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Diabetes Program Names

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

The YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, part of the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program, is a yearlong program consisting of 25 classroom sessions delivered over the course of one year. A trained Lifestyle Coach helps participants learn strategies for healthy eating, physical activity, and other lifestyle changes. Currently, 86 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes, yet only 10 percent realize they are at risk. Having prediabetes means a person has elevated blood glucose levels that are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. While only a blood test by a doctor can can confirm prediabetes, a person's family history, weight and high cholesterol levels are just a few of the factors that can put an individual in the high-risk category. The goal of the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program is to improve overall health and to help those with prediabetes understand the risks and options to learn new behaviors that last a lifetime. Programs like the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program have been shown to reduce the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent in adults and as much as 71 percent in those over the age of 60. To qualify for the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program an individual must be at least 18 years old, overweight with a BMI greater than or equal to 25 and diagnosed with prediabetes or at high risk for diabetes. The YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program uses a CDC approved curriculum and is part of the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program. A Y membership is not required for participation in the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program. Cost $429 / 12-payments of $33.75. Financial assistance is available. Our next group will be starting soon. For More Information: Kate Kevern [email protected] 541-686-9622 Continue reading >>

Taglines/names - Catchy Name For Diabetes Education Programme From Anonymous: Marketingprofs Question 39944

Taglines/names - Catchy Name For Diabetes Education Programme From Anonymous: Marketingprofs Question 39944

Search more Know-How Exchange Q&A from Marketing Experts This question has been answered, and points have been awarded. Catchy Name For Diabetes Education Programme Posted by Anonymous on 8/27/2012 at 2:13 AM ET 250 Points I am launching an diabetes education programme (1 year course) especially or Physicians, later on will go for paramedics education too, kindly suggest me appropriate name for the same. I will be very thankful to you all. Posted by Jay Hamilton-Roth on 8/27/2012 at 8:57 AM Accepted What will you be teaching that's new/different for your audiences? Posted by Gary Bloomer on 8/27/2012 at 12:26 PM Accepted Promise me you will never ever use that word - catchy - again. It is probably the most overused and meaningless word ever created. What you want is not a "catchy" name but a name to which your potential customers can easily relate to, a name that says "I can solve your problems." That's what captures their eyes and their minds, not "catchy." Posted by Gary Bloomer on 8/27/2012 at 2:49 PM Member Phil ... I've given up on warning against the use of the word "catchy" ... I've even stopped using the phrase "Catchy is not a selling strategy" ... a questioner last week (the photographic backdrop person) sent me three e-mails, each worse in tone and verbal attack than the last ... in which I was called a jerk, in which my politics were questioned (WTF?) and in which I was told in no uncertain terms that the questioner didn't want any "stupid marketing advice" and that all that was needed was a "catchy name". I've almost reached the point where I no longer want to contribute to the forum, let alone to comment on names. Because the content offered here is free, I fee that people submitting questions value it less. Posted on 8/28/2012 at 3:59 AM Author I am extr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Services - Crozer-keystone Health System - Pa

Diabetes Services - Crozer-keystone Health System - Pa

Diabetes is a disease that causes glucose (sugar) to build up in the bloodstream due to a lack of insulin. Since glucose supplies our bodies with the energy required to do everyday tasks, a variety of health problems can ensue if its not able to get into our cells. Recent studies show that the incidence of diabetes is on the rise in the U.S. Our goal is to educate our patients about managing their diabetes and preventing long term complications. An American Diabetes Association (ADA) recognized diabetes program, the Center for Diabetes provides outpatient education for individuals with new onset or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, or for those who desire intensive control. Our Certified Diabetes Educators include: a nurse, a registered dietician, a pharmacist, and an exercise physiologist, under the guidance of a medical director, will work with you to develop an educational plan to meet your specific needs. Crozer-Keystone offers a wide variety of individual and small group classes, as well as counseling to help you manage your condition, reach your goals and maintain a healthy, happy lifestyle. Topic covered: overview of diabetes; possible causes, symptoms, recommended action for hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia; benefits of exercise; overview of medications and foot care. Review American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines: blood sugar goals, Hemoglobin A1c, and Standards of Care. The Diabetes Nutrition Counseling at The Center for Diabetes provides a comprehensive review and discussion to help patients understand and manage their diabetes through healthy eating. This is a two hour class for those who have completed an ADA program, need a refresher or desire nutrition education only. An individual meal plan will be provided. After you complete your initial Diabetes c Continue reading >>

The Y : Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

The Y : Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

More than 200 Ys across the country help thousands of people reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes with YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program. This small-group program helps people with prediabetes eat healthier, increase their physical activityand lose weight, which can delay or even prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic disease that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people. A condition calledprediabetesoccurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. More than 86 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes has no cure, but prediabetes can be reversed. Chances are you know at least one person with diabetes and probably more than one with prediabetes. To find out if you are at risk, take this quick test . Then share the test with friends and family. If you find out you or someone you know is at risk for developing diabetes, the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can help. Find out if a Y near you runs the program . Continue reading >>

Rural Project Examples: Diabetes

Rural Project Examples: Diabetes

Need: To help people with chronic conditions learn how to manage their health. Intervention: A small-group 6-week workshop for individuals with chronic conditions to learn skills and strategies to manage their health. Results: Participants have better health and quality of life, including reduction in pain, fatigue, and depression. Project ECHO Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes Need: To increase the capacity for more effective treatment of chronic, complex conditions in rural and underserved communities. Intervention: Through a specially-designed project, remote primary care providers work with academic specialists as a team to manage chronic conditions of rural patients, expanding remote providers knowledge base through shared case studies. Results: Patient management and care provided by rural providers through ongoing education and mentoring from Project ECHO has proved as effective as treatment provided by specialists at a university medical center. Need: To reduce health disparities in two rural/frontier counties in southwest New Mexico. Intervention: Community health workers work with clients to help them better manage their health and promote awareness of healthy lifestyle options in the community. Results: Better health outcomes for patients. Need: Rural Appalachian Kentucky residents have deficits in health resources and health status, including high levels of cancer, heart disease, hypertension, asthma, and diabetes. Intervention: Kentucky Homeplace was created as a community health worker initiative to address the lifestyle choices, inadequate health insurance, and environmental factors that are believed to contribute to these diseases. Results: From July 2001 to June 2016, over 152,262 rural residents have been served. Preventive health strategies Continue reading >>

Diabetes Wellness Program - Minges Wellness Center

Diabetes Wellness Program - Minges Wellness Center

The Diabetes Wellness program, located in the Minnie P. Stackhouse Diabetes Center is a 6 month programgeared towards supporting individuals with lifestyle choices, changes, and challenges.Physician referral to the program is required and can be done by callingthe program at 252-522-7616. The Diabetes Wellness Program offers a community site at the Kinston Community Health Center( KCHC) . Services at KCHC include free disease management classes focusing on the American Association of Diabetes Educators sevenhealthy behaviors taught by a diabetes educator. Education is also provided for individuals with pre-diabetes and gestational diabetes. Information can be obtained by calling 252-522-4350, extension 311. Sandra has been a nurse with Lenoir Memorial Hospital for 21 years and has worked with the Diabetes Wellness Program since 2007, providing education to individuals living with diabetes and motivating them to manage their disease with positive changes in their daily life. Program Coordinator Certified Diabetes Educator Connie has been employed with Lenoir Memorial Hospital for 25 years in a variety of educator roles. Her specialty includes the LinkLine Specialist position, assist with the Diabetes program and enjoys assisting the members in the Wellness Center gym in their journey to improve their unique health and fitness endeavors. Group Fitness Instructor / Program Assistant Holly holds a BS in Exercise Science and a BS in Nutrition from ECU. She worked as an exercise specialist at Vidant Wellness Center and most recently as a Clinical Dietitian for the Department of Public Safety. She enjoys helping people get healthier through exercise and nutrition. Jessi Herring, RN joined the team in 2016 and is working in the Diabetes Wellness Program as a diabetes educator. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes | Diabetes Program | Dartmouth-hitchcock

Type 1 Diabetes | Diabetes Program | Dartmouth-hitchcock

Alternative names: Juvenile Diabetes, Child-Onset Diabetes, Juvenile-Onset Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus In type 1 diabetes, the body's own immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. The result is an extreme lack of or absence of insulin, a hormone that is necessary for life, because it allows the body to be able to use sugar. Sugar is the basic fuel for the cells in the body, and insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop quickly, over days or weeks. They may include: Being unusually thirsty, and having a dry mouth Feeling extremely tired and without energy Losing weight despite an increased appetite Having wounds that take a long time to heal If a person with type 1 diabetes is not diagnosed and treated, he or she can fall into a dangerous diabetic coma (diabetic ketoacidosis). In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that make the hormone, insulin. Normally, insulin moves sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into the rest of the body, where the sugar is used as fuel. In a diabetic, that sugar builds up in the bloodstream instead of being used by the body. Without insulin, a diabetic may feel hungry and listless, even if he or she just ate. Doctors do not know what causes the body's immune system to attack the cells in the pancreas. In some cases, a person may develop type 1 diabetes after being exposed to an "environmental trigger," such as an unidentified virus. Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in people younger than 30. How does my doctor tell if I have type 1 diabetes? In order to diagnose type 1 diabetes, your doctor will check the sugar, or glucose, levels in your blood. The fasting plasma glucose test is the most common test, and Continue reading >>

Provider Resources | Diabetes Prevention And Control

Provider Resources | Diabetes Prevention And Control

Diabetes Prevention and Control: Resources for Providers Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs Programs Recognized in Alaska by the American Diabetes Association: Sponsoring Organization: Providence Alaska Medical Center Site/Program Name: Providence Diabetes and Nutrition Center Sponsoring Organization: State of Alaska DHSS DPH Site/Program Name: Southcentral Foundation Sponsoring Organization: Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation Site/Program Name: Diabetes Self-Management Education Sponsoring Organization: Fairbanks Memorial Hospital Site/Program Name: Fairbanks Diabetes Center Sponsoring Organization: Tanana Chiefs Conference Site/Program Name: Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center Sponsoring Organization: State of Alaska DHSS DPH Site/Program Name: Bartlett Diabetes Education Program Address: Bartlett Regional Hospital 3260 Hospital Dr. Sponsoring Organization: PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Site/Program Name: PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Diabetes Education Services Sponsoring Organization: Gloria Scalzo, RD Site/Program Name: Diabetes Self Management Consultants Sponsoring Organization: State of Alaska DHSS DPH Site/Program Name: Sitka Community Hospital DSME Program Sponsoring Organization: Central Peninsula Hospital _______________________________________________________ These websites offer accredited continuing education courses on line for provider groups as indicated. Fee information is listed at the site. A catalogue of CE websites was developed and is maintained by Bernard Sklar, MD, MS, if you didnt find what you needed above. This list includes many of the major journals specifically related to diabetes and diabetes care and many of the major public health journals. Additional journals with diabetes-specific information are included in the Continue reading >>

Build A Program ~ Developing A Diabetes Self Management Program

Build A Program ~ Developing A Diabetes Self Management Program

Integrating Self Management in Primary Care Programs for self management do not prosper if they rely on the heroic efforts of a few staff members. Rather, organizational factors and system features need to facilitate consistent and high-quality provision of self management support. The Diabetes Initiative identified key characteristics of self management support in primary care and developed a tool that can be used by teams wishing to improve self management supports in their settings. Clinics, community organizations, and other groups can develop partnerships to extend the range and variety of opportunities and supports for self management. These reflect the reality that diabetes management takes place in daily life, not in clinics. The Diabetes Initiative identified key characteristics of effective partnerships and developed tools to help track their progression and improve outcomes. Managing negative emotions is important in diabetes management. A range of strategies to address these include support groups, self management classes, supportive community health workers, counselors on the diabetes care team, medication, and as-needed referral care. But healthy coping isnt just for people with depression. All individuals can benefit from improving their coping skills, and all 14 Diabetes Initiative grantees incorporated this aspect of self management into their programs. For more information on healthy coping, download Healthy Coping in Diabetes: A Guide for Program Development and Implementation . When patients have questions about their diabetes they need convenient access to someone they can talk to. At the same time, they need to be contacted periodically to see how they are doing, even if they havent checked in with their diabetes team. Thus, routine contacts by th Continue reading >>

Lourdes Diabetes Education Program

Lourdes Diabetes Education Program

Knowledge is power in combating diabetes. Patients who have diabetes have to manage their own daily care , but dealing with this complex disease can seem overwhelming at times-for anyone. Though healthcare providers can set up the treatment plan, the patient must carry it out, making important decisions about diet, exercise, and medication, including insulin. Lourdes Diabetes Education Program helps patient learn to confidently handle this self-care and its related concerns. The Diabetes Prevention program, launched in 2009, serves: individuals who know they are at risk for the diabetes or concerned about their level of risk; patients newly diagnosed with the diabetes; and patients who have been coping with the disease for many years. Lourdes is contacting physicians and reaching out to patients to increase awareness of this program The program offers these education modules to choose from: Lourdes makes the education program available in four locations: Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, Camden, NJ Lourdes Medical Center of Burlington County, Willingboro, NJ LourdesCare at Cherry Hill, Cherry Hill, NJ Weight and family history are among very important factors in determining who develops the disease. Participants in a quality diabetes-education program can better understand their status and act on that knowledge, knowing that the more they invest in managing the disease the more they can take control of it.. No matter how high their risk, patients do have the chance to avoid this disease by taking the right steps. And those that have diabetes can keep it in check, bring down its severity, or sometimes put it into remission. All this, though, takes sacrifice and commitment. Registered nurses who are certified diabetes educators lead the Diabetes Education Program at Lo Continue reading >>

Vanderbilt Diabetes - Diabetes Self-management Class - Vanderbilt Health Nashville, Tn

Vanderbilt Diabetes - Diabetes Self-management Class - Vanderbilt Health Nashville, Tn

Welcome to the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program at Vanderbilt. Our program helps people with diabetes who: Have had diabetes for a long time but want an update Need ideas for living a healthier lifestyle Want to stay healthy and avoid problems that can happen with diabetes To join the program, you'll need a referral from your health care provider. The American Diabetes Association has recognized our program as meeting national standards for diabetes self-management education and support. You will meet with other diabetes patients to talk about how to take better care of yourself. Your group leaders will be registered nurses and registered dietitians who are Certified Diabetes Educators and have worked with diabetes patients for many years. Here are some of the things that you might talk about in one of our diabetes classes: How to handle feelings about living with diabetes How better food choices and staying active can help diabetes Things that make it hard to live with diabetes What to do about high and low blood sugars Having a support network to help reach goals What happens over time when you have diabetes Different types of diabetes medicines and how they work Other tests you may need to help keep you healthy Each class lasts about two hours, with a break. Please bring food or drink if needed. There is a drink/snack machine nearby. You will be able to schedule your classes during your clinic visit. There are classes offered each week, so if you miss a class, you can reschedule another time to catch up. Support person. (For space reasons, please bring only one support person.) Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care - Hancock Wellness Center

Diabetes Care - Hancock Wellness Center

Find training and treatment to live well with diabetes. Whether you are newly diagnosed or have been dealing with diabetes for a while, Hancock Health offers treatment and education to help you live a healthier, more balanced life. The good news is that diabetes is easier than ever to managewithout the pain and hassles associated with diabetes treatment in decades past. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death. You dont have to be one of these statistics! Hancock Wellness Center is dedicated to helping you find your healthier self with our one-year diabetes prevention program. The first six months will consist of weekly meetings, while the last half of our program will meet on a monthly basis. Facilitated by our team of certified diabetes educators, dietitians, and health coaches, this programs one-year commitment focuses on improving your overall wellness through dietary recommendations, education, and exercise! Class sizes are limited to ensure all participants receive personalized attention and all sessions are held at our Hancock Wellness Center in Greenfield. For more information or to reserve your spot in this life-changing program, contact us by calling (317) 468.4379 or by email at [email protected] . Treatment and education go hand in hand to help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels stable. With the right tools and training, our patients can greatly minimize the long-term risk of complications such as nerve, kidney, and eye damageas well as heart attack and stroke. Our diabetes self-management training (DSMT) helps patients learn about their disease and manage it with lifestyle adjustments: from understanding the disease itself and planning an appropriate diet to exercise, goal setting, and stress management. We also walk p Continue reading >>

Medicare’s National Mail-order Program For Diabetes Testing Supplies

Medicare’s National Mail-order Program For Diabetes Testing Supplies

Medicare has a National Mail-Order Program for diabetes testing supplies (like test strips and lancets). No matter where you live, you'll need to use a Medicare national mail-order contract supplier for Medicare to pay for diabetes testing supplies that are delivered to your home. If you don't want diabetes testing supplies delivered to your home, you can go to any local pharmacy or storefront supplier that's enrolled with Medicare and buy them there. The National Mail-Order Program doesn't require you to change your testing monitor. If you're happy with your current monitor, look for a mail-order contract supplier or local store that can provide the supplies you need for your monitor. If you switch suppliers, you might need to arrange to have your current prescription transferred or get a new prescription for testing supplies from your doctor. Plan ahead before you run out of supplies. How much will I pay if I buy supplies at a store? You'll pay the same amount for diabetes testing supplies whether you buy them at the store or have them delivered to your home. National mail-order contract suppliers can't charge you more than any unmet Part B deductible and 20% coinsurance. Local stores also can't charge more than any unmet Part B deductible and 20% coinsurance if they accept Medicare assignment. Local stores that don't accept assignment may charge you more. If you get your supplies from a local store, check with the store to find out what your payment will be. Find a supplier. The National Mail-Order Program applies to Original Medicare only. If you’re enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan (Part C) (like an HMO or PPO), your plan will let you know if your supplier is changing. If you’re not sure, contact your plan. What if I need a specific brand of equipment or su Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Go to: Abstract The purpose of the present article is to provide a detailed description of the highly successful lifestyle intervention administered to 1,079 participants, which included 45% racial and ethnic minorities and resulted in a 58% reduction in the incidence rate of diabetes (2). The two major goals of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention were a minimum of 7% weight loss/weight maintenance and a minimum of 150 min of physical activity similar in intensity to brisk walking. Both goals were hypothesized to be feasible, safe, and effective based on previous clinical trials in other countries (3–7). The methods used to achieve these lifestyle goals include the following key features: 1) individual case managers or “lifestyle coaches;” 2) frequent contact with participants; 3) a structured, state-of-the-art, 16-session core-curriculum that taught behavioral self-management strategies for weight loss and physical activity; 4) supervised physical activity sessions; 5) a more flexible maintenance intervention, combining group and individual approaches, motivational campaigns, and “restarts;” 6) individualization through a “toolbox” of adherence strategies; 7) tailoring of materials and strategies to address ethnic diversity; and finally 8) an extensive network of training, feedback, and clinical support. Abbreviations: DPP, Diabetes Prevention Program; IGT, impaired glucose tolerance The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 27-center randomized clinical trial to determine whether lifestyle intervention or pharmacological therapy (metformin) would prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who are at high risk for the disease (1). Recently, it was reported that both the lifestyle Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs

Diabetes Programs

Programs Diabetes Management Through Activity Our Diabetes Management through Activity program is designed to help patients transition into an exercise/fitness program to assist with managing their Diabetes. The ultimate goal is to initiate a program that is sustainable and tailored to their needs. We do this through the idea of Diabetes C.A.M.P. The C.A.M.P. acronym refers to these 4 components that are required to successfully control diabetes. C = calories A = activity M = medication/monitoring P = patience In therapy we coordinate with the referring physician as well as diabetic educators to be sure that the patient is aware of all resources and strategies available to assist in managing this disease. Program Overview: Evaluation and treatment of factors limiting activity and exercise ability (i.e. knee pain, back pain, etc) Patient education regarding exercise safety, techniques, parameters, monitoring and other related diabetic management practices Cardiovascular and strength training Balance training Review and transition to self-sustaining exercise/fitness program Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients suffering from peripheral neuropathy commonly experience loss in sensation, pain, and trouble with walking and balance which increases their risk of fall. Clinical research on the Anodyne system, when used with balance and exercise, has demonstrated restored sensation, improved walking and balance and reduced falls. Treatment consists of: Individualized exercise instruction emphasizing extremity strengthening and balance training to address the issues identified in the patient’s initial evaluation. Education on fall prevention, diabetic foot care and home exercise instruction to facilitate independent symptom management through informational handouts and instru Continue reading >>

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