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Diabetes Protocol 101

Sick Day Diabetes Protocol

Sick Day Diabetes Protocol

Despite the warming weather , desire to be outside, and love for Spring in the air, it appears no amount of hot tea and cough syrup can appease the cold which has descended upon my sinuses. Sick days truly are the worst, especially when they come out of nowhere and unwillingly confine you to your home. What many dont realize, being sick affects blood sugars, especially in individuals with diabetes. As the body fights infection, from the common cold to a viral infection, blood sugar levels rise as a response to the stress of physical illness. The rise in blood sugar is primarily caused as the hormones cortisol and adrenalin are released by the body to combat sickness. These hormones work against insulin and lead to high blood sugars. For individuals without diabetes, a momentary increase in insulin protects the body from high blood sugars. However, with diabetes, the body is typically unable to up-regulate the amount of insulin needed to counteract the increased blood sugars. Elevated blood sugars for a long period of time can lead to complications including the production of ketones from persistently high blood sugars. Feeling sick can decrease appetite and reduce the amount of food you eat during the day. Even if you are eating less than normal, it is recommended to continue taking insulin and medication, since sickness can cause blood sugars to rise despite a lack of carbohydrates. Monitor your blood sugar levels every 4-6 hours even if you are not eating any food/carbs Continue taking your medication or insulin and talk to your doctor ahead of time about a sick day plan with your medication Increase your fluid intake as sickness and diarrhea both cause dehydration. Make a conscious effort to drink some fluids each hour even if you are feeling sick Double check cough Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas no longer produces insulin. The body needs insulin to use sugar for energy. Approximately 10 per cent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body does not effectively use the insulin that is produced. 90 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. It affects approximately 3.5 per cent of all pregnancies and involves an increased risk of developing diabetes for both mother and child. If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes can result in a variety of complications, including: The first step in avoiding the onset of these complications is recognizing the risk factors, as well as signs and symptoms that may indicate you have diabetes. Careful management of diabetes, for those living with it, can delay or even prevent complications. Risk factors for developing diabetes include the following: A member of a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian or African descent) Overweight (especially if you carry most of your weight around your middle) A parent, brother or sister with diabetes Health complications that are associated with diabetes (see above under "Is diabetes serious?") Given birth to a baby that weighed more than 4 kg (9 lb) at birth Had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) High cholesterol or other fats in the blood Having been diagnosed with any of the following: Acanthosis nigricans (darkened patches of skin) Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Trouble getting or maintaining an erection It is important to recognize, however, that ma Continue reading >>

Portland Diabetes Project Frequently Asked Questions

Portland Diabetes Project Frequently Asked Questions

I. The Portland Protocol history II. General information III. Patient population and guidelines for use IV. Administrative and nursing issues V. Transitioning patients VI. Checking glucose levels: frequency and methods? VII. Miscellaneous questions VIII. Reference articles and abstracts Portland Protocol – History What is The Portland Protocol? A. The Portland Protocol is a tight perioperative glucose control regimen using continuous insulin infusion in diabetic patients undergoing open heart surgery. What are the origins of tight glycemic control protocols? A. Tight glycemic control protocols started because of the direct relationships that have been discovered between hyperglycemia and adverse in-hospital outcomes. Increasing hyperglycemia has been independently shown to cause increased infection rates, increased mortality in CABG patients, and increased length of stay. Conversely, tight glycemic control protocols have been shown to independently reduce in-hospital mortality, LOS, and infection rates. The Portland Diabetic Project was the first to elucidate these findings with publications starting in 1995. Other publications from our center followed in 1997, 1999, 2000 and 2003. Corroborating data from other centers began to appear in 2000. Since then there has been an explosion of interest in tight glycemic control. There are currently several glycemic control protocols available. Ours, known as "The Portland Protocol," has been in use since 1992. Over the past 14 years, it has been repeatedly modified and honed to provide what we believe is the tightest, most efficient, and safest tight glycemic control of any protocol available. The incidence of hypoglycemia < 60 mg/dl with our 70 – 110 mg/dl protocol is 1.5 percent (safety index), while 91 percent of the pati Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

The adoption and maintenance of physical activity are critical foci for blood glucose management and overall health in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recommendations and precautions vary depending on individual characteristics and health status. In this Position Statement, we provide a clinically oriented review and evidence-based recommendations regarding physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes. Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use, whereas exercise is planned, structured physical activity. Exercise improves blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes, reduces cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to weight loss, and improves well-being (1,2). Regular exercise may prevent or delay type 2 diabetes development (3). Regular exercise also has considerable health benefits for people with type 1 diabetes (e.g., improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity, etc.) (4). The challenges related to blood glucose management vary with diabetes type, activity type, and presence of diabetes-related complications (5,6). Physical activity and exercise recommendations, therefore, should be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. TYPES AND CLASSIFICATIONS OF DIABETES AND PREDIABETES Physical activity recommendations and precautions may vary by diabetes type. The primary types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (5%–10% of cases) results from cellular-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells, producing insulin deficiency (7). Although it can occur at any age, β-cell destruction rates vary, typically occurring more rapidly in youth than in adults. Type 2 diabetes (90%–95% of cases) resul Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Highs, Lows, And

Diabetes: The Highs, Lows, And "when Can They Go's"

Diabetic emergencies come in a variety of types and causes, but the tools available to EMS professionals allow excellent evaluation and initial treatment of the patient. For most EMS professionals, the evaluation of emergency patients with diabetes is built around a protocol for "Patients with Mental Status Changes who are Known or Suspected Diabetic." A good history from the patient or knowledgeable bystanders, an assessment of the vital signs, and a physical evaluation that looks for all potential causes of altered mental status, are the first elements of managing patients with this problem. The information then provided by testing a very small amount of blood will provide the approximate level of glucose in the patient's vascular system, and treatment can then be targeted to restore the patient's normal level of functioning. At the hospital, further testing may need to be done to establish the cause of the blood sugar abnormality, or whether there are other significant medical problems. The process begins with the request by a patient or others who have noted the person acting abnormally. This can be family, friends, co-workers, teachers, police officers, or just a passerby. Beginning with the history and examination, the EMS professional can make a decision that the patient has a medical presentation consistent with an abnormal blood sugar. In a known diabetic, the patient, family, or friends may describe the patient as having symptoms that are consistent with high or low blood sugar (usually when they have seen this patient act like this in the past). The medic will then make proper use of the blood glucose evaluation tool utilized by the EMS organization. It is probably unnecessary for EMS to test for blood sugar if the patient has had a valid blood sugar test don Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Protocol Guide Help Cure Your Diabetes?

Can Diabetes Protocol Guide Help Cure Your Diabetes?

Diabetes Protocol makes some lofty promises. Diabetes Protocol promises to cure your type 2 diabetes or type 1 diabetes. Thats right: cure it. Not just treat the symptoms or temporarily regulate your blood glucose levels. So it makes sense that people are skeptical. Whats the truth behind Diabetes Protocol? Is Diabetes Protocol a scam? Or is it a revolutionary solution that is being suppressed by Big Pharma like its creator wants you to think? The truth is somewhere in between. But I will tell you one thing: Diabetes Protocol can change the lives of anyone who suffers from type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes, or has been diagnosed as pre-diabetic. Today, Im going to explain how it works, if it works, and help you decide if its worth spending $40. Diabetes Protocol is an 138 page downloadable guide that lists various health, fitness, and lifestyle tips you can use to cure diabetes. The guide is available in the form of a PDF eBook. You buy it online and its instantly sent to your email inbox. There are three modules included within the guide, including: Core Module: The Core Module will tackle the root cause of your diabetes, including the exact natural systems you can activate within your body to beat diabetes (well talk about how it works below). Module 2: In this module, youll learn a vast collection of natural, safe, and effective remedies to control blood sugar, including basic natural ingredients like rosemary and oregano. Module 3: This module explains the dangers of certain popular diabetes medications which many people take every day to treat their diabetes, when in reality, theyre making symptoms worse. You also get two bonus modules, including 500 Delicious Diabetic Recipes and 7-Day Energy Booster. Those extra books are tossed in for free, which is a nice added Continue reading >>

Diabetes Protocol Book Pdf Free Download

Diabetes Protocol Book Pdf Free Download

TheDiabetes Protocol download in PDF format. Feel free to share Kenneth Pullmans book with your followers on Twitter.Sensation! You can cure diabetes in a few weeks. Watch this video presentation of TheDiabetes Protocol book. You will not believe, but it is a fact; you can rid of diabetes! Just a few similar sensation in the science can change the world and this video changing lives of many people. No, it is not a commercial; this is a very important and useful information. Watch the video, click on share button, comment and share this video with your friends and family with everybody who have a diabetes type I or II. You can be cured in a few days. This is possible even if you change only a part of your nutrition; by adding a rough food to your diet you can drastically change your health. This revolutionary cure from the Diabetes Protocol program can help to the overweight people, people with diabetes or cardiovascular problems, cancer or any other chronically diseases. Hundreds of people were sentenced to take medications during whole life, but they could give up from allopathic medications, lose weight, break emotional barriers and become more active just in 30 days! All this with the help of the Diabetes Protocol system. By the way, long time ago was filmed a documentary movie about rejuvenation center located in Patagonia, Arizona. This is a report about real scientific tests and results of one group of people who were cured of diabetes in 30 days with the help of rough, fresh food. This educational documentary movie providing very interesting information about results of eating a rough food. If you are not a follower of rough eating then in this center they will change your thinking about this kind of food. Thanks to this movie, I become sure that if you pull you Continue reading >>

Honest Review Of The Diabetes Protocol Program

Honest Review Of The Diabetes Protocol Program

Honest Review of the Diabetes Protocol Program Diabetes Protocol Review While most people are aware of the seriousness of diabetes, few are exposed to the regular annoyances that diabetics face – the monitoring of food intake, the insulin shots, the oral medication, the side effects, and so on. To say their lives are easy would be a very misguided statement. So when a product is marketed as a cure for the effects of diabetes, heads will naturally turn. The product I’m speaking of is Diabetes Protocol. The major appeal of Diabetes Protocol is its claims to drastically lower glucose levels and reverse the effects of diabetes in only 19 days. Skepticism is always present when such claims are made, but I’m willing to give someone the benefit of the doubt when I hear something that appeals to me. And this product appealed to me. So below, I wanted to share with you a bit of what I know about Diabetes Protocol – including what it is, who created it, and how it works. And hopefully, what I share with you will help you make an informed decision on whether to buy this product. What is Diabetes Protocol? Diabetes Protocol is a guide/meal plan created by Dr. Kenneth Pullman that focuses on reversing the effects of diabetes via lowering the liver and kidney’s production of glucose. However, it’s more than just another meal plan guide. It seeks to rid your body of diabetes while freeing you to live a more normal life – which means eating “good stuff” again (pizza, ice cream, fries, etc.), no insulin shots, and no oral medication. The guide itself outlines the specific 19-day process that Dr. Pullman used to lower his own blood sugar levels from a reported 270 to 100. This plan is his contribution to helping increase diabetics’ resistance to diabetes-related issue Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner's Guide

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner's Guide

The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet that offers many health benefits. Over 20 studies show that this type of diet can help you lose weight and improve health (1). Ketogenic diets may even have benefits against diabetes, cancer, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (2, 3, 4, 5). This article is a detailed beginner's guide to the ketogenic diet. It contains everything you need to know. The ketogenic diet (often termed keto) is a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares many similarities with the Atkins and low-carb diets. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. The reduction in carbs puts your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When this happens, your body becomes incredibly efficient at burning fat for energy. It also turns fat into ketones in the liver, which can supply energy for the brain (6, 7). Ketogenic diets can cause massive reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels. This, along with the increased ketones, has numerous health benefits (6, 8, 9, 10, 11). The ketogenic diet (keto) is a low-carb, high-fat diet. It lowers blood sugar and insulin levels, and shifts the body’s metabolism away from carbs and towards fat and ketones. There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including: Standard ketogenic diet (SKD): This is a very low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat diet. It typically contains 75% fat, 20% protein and only 5% carbs (1). Cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD): This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days. Targeted ketogenic diet (TKD): This diet allows you to add carbs around workouts. High-protein ketogenic diet: This is similar to a standard ketogenic diet, but includes more protein. The ratio is often 60% fat, 35% protein and 5% Continue reading >>

Diabetes Protocol Program Review: Does Dr Kenneth Pullman Diabetes Protocol Work?

Diabetes Protocol Program Review: Does Dr Kenneth Pullman Diabetes Protocol Work?

The issue of diabetes is growing at a high rate globally each day and it has resulted in many things, to some amputation and to some death. This disease also has put tears in so many families even fear in some people. One of these people is a health researcher by the name Dr Kenneth Pullman who dedicated his vast knowledge of science to finding the cure to Diabetes. After years of hard work he came up with a protocol that reverses the disease, this protocol he called the Diabetes Protocol Program. If you are already familiar with Dr Pullman Diabetes Protocol program and only here to download it, you can do so by clicking the link below What is Diabetes Protocol Program? Dr Kenneth Pullman discovered that many people don’t look for the cause of the disease all they pay attention to is nurturing and controlling it. This has resulted in people spending huge amount of money on expensive medications that does not really deal with the original cause of diabetes. He noted that increasing the body insulin is not the best way of treating diabetes. He then came up with his own belief that increasing insulin or those insulin shots you take is not necessary and that another method entirely can be used. He discovered that if you are pre-diabetic or you have either the type 1 or type 2 diabetes and you carefully follow the Diabetes Protocol program you can be 100% free from diabetes in about 19 days. Dr Kenneth Pullman’s research showed that various enzymes and protein in the liver and kidney are responsible for the production of glucose into the bloodstream. Many researches has shown that insulin is responsible for the glucose produced in the body. He discovered that insulin is not really responsible for all glucose production, he then discovered other protein and enzymes that c Continue reading >>

Intensive Care Unit Insulin Delivery Algorithms: Why So Many? How To Choose?

Intensive Care Unit Insulin Delivery Algorithms: Why So Many? How To Choose?

Intensive Care Unit Insulin Delivery Algorithms: Why So Many? How to Choose? 1Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 2Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 1Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 2Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 1Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 2Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 1Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 2Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 3University Children's Hospital, University Children's Hospital, Charit, Berlin, Germany 4Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California 5Yale School of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Correspondence to: Garry M. Steil, Ph.D., Children's Hospital Boston Medicine Critical Care Program, Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston and Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115; email address [email protected] Funding: Work for the present article was supported by a grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute via R01HL88448 (MA). Copyright 2009 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Studies showing improved outcomes with tight glycemic control in the intensive care unit (ICU) have resulted in a substantial number of new insulin delivery algorithms being proposed. The present study highlights mechanisms used in the better-known approaches, examines what might be critical differences among them, and uses systems theory to characterize the conditions under which ea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technologycontinuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy And Continuous Glucose Monitoring In Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

Diabetes Technologycontinuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy And Continuous Glucose Monitoring In Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Diabetes TechnologyContinuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline Keck School of Medicine (A.L.P.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033; Search for other works by this author on: Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center (A.J.A.), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Medicine (T.B.), University of Ljubljana and University Childrens Hospital, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia; Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine and Diabetes Care Center (A.E., I.B.H.), University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195; Search for other works by this author on: Mayo Clinic Evidence-based Practice Center (M.H.M.), Rochester, Minnesota 55905; Search for other works by this author on: UF Diabetes Institute (W.E.W.), University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611; Search for other works by this author on: Joslin Diabetes Center (H.W.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 101, Issue 11, 1 November 2016, Pages 39223937, Anne L. Peters, Andrew J. Ahmann, Tadej Battelino, Alison Evert, Irl B. Hirsch, M. Hassan Murad, William E. Winter, Howard Wolpert; Diabetes TechnologyContinuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology Continue reading >>

Clinical Pointers: Blood Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

Clinical Pointers: Blood Glucose Control In Type 2 Diabetes

Clinical pointers: Blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes Get up to speed with recent developments. The module covers the 2015 NICE type 2 diabetes guideline, how to set appropriate HbA1c targets, and a stepwise approach to medication, including the role of newer drugs such as SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists. After completing this module, you should know: How to adjust HbA1c targets to take account of the patients individual circumstances The importance of taking a stepwise approach to escalation of glucose lowering treatments, with timely intensification of therapy for those who fail to meet blood glucose targets The latest evidence on efficacy and safety of the newer agents, including SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists The key practice changing points relating to blood glucose control from the 2015 NICE guideline on type 2 diabetes. Biography : Stephen Gough is visiting professor of diabetes and honorary consultant physician, University of Oxford and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford Centre for Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolism, UK. Disclosure : I have received personal honoraria for lectures and advisory boards from Novo Nordisk, Lilly, Sanofi, GSK, Takeda, BI, MSD and Astra Zeneca. I have also received research grants paid to my university and/or NHS trust from Novo Nordisk, Lilly, Takeda and Sanofi. Since working on the first draft of this module, I have taken up a position with Novo Nordisk in Copenhagen as senior principal clinical scientist in research and development. Biography : Archana Dhere is a specialist registrar in diabetes and endocrinology at the Oxford Deanery, UK. She is a member of the Royal College of Physicians (UK). She is a clinical research fellow at the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and M Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a daily challenge. There are so many variables to keep in mind -- food, exercise, stress, general health, etc. -- that keeping blood sugar levels in the desired range is a constant balancing act. We want to make managing diabetes easier. So, the DRI's Education Team hasdeveloped short brochures about the topics listed below -- offering useful tips on many of the day-to-day issues facing people living with diabetes. And, most of the materials are offered in English and Spanish. If you can benefit by learning about one or more of these subjects, just click on the title to expand. Do you know what foods have the greatest impact on your blood sugars? If you answered CARBOHYDRATE FOODS...youre right! Carbohydrates -- "carbs" -- are broken down into glucose. So if you eat too much of them, your blood sugar level may rise. For this reason, people with diabetes find it helpful to keep track of the carbs they eat in order to manage their blood sugars. Carb counting is easy. It just takes some practice at first. Caring for older people with diabetes requires special thought and consideration. The older individual is more likely to have other health problems and may be taking a variety of different medications. Many people are frightened to check their blood sugar -- or "blood glucose" -- levels because they do not want to see levels that are higher or lower than their target range. But, checking blood sugar at home, in school, and in the workplace is key to managing diabetes. It puts you in control of your diabetes. Remember, your blood sugar levels remain the same whether you know about them or not. Checking blood sugar levels is the most accurate way to see if your lifestyle changes and medications are helping you to better manage your diabetes. If levels Continue reading >>

Clinical Features And Treatment Of Maturity Onset Diabetes Of The Young (mody)

Clinical Features And Treatment Of Maturity Onset Diabetes Of The Young (mody)

Clinical features and treatment of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) 1Department of Endocrinology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore 2Department of Endocrinology, National University Hospital, Singapore Correspondence: Daphne SL Gardner, Department of Endocrinology, Singapore General Hospital, Block 6, Level 6, Outram Road, Singapore 169608, Tel +65 6321 4523, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2012 Gardner and Tai, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a heterogeneous group of disorders that result in -cell dysfunction. It is rare, accounting for just 1%2% of all diabetes. It is often misdiagnosed as type 1 or type 2 diabetes, as it is often difficult to distinguish MODY from these two forms. However, diagnosis allows appropriate individualized care, depending on the genetic etiology, and allows prognostication in family members. In this review, we discuss features of the common causes of MODY, as well as the treatment and diagnosis of MODY. Keywords: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, HNF1A, HNF4A, HNF1B, GCK Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) was a term first used in the 1970s 1 , 2 to describe inheritable diabetes distinct from type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (noninsulin-dependent) diabetes. In these initial reports, MODY patients displayed a familial form of noninsulin-dependent diabetes, which showed autosomal dominant inheritance and which typically presented before the age of 25 years. The molecular genetic basis of MODY was subsequent Continue reading >>

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