virginia and Mississippi), are at or above 30 percent in 22 states and are not below 21 percent in any. In 1980, no state had a rate above 15 percent, and in 1991, no state had a rate above 20. Now, nationally, more than 30 percent of adults, nearly 17 percent of 2 to 19 year olds and more than 8 percent of children ages 2 to 5 are obese. Obesity puts some 78 million Americans at an increased risk for a range of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Efforts to prevent and reduce obesity over the past decade have made a difference. Stabilizing rates is an accomplishment. However, given the continued high rates, it isnt time to celebrate, said Jeffrey Levi, PhD, executive director of TFAH. Weve learned that if we invest in effective programs, we can see signs of progress. But, we still havent invested enough to really tip the scales yet. Other key findings from The State of Obesity include: Obesity rates differ by region, age and race/ethnicity: Seven of the 10 states with the highest rates are in the South and 23 of the 25 states with the highest rates of obesity are in the South and Midwest. Nine of the 1 Continue reading >>

This 1 U.s. State Has The Highest Diabetes Rate In The Country

This 1 U.s. State Has The Highest Diabetes Rate In The Country

This 1 U.S. State Has the Highest Diabetes Rate in the Country The United States is well known for its obesity problem. Obesity can lead to health complications like heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes . As of 2015, about 9.4% of the population had type 2 diabetes according to Diabetes.org. However, the disease is far more prevalent in certain states. Weve ranked the top 10 states with the highest type 2 diabetes rates and followed it with the top 10 states with the lowest type 2 diabetes rates. The rates are according to stateofobesity.org . Oklahoma is the first state to make the list with about 12% of its adult population living with diabetes . 32.8% of Oklahomas adult population is obese. Oklahoma requires its elementary school students to participate in physical education classes but not its middle school or high school students. PE classes can be a driving force in helping children prevent obesity and diabetes in later years. Louisiana ties for the eighth position with 12.1% of its population suffering from diabetes . It is also the fifth most obese state in the nation, with 35.5% of its population falling into the obese category. 34% of Louisiana youth are either overweight or obese, but the state does require physical education classes for students of all ages. Georgia | Sean Pavone/iStock/Getty Images Georgia ties with Louisiana with 12.1% of its population dealing with diabetes . However, when it comes to obesity, Georgia is much better off than Louisiana Georgia ranks 20th in obesity in the U.S. Georgia requires physical education classes in its elementary schools and high schools, but 32.2% of children are still either obese or overweight. Next: The country music capital has a diabetes problem. Tennessee | Sean Pavone/iStock/Getty Images In Tennessee, Continue reading >>

Here Are The States With The Lowest & Highest Diabetes Rates

Here Are The States With The Lowest & Highest Diabetes Rates

Diabetes is on the rise in the United States, and a new poll looks at where the disease is most and least common. In the poll, from Gallup-Healthways, researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of more than 176,000 Americans in all 50 states in 2015. The participants were asked whether they had ever been diagnosed with diabetes in their lifetime. The three states with the lowest rates of diabetes were Utah, Rhode Island and Colorado. In these states, 7.5 to 8 percent of the survey participants said they had diabetes. In contrast, Alabama and West Virginia had the highest rates of diabetes, with about 16 percent of the participants in those two states saying they had been diagnosed with the disease. The poll also looked at the rate of diabetes in cities nationwide. The city with the lowest rate of diabetes was Boulder, Colorado, where slightly less than 5 percent of residents said they had diabetes, followed by Bellingham, Washington, where about 6 percent said they had diabetes. The two cities with the highest rates of diabetes were Mobile, Alabama, and Charleston, West Virginia, where more than 17 percent of residents said they had diabetes. [Diabetes in America: Full List of State Rankings] The results were published Wednesday (Nov. 30) in a report from Gallup-Healthways. "Lower rates of diabetes could point to citizens of a particular state or community practicing healthier behaviors, which, in turn, could lead to better health outcomes and lower incidence of chronic conditions," Gallup-Healthways said in its report. "But a lower rate could also signal underdiagnoses" of diabetes, the report said. The overall rate of diabetes in the United States in 2016 was 11.5 percent, up from 10.6 percent in 2008, Gallup-Healthways said. (The 2016 data is based on a Continue reading >>

7 States Where Diabetes Prevalence Is The Highest

7 States Where Diabetes Prevalence Is The Highest

Diabetes: It's one of the most widespread chronic diseases in the United States, yet is also one of the most ignored and underdiagnosed. According to the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its National Diabetes Statistics Report (link opens PDF), there are now 29.1 million people, or 9.3% the population, living with diabetes in the United States as of 2012. Of those 29.1 million people, the CDC estimates that 8.1 million, or roughly 28%, are undiagnosed. Compared to CDC's prior National Diabetes Statistics Report in 2010, which had pegged just 25.8 million cases of diabetes in the U.S., this jump is both significant and alarming. I say alarming because the direct and indirect costs of diabetes can be absolutely staggering to individuals, their families, and the healthcare system as a whole. Diabetes can bring about a bevy of health complications, such as an increased chance of heart disease, stroke, or kidney disease. However, complications associated with the disease can also cause people to miss work, become disabled, or even die prematurely. The CDC calculated this estimated direct (e.g., medical expenditures) and indirect cost to be a whopping $245 billion. Seven states where diabetes is the most prevalent It's also a disease that, while affecting people all over the U.S., seems to be more prevalent in seven states. According to CDC statistics, the seven states where the highest percentage of adults have been diagnosed with diabetes as of 2010 are: Mississippi (11.3%) Alabama (11.1%) West Virginia (10.7%) Louisiana (10.3%) Tennessee (10.2%) Oklahoma (10.1%) Kentucky (10.1%) With the exception of Oklahoma, a number of counties in these aforementioned states, as well as in a handful of other adjoining states, make up what the CDC Continue reading >>

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Implementation and evaluation of diabetes prevention and control programs depends on reliable data. The following data sources tell us how many people in Texas are estimated to have diabetes and the groups most affected by the disease. They allow for development of culturally appropriate messages and assist in focusing prevention efforts on high-risk populations. The Diabetes Program at DSHS develops epidemiological reports on diabetes incidence, prevalence, morbidity, and mortality in Texas. The program contracts for annual statewide telephone surveys through the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, participates in statewide and international collaborative data collection projects, and reviews information from the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) and the TMF Health Quality Institute, which is the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization. Data from these and other sources are collected and illustrated in the burden report below. The Diabetes Program updates this report periodically as data collection occurs and data is verified for publication. The Texas Diabetes Fact Sheet offers at-a-glance diabetes prevalence and mortality statistics for Texas by race/ethnicity, age, and gender. Requests for specific data will be addressed as time and availability of data permit. To ensure that data requests are fulfilled in a timely manner, please submit your requests at least two weeks before the data is needed. Texas Diabetes and Prediabetes Fact Sheet (Updated September 2017, 178kb, PDF viewing information) Diabetes and prediabetes prevalence, mortality, and cost data for Texas. Diabetes Trend Data, Texas and US, 2011-2015 (Updated March 2017, PDF 923kb, PDF viewing information) Current Diabetes Prevalence Among Adults by Demographic C Continue reading >>

How Disease Rates Vary By State And What States Can Do About It

How Disease Rates Vary By State And What States Can Do About It

The Pew Charitable Trusts Research & Analysis Stateline How Disease Rates Vary by State and What States Can Do About It How Disease Rates Vary by State and What States Can Do About It Audience members cheer after the Philadelphia City Council passed a tax on sugary and diet beverages in June. Geographic health disparities, like Philadelphias high rate of obesity, can propel health policy. By many measures, Hawaii is one of the healthiest states in the union. Yet only Mississippi has a higher rate of flu or pneumonia deaths than the Aloha State. West Virginia, which is usually among the bottom dwellers in state health rankings, is in the middle of the pack when it comes to deaths related to Alzheimers disease. Similarly, relatively unhealthy Arkansas has a low rate of drug overdose deaths while Connecticut, which ranks near the top in overall health, has one of the countrys highest rates of death linked to drug use. Health disparities based on race, income and gender tend to draw more notice, but variations related to where people live are attracting the attention of public health officials, who are using the information to craft more-targeted policies. As the data become more precise, health policy experts believe interventions to combat geographic disparities will become even more effective. The increasing interest comes amid a growing recognition that peoples health depends as much on geographic factors such as recreation, transportation, crime and unemployment as it does on what takes place in doctors offices or hospitals. In many ways, your ZIP code is more important than your genetic code when it comes to health, said Jay Butler, Alaskas chief medical officer and its director of public health. The truth of that observation is evident in a single comparison from a Continue reading >>

Obesity And Diabetes In The United States

Obesity And Diabetes In The United States

Obesity and Diabetes in the United States By Nancy Coleman, CSG-WEST Health Committee Coordinator A new Gallup-Healthways study estimates that the obesity rate in the United States in 2012 has increased to 26.2% from 25.5% in 2008. Colorado leads the nation with the lowest rate of obesity (18.7%) nationwide - a distinction it has held since 2010. West Virginia is the state with the highest obesity rate (33.5%), down from 35.3% in 2011. Obesity rates tend to be higher in the Southern and Midwest regions and lower in the Western and Eastern regions. The CDC estimates medical care costs of obesity in the United States are staggering; in 2008 dollars, these costs totaled about $147 billion. The problem with obesity isn't only increased weight, but increased risk of a number of chronic diseases, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and Type 2 diabetes. Gallup-Healthways also examined rates of diabetes and high blood pressure in the United State and found that 29.3% of adults diagnosed with high blood pressure was slightly lower, while 11% of adults reported having diabetes. According to the study , "diabetes rates are highest in the same states where obesity and high blood pressure levels are highest: West Virginia and Mississippi. Louisiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee are also among the top 10 states with the highest rates of diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity." The rapid growth of diabetes in the United States is a large contributor to increased U.S. health care costs. Insurers are focusing their efforts in reducing health care costs for people who have chronic diseases and are accountable for a great portion of costs. The American Diabetes Association estimates the total costs of diagnosed diabetes has risen to $245 billion in 2012 from $174 billion in 2007 Continue reading >>

The Best (and Worst) States For Diabetes

The Best (and Worst) States For Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. The United States is experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Since 2008, the number of Americans with diabetes has risen by 2.2 million people, and the rate has increased rapidly with growing obesity. Yet some states appear to be faring better than others. On Wednesday, Gallup and Healthways released a new report ranking states and communities on incidence of diabetes for 2015. The new report shows Utah, Rhode Island and Colorado have the lowest incidence of diabetes in the United States. In each of those states, less than 8% of the population has diabetes. That’s significantly different than the rates reported in other states. For instance, Alabama and West Virginia have the highest number of people with diabetes in their state, with over 16% of the population with a diabetes diagnosis. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now The researchers cite the obesity epidemic as one of the greatest contributing factors to the high rates of diabetes in the U.S. More than a third of American adults are obese. “While not all people with diabetes are obese, and not all who are obese develop diabetes, research shows that about 54% of middle aged Americans who are obese and have not yet developed diabetes will do so in their lifetime,” the report authors write. The study authors also looked at specific communities within states for a deeper picture on what regions of the nation are doing well, and which communities need some work. They found that Boulder, Colo., Bellingham, Wash., Fort Collins, Colo., and Provo-Orem, Utah report the lowest incidence rates out of cities nationwide. Boulder is especially low with less than 5% of people in the city diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Healthy Nj 2020 | Diabetes

Healthy Nj 2020 | Diabetes

Diabetes is the eighth leading cause of death in New Jersey. It is the fifth leading cause among Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians; sixth among males; and eighth among Whites and females. In New Jersey, nearly 2,000 deaths each year are due to diabetes. The age-adjusted death rate due to diabetes is about 18 per 100,000 standard population. The age-adjusted death rate among males is more than double the rate among females. The rate among Blacks is much higher than that of other racial/ethnic groups but the gap is narrowing. The DOH Diabetes Prevention and Control Program seeks to reduce the health impacts of diabetes by increasing awareness of diabetes and its complications, improving the quality of diabetes care and access to care, developing partnerships and increasing community involvement to address diabetes issues, and utilizing data to better apply resources and improve health outcomes. The rate of new adult diabetes cases is increasing in the state. In 2016, the diabetes prevalence was 9.2%. Approximately 640,000 adults have diabetes statewide. Continue reading >>

U.s. States And Communities Ranked By Incidence Of Diabetes

U.s. States And Communities Ranked By Incidence Of Diabetes

U.S. States and Communities Ranked by Incidence of Diabetes New research, part of the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series, examines the incidence of diabetes within all 50 states and across190 U.S. communities. Since 2008, when Gallup and Healthways began tracking diabetes in the U.S., an estimated2 million more adults are reporting that they have been diagnosed with the disease. Additionally, the obesity rate, a significant risk factor for diabetes,has climbed by almost 3 points since 2008, to reach 28.3% nationally in 2016. Utah, Rhode Island, and Coloradoare the states with the lowest incidence of diabetes within their populations, with less than 8% of their adult populations having been diagnosed with the disease. Boulder, Colorado,Bellingham, Washington, andFort Collins, Coloradolead the community rankings with the lowest reported levels of the disease. Alabama and West Virginiaare the states with the highest diabetes prevalence, both with more than 16% of their residents diagnosed with diabetes.The communities ofMobile, Alabama and Charleston, West Virginia place last in the nation, with more than 17% of their respective adult populations having the disease. The report also highlightshospitals and health systems which have implementedinnovative diabetes managementprograms toensure patients have better health outcomes and better quality of life. To view the full rankings, download a copy of the report today . You can also subscribe to content from the Well-Being Index; by subscribing, well let you know when we release new reports and insights from the Well-Being Index. Continue reading >>

Improving Health Through Leadership And Innovation

Improving Health Through Leadership And Innovation

Diabetes What’s the Story? Diabetes is the eighth leading cause of death in New Jersey. It is the fifth leading cause among Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians; sixth among males; and eighth among Whites and females. In New Jersey, nearly 2,000 deaths each year are due to diabetes. The age-adjusted death rate due to diabetes is about 18 per 100,000 standard population. The age-adjusted death rate among males is more than double the rate among females. The rate among Blacks is much higher than that of other racial/ethnic groups but the gap is narrowing. The DOH Diabetes Prevention and Control Program seeks to reduce the health impacts of diabetes by increasing awareness of diabetes and its complications, improving the quality of diabetes care and access to care, developing partnerships and increasing community involvement to address diabetes issues, and utilizing data to better apply resources and improve health outcomes. Did you know? The rate of new adult diabetes cases is increasing in the state. In 2016, the diabetes prevalence was 9.2%. Approximately 640,000 adults have diabetes statewide. Continue reading >>

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