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Diabetes Questions And Answers

The Pathogenesis And Treatments Of Diabetes, Questions And Answers

The Pathogenesis And Treatments Of Diabetes, Questions And Answers

Diabetes Mellitus is an old disease but modern epidemics . Despite many improvements and benefits of diabetes mellitus treatments recently, many new and unresolved problems relevant to diabetes mellitus pathogenesis and therapy have been found; Pathogenesis and treatments study of diabetes currently is complicated and imperfect. Disease complications, such as cardiovascular symptoms, vision impairments, nephropathy , chronic leg infections etc are even more fatal than hyperglycemia control; Moreover, drug toxicities owing to long-term utilization of many chemical agents and drugs are equally harmful for patients. Furthermore, different doctors and drug manufactures hold different views on diabetes mellitus treatment options and financial interesting distributions. In this editorial, new ideas for building update diabetes mellitus therapeutic systems, new drug development pipelines and experimental and clinical models, possible future directions are proposed, addressed and highlighted. Diabetes Mellitus is an old disease but modern epidemics. Despite many improvements and benefits of diabetes mellitus treatments recently, many new and unresolved problems relevant to diabetes mellitus pathogenesis and therapy have been found; Pathogenesis and treatments study of diabetes currently is complicated and imperfect. Disease complications, such as cardiovascular symptoms, vision impairments, nephropathy , chronic leg infections etc are even more fatal than hyperglycemia control; Moreover, drug toxicities owing to long-term utilization of many chemical agents and drugs are equally harmful for patients. Furthermore, different doctors and drug manufactures hold different views on diabetes mellitus treatment options and financial interesting distributions. In this editorial, new id Continue reading >>

Your Questions Answered

Your Questions Answered

Q. Does eating too many sweet things give you diabetes? A. No, a person cannot get diabetes from eating too many sweet things. However, being very overweight or obese is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes, and having too many high-calorie, sugar-laden foods in your diet increases the likelihood that you will gain weight. In addition, having a close relative with diabetes increases your risk of developing the condition yourself, and obesity and physical inactivity further increase this risk in people who are already genetically susceptible. Q. If you have an urge to eat sweet things does that indicate diabetes? A. No. Having an urge to eat sweet things is not a symptom of diabetes. Key symptoms to watch out for include needing to urinate often, being excessively thirsty or feeling generally tired. An intense hunger can also signal diabetes, although this may not necessarily be for sweet foods. While all of these symptoms may be quite noticeable in type 1 diabetes, often people with type 2 diabetes may not notice any symptoms at all. Q. Is diabetes infectious or contagious? A. No. You cannot catch diabetes from another person, nor is there any risk of passing it to another person if you yourself suffer from diabetes. However, having diabetes seems to impair your body's ability to fight infection, so you are more at risk of a variety of other problems including vaginal Candida ('thrush'), wound infections and foot infections. Q. I've heard that lifestyle factors can increase a person's risk for diabetes: is it my fault if I have diabetes? A. It is thought that diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. If you have a close relative with diabetes, you are more likely to develop the condition yourself. Certain environmental factors suc Continue reading >>

Exercise: Good Questions (and Answers)

Exercise: Good Questions (and Answers)

You don't have to cover 26 miles on foot in order to be called an athlete. You aren't required to crest a mountain or navigate a winding road on two wheels before you're considered physically fit. And just because your doctor told you to get more exercise doesn't mean you need to plug away at the gym for hours and hours on end. Sure, your best friend may run 6 miles a day, but you might get what you need from a brisk walk around the neighborhood. In fact, research shows that almost any physical activity is good activity when it comes to your health. Being active protects against cardiovascular disease and stroke, helps the lungs and heart work at peak performance, fights high cholesterol and high blood pressure, lessens arthritis pain, prevents falls in older adults, relieves stress, combats osteoporosis, and encourages weight loss. Exercising may also help you get a better night's sleep, revive a lagging libido, keep you healthier after a heart attack, and even improve your mood. For people with diabetes, exercise is even more of a boon, since it can lower blood glucose levels and improve insulin sensitivity. If you've just been diagnosed and wonder how you'll get in shapeor if you've had diabetes for a long time but still want to be more activethere's no time like the present. "Don't use diabetes as an excuse not to exercise. Use it as an excuse to exercise," says Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, an exercise physiologist and professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University and author of Diabetic Athlete's Handbook. To help you launch a successful fitness plan, we grilled the experts on the basics of exercising with diabetes. A reader tells his story of learning to manage diabetes during exercise, here. Everyone, not just people with diabetes, needs to exercise regularl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions

Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions

Treatment usually involves weight loss, exercise , and medication. Daily treatment helps control diabetes and may reduce the risk of complications. The two types of diabetes , insulin -dependent (type 1) and noninsulin-dependent (type 2), are different disorders. While the causes, short-term effects, and treatments for the two types differ, both can cause the same long-term health problems. Both types also affect the body's ability to use digested food for energy. Diabetes doesn't interfere with digestion, but it does prevent the body from using an important product of digestion, glucose (commonly known as sugar), for energy. After a meal the digestive system breaks some food down into sugar. The blood carries the sugar throughout the body, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In response to this rise the hormone insulin is released into the bloodstream to signal the body tissues to metabolize or burn the sugar for fuel, causing blood sugar levels to return to normal. A gland called the pancreas , found just behind the stomach , makes insulin . Sugar the body doesn't use right away goes to the liver , muscle, or fat for storage. In someone with diabetes, this process doesn't work correctly. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas doesn't produce insulin. This condition usually begins in childhood. People with this kind of diabetes must have daily insulin injections to survive. In people with type 2 diabetes the pancreas usually produces some insulin, but the body doesn't respond very well to the insulin signal and, therefore, doesn't metabolize the sugar properly, a condition called insulin resistance . Insulin resistance is an important factor in type 2 diabetes . Diabetes interferes with the body's use of food for energy. While type 1 and type 2 diabetes are dif Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Questions

Diabetes Mellitus Questions

Posted 22 Jul 2014 by sijijosek 1 answer Posted 3 Sep 2014 by georege_j123 1 answer I am 65 plus , having diabetes for the past 15 years . A case with unusual weakness,alopecia,mild anaemia,genetic history of diabetes mellitus,unusual loss Posted 27 Jul 2014 by neelasambandam 1 answer acase with unusual body weakness,alopecia,mild anaemia,genetic history of diabetes mellitus,abnormal momentary loss of consciousness between works(blurring of vision accompanied at that time), not undergoing any medications,indigestion,suggest the medical situation of this female subject 1. Why ACEIs are best among Antihypertensive drugs while there is diabetes mellitus concomitantly? Posted 14 Sep 2012 by mastewal abebaw 2 answers ... 2. Are osmotic diuretics used for the treatment of hypertension? 3. Oral hypoglycemic agents such as metformine and glibenclamide are administered best a) Before meal in the morning b) Before meal at mid day c) Before meal in the evening d) After meal in the morning e) After meal at mid day f) ... Continue reading >>

Answers To Diabetes Questions - Premier Healthnet

Answers To Diabetes Questions - Premier Healthnet

Dr. Gendler talks about what diabetes is. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript . Diabetes is actually a very sneaky disease. We have two types of diabetes; diabetes Type One and diabetes Type 2. Type 2 diabetes is much more common and were going to concentrate on that one today. Diabetes is the disorder of sugar digestion and does include insulin which your body is making in your pancreas. It is much more involved in the process. I want to tell you it is not only about high sugar but its also about low blood sugar as well because we have to keep our sugar in a very narrow, therapeutic window and whenever the sugar is too high or too low it is dangerous for the body and for our wellbeing. So I would like to tell you that it is very important to know some very simple things you can do to prevent yourself or just to make it better and to fight the disease if you already have it. I would like to tell you that you will definitely have to concentrate on lifestyle modification which includes diet and exercising. It was proven definitely that moderate exercising, which probably includes 30 or 40 minutes per day, three or four times/week, may prolong your life 10 years. So it is number one and if you do it and are consistent with that you are going to get some benefit. Secondly, diet. If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes, when you have abnormal blood sugar but we dont label it as diabetes yet but if you dont do anything right away you are definitely going to have diabetes. So diet is very important. First of all we have to eliminate all simple sugars. If you like to drink iced tea, try to drink unsweetened iced tea. If you liked baked products I would like to limit you that, cakes, cookies, all that is not good for you. Any starch containing products like potato Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions About Diabetes

Frequently Asked Questions About Diabetes

Contact > CDA > Information and Support Services > Frequently Asked Questions about Diabetes Frequently Asked Questions about Diabetes Have a question about diabetes? Get quick answers to the most frequently asked questions. If your question is not answered below, please feel free to call us at 1-800-BANTING (226-8464) or email us at [email protected] . I have just been recently diagnosed, what should I do? Whether you have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you can live a long and healthy life by eating healthy, being physically active, and taking medications (if prescribed) to keep your blood glucose (sugar) in your target range. Read about Treatments & Management and learn more in our Healthy Living Resources . Online tools are also available from Taking Charge of My Diabetes . Visiting a diabetes education center (DEC) is a great way to learn more about diabetes and how to manage your blood sugar. To find a DEC near you, contact Diabetes Canada by calling toll-free at 1-800-BANTING (226-8464) or email [email protected] . Diabetes can be diagnosed with different blood tests taken at a lab. Many people have no symptoms of diabetes. If you are over the age of 40 or are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, you should have you blood sugar checked. For information on the signs and symptoms and the lab values that indicate diabetes, visit Signs & Symptoms . What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes and their causes? Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune disease which affects the persons ability to make any insulin. People with type 2 diabetes do make insulin but it may not be enough, or their bodies cannot use the insulin that is made. There is no known cause for type 1 diabetes, but some things can increase a persons risk for type Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Diet Questions And Answers

Diabetes - Diet Questions And Answers

Read this article to have your questions about diabetes and diet answered. Q: Will exercise help me to control my blood glucose levels? A: Yes. Doing regular exercise such as brisk walking will certainly help to control blood glucose levels and keep weight under control. Studies have shown that regular, moderately strenuous exercise reduces the risk of diabetes in normal and overweight individuals of both sexes. The positive effect of exercise on diabetes is believed to be due to an improvement in the way insulin works in the body and in glucose transport in muscles. Also keep in mind that regular exercise lowers the risk of heart disease which is often associated with diabetes. A: Walking briskly for 4 hours a week will use up nearly 8500 kJ per week. It is also easy to stick to this level of activity to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce weight. Always have a medical checkup and an exercise tolerance test before you start doing exercise, especially if you are older. Please take care to check your insulin levels regularly and to have some carbohydrate after you have exercised to prevent hypoglycaemia. A: Ideally diabetics should not be overweight , but it is also unrealistic to set your goals too high. Generally speaking a modest loss of 10% of body weight will improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance and reduce blood cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. So be realistic when you attempt to lose weight. Start off by deciding to lose 5 kg and when you succeed, then set your next goal. A: Yes, but in moderation. Artificial or non-nutritive sweeteners as they are also called, include saccharin, cyclamate, aspartame, and sucralose. Despite the fact that the safety of some of these products has been questioned, e.g. that cyclamates may cause bladder canc Continue reading >>

Insulin And Diabetes: Your Questions Answered

Insulin And Diabetes: Your Questions Answered

Insulin and Diabetes: Your Questions Answered Insulin and Diabetes: Your Questions Answered People with diabetes often have to take insulin shots. Here are the answers to some common questions about insulin. People with diabetes often have to take insulin shots. If you or someone in your family has been diagnosed with diabetes, you may have a lot of questions about insulin. Here are some answers. What is insulin, and why is it important? Insulin is a hormone that helps your body use sugar. It is made by the pancreas, a large organ that lies behind your stomach. When you eat, your digestive system breaks the food down into simpler forms that the body can use. Most food is broken down into a form of sugar called glucose. Glucose travels through the body in the blood. Insulin helps glucose move from the bloodstream into the cells, where it can be used for energy, growth and repair. What does insulin have to do with diabetes? In healthy people, the pancreas releases the right amount of insulin to move glucose into the cells. But people with diabetes have a problem: People with type 1 diabetes don't make insulin. People with type 2 diabetes either don't make enough insulin or their bodies don't use it properly (which is called insulin resistance). Without the proper amount of insulin, glucose builds up in the blood and passes out of the body in the urine. This means the body loses its main source of energy. High blood sugar also damages the blood vessels and nerves throughout the body, which can lead to serious problems. Taking insulin shots helps correct the balance between blood sugar and insulin in the body. All people with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes take insulin. Can insulin be taken as a pill instead of a shot? No. At this ti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Interview: 30 Questions

Diabetes Interview: 30 Questions

Sometimes, working on my own can feel slightly schizophrenic. I know you have tons of questions for me. And today you’ll get some of them answered! I’ve done an interview with none other than my fabulous self. I asked myself, included the ones from you (and googled some) questions to answer. So here we go, here is the GrainBrain.ch interview with Hanna Boëthius: Beginning GrainBrain: What type of diabetes do you have? Hanna Boëthius: I have Type 1 Diabetes. GB: How long have you had diabetes? HB: I was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 2, 29 years ago now. GB: How did you manage, growing up? Did you hide your diabetes? HB: I had my moments. Up until the age of about 10, my parents had full control of the diabetes and me. That’s also when I learned how to do my own injections, which gave me a little more freedom. I can’t say I ever took pride in having diabetes before. Being a teenager with T1D was difficult for me, I wanted nothing else than to be like “everybody else”, and I felt the diabetes hindered me in that. Starting at about age 16 I started hiding the diabetes more and more, at times even ignoring it. It was a stupid move on my part, as it brought me to the ICU on the night of my high school graduation with a life-threatening DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), but luckily I survived, thanks to the excellent health care staff around me. This complete roller coaster of taking care of myself vs not doing it continued a few years after that too, purely because I didn’t achieve the results I was promised and that I was working towards. GB: Was it tough on your sibling, with you being the center of attention? HB: Oh yes, most definitely. What she actually feels about it, you’ll have to ask her, but I think she has found it very tough. GB: What was hard Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Questions And Answers With The Experts

Type 1 Diabetes: Questions And Answers With The Experts

Type 1 Diabetes: Questions and Answers with the Experts Daily type 1 diabetes (T1D) management can be challenging for adults or children living with the disease, as well as for their parents or caregivers. We asked two diabetes experts, Desmond Schatz, M.D., and Anne Peters, M.D., to share with us the most frequently asked questions they hear in their practices. Their answers will help children and adults alike learn a little more about the disease and how to help manage it better. Both Dr. Schatz and Dr. Peters have seen many people, young and old, with T1D, and they recognize that, although the diagnosis can be scary at first, with the right help and support people with T1D can live long and healthy lives. FAQs for children with T1D and their parents Desmond Schatz, M.D., is a pediatric endocrinologist, associate chair of pediatrics, and director of the Diabetes Center at the University of Florida. Dr. Schatz has treated children with T1D for 25 years, and he directs clinical trials aimed at finding a way to prevent and reverse the disease. No one in our family has diabetes, how did our child get T1D? Dr. Schatz: Up front we can say its no ones fault that your child got diabetes. We dont know what causes T1D, although we believe that it results from a complex interaction among genes, the environment, and the immune system. In the United States, the risk of getting T1D is roughly one in 300, but when one family member is affected, the risk increases to one in 20, indicating that genes are involved. But almost 90 percent of people with T1D do not have a family history of the disease. Moreover, T1D is increasing in epidemic proportions, with a 23 percent rise in the prevalence of T1D in people under 20 years old between 2001 and 2009. Worldwide, the number of youth who Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diagnosis: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Prediabetes Diagnosis: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Prediabetes Diagnosis: Diabetes Questions & Answers Q. I was recently screened for diabetes, and my fasting plasma glucose level was 91 mg/dl and my A1C was 5.6%. The A1C level got me worried, so I bought a blood glucose meter, and my monitoring results have only added to my concerns. Given my lab results, when should I be tested again for diabetes? A. Congratulations on taking a proactive approach to addressing your risk for diabetes. The results you report are not yet in the prediabetic range, which is a fasting plasma glucose level between 100 mg/dl and 125 mg/dl and an A1C level between 5.7% and 6.4%, but monitoring your blood glucose levels may help you avoid entering that stage. It is important, however, to understand when to self-monitor and what the results really indicate. Blood glucose monitoring is usually done before meals, after meals, and at bedtime. If you are checking your blood before breakfast (or after youve been fasting for at least eight hours), a desirable result is under 100 mg/dl. When youre checking your blood after you have eaten, you should wait approximately two hours and look for a result under 140 mg/dl. Generally the recommendation for people with prediabetes is to be checked for Type 2 diabetes every one to two years. However, in this case, if you are consistently using your blood glucose meter and seeing higher numbers than the thresholds listed above, you should follow up with your doctor. Additional lab testing, such as an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) , may help your doctor evaluate how your body is processing glucose. When you see your doctor, bring a log of your self-monitoring results, including the times you checked your blood glucose and, if possible, information on your physical activity and what youve been eating. One of Continue reading >>

Bariatric Surgery And Type 2 Diabetes: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Bariatric Surgery And Type 2 Diabetes: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Bariatric Surgery and Type 2 Diabetes: Diabetes Questions & Answers Q. I heard about a type of bariatric surgery being done in Brazil called ileal transposition surgery that may cure Type 2 diabetes . As I understand it, it involves moving the part of the small intestine called the ileum from the far end of the intestine to the near end, right next to the stomach. Can you comment on the success rate of this surgery and whether it might become available in the United States? A. Actually, this surgery is already being done in the United States. About five years ago, surgeons at the University of Texas in Houston began developing a trial to pilot this operation, and the first patient had the surgery done in March 2012. Since that time, three other patients have undergone the sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT) surgery, as it is known. All of the patients who had this surgery done had lived with diabetes for five or more years, and all had a glycosylated hemoglobin ( HbA1c ) level, a measure of how much glucose is in the blood, greater than 7.5% (normal is less than 6%) despite being on insulin and at least two oral medicines to treat their diabetes. We offered these patients the opportunity to have this operation under strict inclusion and exclusion criteria and under the scrutiny of an internal review board and data safety monitoring board. That is, we did it by the books to make sure the science was right and safe. All four patients had the operation successfully and without any major complications. All the surgeries were done laparoscopically (meaning that tiny instruments were inserted through small incisions to perform the operation), and the average hospital stay was about three days. The patients were followed up at one-month intervals for three cons Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faq - Quick Answers To The Most Common Questions

Type 2 Diabetes Faq - Quick Answers To The Most Common Questions

Written by Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is when your body doesnt use insulin properly. In type 2 diabetes, some people are insulin resistant, meaning that their body produces a lot of insulin but cant use it effectively.Some people with type 2 diabetes dont produce enough insulin. Type 2 is different from type 1 diabetes because in type 1, your body doesnt produce any insulin at all. Whether youre insulin resistant or have too little insulin, the end result is the same in type 2 diabetes:your blood glucose level is too high. What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop graduallyso gradually, in fact, that its possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms.Some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: For more information on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, please read our article on type 2 symptoms . Type 2 diabetes has several causes:genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones.A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesnt use insulin as well as it should.Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. To get more details on this, please read our article on the causes of type 2 diabetes . What are the risk factors for type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes has many risk factors associated with it, mostly related to lifestyle choices.But in order to develop insulin resistance (an inability for your body to use insulin as it should) and type 2 diabetes, you must also have a genetic abnormality.Along the same lines, some people with type 2 diabetes dont produce enough insulin; that is also due to a genetic abnormality. That is, not everyone can develop type 2 diabetes.Addi Continue reading >>

8 Common Diabetes Questions Answered

8 Common Diabetes Questions Answered

Health.com -- Nearly 24 million Americans have diabetes; another 57 million have prediabetes, a precursor to the disease. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that if the diabetes epidemic continues, one in three Americans will develop it in his or her lifetime. That's especially bad news for women, because the disease can affect both mother and child during pregnancy, and women with diabetes are more likely to have a heart attack (and at a younger age) than women without diabetes. Along with the worries about diabetes, there's a lot of misinformation (like skinny girls can't get the disease, or eating too much candy causes it), which is why we've gathered expert answers to the most common questions. What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. It's most often diagnosed in patients under 18, but it can strike at any age. Type 1 diabetics need insulin to manage the disease. In type 2 diabetes, the body loses its sensitivity to insulin, the hormone that helps muscles absorb and use blood sugar. Traditionally, type 2 diabetes was diagnosed in older people. But with the rise in obesity, it's now being diagnosed at younger ages, sometimes even in children. Some traditionally thin populations are also being diagnosed with the disease as well. Type 2 is generally treated with changes to diet and exercise habits, as well as oral medication or insulin. How will I know if I have diabetes? Diabetes may cause no symptoms at all, but some signs include frequent thirst and hunger, having to urinate more than usual, losing weight without trying to, fatigue, and crankiness. If you're concerned, get your blood-glucose level checked, says Deborah Fillm Continue reading >>

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