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Diabetes Problems And Solutions

Diabetes: Complications

Diabetes: Complications

People with diabetes are at risk for long-term problems affecting the eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, feet, and nerves. The best way to prevent or delay these problems is to control your blood sugar and take good care of yourself. Eyes It is recommended that people with diabetes see an eye doctor every year for a dilated eye exam. Eye problems that can occur with diabetes include: Cataracts: a clouding of the lens of the eyes. Glaucoma: increased pressure in the eye. Retinopathy: eye changes with the retina in the back of the eye. Symptoms of eye problems include Blurred vision. Spots or lines in your vision. Watery eyes. Eye discomfort. Loss of vision. If you have any changes in your vision, call your healthcare provider. Have your urine checked for protein at least once a year. Protein in the urine is a sign of kidney disease. High blood pressure might also lead to kidney disease. Your blood pressure should be checked when you see your healthcare provider. Symptoms of a kidney problem include: Swelling of the hands, feet, and face. Weight gain from edema. Itching and/or drowsiness. (This can occur with end stage kidney disease.) Prompt treatment may slow the changes with kidney disease. All people with diabetes have an increased chance for heart disease and strokes. Heart disease is the major cause of death in people with diabetes. It is important to control other risks such as high blood pressure and high fats (cholesterol), as well as blood sugar. Symptoms of a heart attack include: Feeling faint. Feeling dizzy. Sweating. Chest pain or pressure. Pain in the shoulders, jaw, and left arm. Warning signs of a stroke include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, usually on one side of the body. Sudden nausea. Vomiting. Difficulty speaking or understanding w Continue reading >>

Disease Control Priorities In Developing Countries. 2nd Edition.

Disease Control Priorities In Developing Countries. 2nd Edition.

Go to: Nature and Distribution of Diabetes Diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both (American Diabetes Association 2004). Classification of Diabetes Diabetes takes three major forms. Type 1 diabetes results from destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas, leading to absolute insulin deficiency. It usually occurs in children and young adults and requires insulin treatment. Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for approximately 85 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases, is usually characterized by insulin resistance in which target tissues do not use insulin properly. A third type of diabetes, gestational diabetes, is first recognized during pregnancy. Other rare types of diabetes include those caused by genetic conditions (for example, maturity-onset diabetes of youths), surgery, drug use, malnutrition, infections, and other illnesses. The Burden of Diabetes Diabetes affects persons of all ages and races. The disease reduces both a person's quality of life and life expectancy and imposes a large economic burden on the health care system and on families. In 2003, the worldwide prevalence of diabetes was estimated at 5.1 percent among people age 20 to 79 (table 30.1). The prevalence of diabetes was higher in developed countries than in developing countries. In the developing world, the prevalence was highest in Europe and Central Asia and lowest in Sub-Saharan Africa. Some of these variations may reflect differences in the age structures and level of urbanization of the various populations. By 2025, the worldwide prevalence is projected to be 6.3 percent, a 24 percent increase compared with 2003. The largest increase in prevalence by 2025 is expected to be in East Asia and the Pacific, a Continue reading >>

State-of-the-art Review Diabetes Care In Malaysia: Problems, New Models, And Solutions

State-of-the-art Review Diabetes Care In Malaysia: Problems, New Models, And Solutions

Abstract Diabetes is a major public health concern in Malaysia, and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has escalated to 20.8% in adults above the age of 30, affecting 2.8 million individuals. The burden of managing diabetes falls on primary and tertiary health care providers operating in various settings. This review focuses on the current status of diabetes in Malaysia, including epidemiology, complications, lifestyle, and pharmacologic treatments, as well as the use of technologies in its management and the adoption of the World Health Organization chronic care model in primary care clinics. A narrative review based on local available health care data, publications, and observations from clinic experience. The prevalence of diabetes varies among the major ethnic groups in Malaysia, with Asian Indians having the highest prevalence of T2D, followed by Malays and Chinese. The increase prevalence of overweight and obesity has accompanied the rise in T2D. Multidisciplinary care is available in tertiary and primary care settings with integration of pharmacotherapy, diet, and lifestyle changes. Poor dietary adherence, high consumption of carbohydrates, and sedentary lifestyle are prevalent in patients with T2D. The latest medication options are available with increasing use of intensive insulin regimens, insulin pumps, and continuous glucose monitoring systems for managing glycemic control. A stepwise approach is proposed to expand the chronic care model into an Innovative Care for Chronic Conditions framework to facilitate implementation and realize better outcomes in primary care settings. A comprehensive strategy and approach has been established by the Malaysian government to improve prevention, treatment, and control of diabetes as an urgent response to this growin Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Its Problems And Solutions

Type 1 Diabetes: Its Problems And Solutions

Type 1 Diabetes: Its Problems and Solutions Formerly known as juvenile-onset diabetes, type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an endocrine disorder characterized by hyperglycemia due to insulin deficiency.1 Most cases of T1D are immune-mediated due to cellular-mediated autoimmune destruction of beta cells, resulting in inadequate insulin secretion and hyperglycemia via abnormal macronutrient metabolism.1,2 Acute hyperglycemia can cause metabolic emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Chronic hyperglycemia can cause vascular complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular disease. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), immune-mediated T1D accounts for 5% to 10% of diabetes cases. Although T1D may occur at any age, 50% to 60% of patients with T1D present at 16 years and younger.3-5 In a population- based cross-sectional study of children and adolescents in 2009, the overall prevalence of newly diagnosed cases of T1D was 1.93 per 1000 patients (95% CI, 1.88-1.97), with whites having the highest incidence of newly diagnosed T1D.6 A patients genome is a significant risk factor for T1D, as a case-control study of approximately 8000 patients with T1D identified 7 genetic variants associated with an increased risk of T1D and celiac disease.7 Other possible risk factors associated with an increased risk of T1D include high birth weight, childhood obesity, and a higher maternal age at birth.8-11 Childhood immunizations, however, are not associated with an increased risk for T1D.12,13 Conditions complicated by T1D include celiac disease and increased risk of hip fracture.14,15 Patients with T1D rarely present asymptomatically; the most common symptoms include polyuria and nocturia, enuresis, lethargy, fatigue, p Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

Problem Solving

Problem Solving

When you have diabetes, you learn to plan ahead to be sure you maintain blood sugar levels within your target range goals – not too high, not too low. That means figuring out when and what you will eat for meals and snacks, when you will monitor blood sugar and how to fit in exercise. But life often throws curve balls, and no matter how well you plan, unexpected things happen that can drive your blood sugar in the wrong direction.When it happens – because it will – you need to know how to problem-solve and think through how to prevent it from happening again. Also, your diabetes needs may change over time, requiring you to make adjustments because previous solutions no longer work. Diabetes educators can help you figure out how to problem solve – in general and for specific issues you may be facing. 1. Don’t beat yourself up – Managing your diabetes doesn’t mean being ”perfect.” 2. Analyze your day – think about what was different: Were you more stressed than usual? Were you traveling? Were you sick? Did something change in your routine (new job, getting up earlier or staying up later)? Were you more or less active than usual? Did you eat more carbohydrates than usual? Did you take more or less diabetes medication than usual? 3. Learn from it – figure out how to correct the problem in a way that works best for you, and apply that to similar situations moving forward:  Carry an extra snack Consider how you can add more activity into your day Think of ways you can ease stress, such as by meditating, doing yoga, or sitting quietly for a few minutes with a cup of tea or a book 4. Discuss possible solutions with  your diabetes educator your doctor your diabetes support group (face to face or on the Internet) 5. Try the new solutions and then evalu Continue reading >>

Natural Diabetes Solutions

Natural Diabetes Solutions

Like so many of my patients, you probably know your cholesterol levels, and you might even recall your last blood pressure reading. But what about your blood sugar levels? Do you know your A1C? Just as importantly, do you know how to maintain healthy levels of blood sugar (also known as glucose)? If not, dont be embarrassed. I blame the medical establishments obsession with cholesterol levels even though those figures are far from the whole story on heart health. But nearly every day, I am reminded of how little attention most people pay to blood sugar numbers until they become insulin resistant (also known aspre-diabetic) or developfull-blown diabetes. Most patients shrug off a diagnosis of elevated blood sugar, in spite of the fact that it is a serious condition that will become diabetes unless you change your ways. For example, its well established that diabetes damages the delicate endothelial cells that line all of our blood vessels. This enables plaque to build up, eventually leading to cardiovascular disease. But that process begins, long before a diabetes diagnosis, with elevated blood sugar. So, even if your cholesterol levels are perfect or close to it, high levels of blood glucose could be harming your heart and blood vessels. As a practicing physician, I see plenty of indications that glucose management is a problem. Excess weight, especially around the waist, is one red flag. But I check all my patients glucose levels because an individual of normal weight can have glucose management problems, too. I look for elevated blood sugar and then check for two or more of these symptoms: Having only three of these markers is enough for a diagnosis of pre-diabetes. These symptoms show that your body is losing its sensitivity to insulin, a hormone produced in the pan Continue reading >>

Solutions For Diabetic Itching Problems

Solutions For Diabetic Itching Problems

People with diabetes are prone to a range of skin issues - in fact, certain problems with the skin can be among the first signs of diabetes. Being constantly itchy is one manifestation of diabetic skin problems, and it can be very uncomfortable. In this article, we'll explore ways to manage itching and the underlying problems that cause it. Why am I itchy? Itchy skin comes from a variety of different causes. You may have a yeast infection, which is a common diabetes complication. If you have a red, itchy rash, you may have a fungal infection called Candida albicans, which generally occurs in areas like the armpits or between your toes. If you do have a fungal infection, your doctor can prescribe you a medication that will treat it, which should also end the itching. Other reasons for itching include dry skin, which is also fairly easy to treat. For itchy dry skin, you should consider taking fewer baths or showers and using very gentle soap when you do. You can also use lotion, of course, which can help moisturize your skin and soothe the itch. In addition to these factors, poor circulation can cause itching over your entire body, particularly on your lower legs. One of the best things you can do to address this itching is to talk to your doctor about why your circulation is poor and what you can do. When is itching serious? One cause of diabetes-related itching that demands your immediate attention is nerve damage. Nerve damage can feel like pain and burning, and also sometimes like itching. You will notice it first in the hands and feet, but it will spread from those parts of the body inward. If you have itching in the hands and feet, talk to your doctor immediately. Your symptoms could reduce if you get your blood sugar under better control, but it's important to take Continue reading >>

Don't Ignore These Diabetes-related Sexual Problems

Don't Ignore These Diabetes-related Sexual Problems

Don't Ignore These Diabetes-Related Sexual Problems Tips to help keep diabetes from interfering with your sex life. Videos: Eating Smart With Martha McKittrick, RD While nightly TV drug commercials seem to imply that sexual dysfunction is a problem only for slim, silver-haired men on vacation, it can plague a larger, and often younger, group of people because of diabetes. Men and women with diabetes can face a variety of challenges in the bedroom, from erectile dysfunction to loss of sensation or lack of desire. Studies have estimated that anywhere from 20 to 75 percent of men with diabetes suffer from impaired sexual function, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and between 18 and 42 percent of women are affected. Why Diabetes Is Linked to Sexual Problems Most sexual problems related to diabetes can be traced back to restricted blood flow and nerve damage. If blood sugars are too high, blood vessels and nerves throughout the body are damaged, says Joshua Safer, MD , an endocrinologist at Boston Medical Center and an associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. If a person has had high blood sugar for years, this damage can injure vital organs, including the eyes, kidneys , and heart. But the places that are going to suffer first are the places farther out our fingers and toes, says Dr. Safer. In men, the penis is also susceptible. Women may experience nerve damage and blood flow problems in the genitals, too, he adds, although the phenomenon is less well studied in women. People with type 2 diabetes may be at additional risk because of such related health issues as unhealthy cholesterol levels, excess abdominal fat, and high blood pressure, which can further damage blood vessels. A diab Continue reading >>

Self Management Solutions

Self Management Solutions

Learn how to keep your sugars within range. This section will help you understand the knowledge, data, analysis, and general principles you need to stay on target. Hitting a target can be a test of skill. It can also be a test of knowledge. People with diabetes aim to keep their blood sugars in a target range, but sometimes they miss. This section will help you understand why that happens and how you can prevent it. Depending on your treatment, self management solutions can vary! These pages will provide you with treatment-specific self-management solutions: Your log entries (that track blood sugar levels, carbohydrate content of meals, medication/insulin doses, exercise, and other events that could affect your blood sugar) View Log book for Type 2 Diabetes treated with intensive insulin. Controlling your diabetes means maintaining the proper balance between insulin dose, food and activity, every day. Put simply, if you are out of balance, your blood sugars will be too. However, if you keep good records you will be able to work with your physician to correct any problems. Look for blood glucose patterns. When are you on target? When are you either too high or too low? After you identify the problem, look for the cause Connect the dots. Do problems with high or low blood sugar crop up at the same time each day? After you eat? After you exercise? When youre relaxed? After you take medication/insulin? When youre stressed? Minimize the variables to narrow down the cause(s) Verify that what youre changing fixes the problem Talk to your diabetes team they can help you analyze your data Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Care: 10 Ways To Avoid Diabetes Complications

Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. Diabetes is a serious disease. Following your diabetes treatment plan takes round-the-clock commitment. But your efforts are worthwhile. Careful diabetes care can reduce your risk of serious — even life-threatening — complications. Here are 10 ways to take an active role in diabetes care and enjoy a healthier future. 1. Make a commitment to managing your diabetes Members of your diabetes care team — doctor or primary care provider, diabetes nurse educator, and dietitian, for example — can help you learn the basics of diabetes care and offer support along the way. But it's up to you to manage your condition. Learn all you can about diabetes. Make healthy eating and physical activity part of your daily routine. Maintain a healthy weight. Monitor your blood sugar level, and follow your doctor's instructions for managing your blood sugar level. Ask your diabetes treatment team for help when you need it. 2. Don't smoke Smoking increases your risk of various diabetes complications, including: Reduced blood flow in the legs and feet, which can lead to infections, ulcers and possible removal of a body part by surgery (amputation) Heart disease Stroke Eye disease, which can lead to blindness Nerve damage Kidney disease Talk to your doctor about ways to help you stop smoking or using other types of tobacco. 3. Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control Like diabetes, high blood pressure can damage your blood vessels. High cholesterol is a concern, too, since the damage is often worse and more rapid when you have diabetes. When these conditions team up, they can lead to a heart attack, stroke or other life-threatening conditions. Eating a healthy, reduced-fat d Continue reading >>

Classroom Problems And Solutions - Diabetes

Classroom Problems And Solutions - Diabetes

What we know: Missed school days are a risk. Several studies suggest that children with diabetes miss about 8 more days of school per year than their healthy classmates. Another recent study suggests a bigger problem by showing that students with diabetes miss almost 10% of scheduled school days. Interestingly, attendance problems may also spillover over to brothers and sisters. Health care experts speculate that siblings sometimes stay home while parents work, acting as frontline disease managers. A few students with type 1 diabetes appear to exaggerate symptoms to avoid class, although little actual research exists to determine the extent of this potential problem. Less research has been conducted regarding students with type 2 diabetes, but it is likely that, as with any chronic illness, regular attendance is diminished. Missed school days may be only part of the missed instruction picture. Students with type 1 diabetes may need to leave class to care for themselves and fulfill their particular disease self-management requirements. A 2006 study found that among students (average age 12 years), 56% had to miss class for routine, non-emergent diabetes care. Although some schools permit in-class blood sugar checks (which can minimize time out of class), others require that students go to the nurse’s office to draw blood or check blood sugar levels. No conclusive research, however, has yet established how much instructional time is routinely missed when students are forced to leave class to manage their disease. Most teachers recognize the crucial importance of regular attendance. More than two decades ago, research confirmed that frequent absences predict problems in reading, spelling, and arithmetic among students with chronic illness. What to do: Several factors hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Problem, Cause, And Solutions

Diabetes: Problem, Cause, And Solutions

Diabetes , Epidemic , Solution , Transplantation We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing well assume youre on board with our cookie policy Diabetes has always been a serious problem in the United States. It is a disease where blood glucose levels are above normal because the body either produces too little insulin or cannot use the insulin that it produces. Untreated, diabetes can lead to serious health consequences including blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart disease, and death. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). There are two types of diabetes, Type 1 diabetes (juvenile onset diabetes) and Type 2 diabetes (adult onset diabetes). Both types of diabetes exhibit similar symptoms or no symptoms at all. These symptoms include excessive thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, extreme hunger, changes in vision, peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, dry skin, and an increase in infections. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Type 1 diabetics may also experience nausea and vomiting. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5 percent to 10 percent of all diagnosed cases and is generally diagnosed in childhood or early adolescence. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). While the causes of Type 1 diabetes are still being explored, it is suspected to follow exposure to an environmental trigger, such as an unidentified virus, stimulating an immune attack against the beta cells of the pancreas (that produce insulin) in some genetically predisposed people. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). While Type 1 diabetes is a serious problem, the current diabetes epidemic focuses on the dramatic increase in the incidence of Type 2 diabetes in American society. Type 2 diabetes used to be referred to as adult-onset di Continue reading >>

Natural Solutions For Diabetes

Natural Solutions For Diabetes

Natural Solutions for Diabetes - Dr. Pompa Home Additional Resources Health Tips Natural Solutions for Diabetes While diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions, the prevailing methods to treat this disease are often ineffective and even harmful. Many doctors will tell you that diabetes is a chronic, progressive disease, and that very little can be done to maintain health over time. But there is hope for people with diabetes, and the solution may be simpler than you think. Dr. Jason Fung recently joined us on Cellular Healing TV to talk about the epidemic of diabetes and a natural approach to fixing it. Dr. Fung earned his medical degree at the University of Toronto where he also completed his internal medicine residency before heading to the University of California, Los Angeles, for his fellowship in nephrology. He currently practices as a kidney specialist in Toronto. During the course of treating thousands of patients, it became clear to Dr. Fung that the epidemic of type 2 diabetes and obesity was getting worse. The prevailing dietary recommendations to reduce dietary fat and calories were clearly ineffective. He founded The Intensive Dietary Management Program to provide a unique treatment focus for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Rather than focusing on medications, this clinic focuses on dietary and lifestyle changes that are simple yet effective. Before we get into Dr. Fungs strategy, lets step back and talk first about what we know about the disease. First of all, its important to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetics are severely lacking insulin, the hormone that allows glucose to be used by the cells for energy. Without insulin, the body cannot store incoming energy from food, so blood glucose levels skyrocket. So, for type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Basics - Problem Solving

Diabetes: The Basics - Problem Solving

Problem Solving Problem solving is an essential skill in diabetes self-management. Your diabetes needs can change from day to day. What works for you most of the time may not work on a particular day. For example, on a day with high stress your blood sugar may be higher than usual or lower than usual. Or, on a day that you are traveling you may cross several time zones and need to change your medication schedule. On a vacation day, you might have a lot more or a lot less physical activity than usual. All of these situations will require some adjustment. To complicate things even further, your diabetes needs can change gradually over time. What used to work for you may no longer work as your life situation changes and your body changes over time. For example, if you change jobs or retire, your schedule may change, and you might need to make changes in your diabetes management. Or, if you develop arthritis in your hands, you may have less ability to handle small strips for your blood glucose meter. And if you have Type 2 diabetes, your pancreas may gradually lose its ability to make insulin, and you may need to make changes in your eating, physical activity, or medications. Most diabetes situations have possible solutions. Good solutions need to fit the individual people who have the problem, and that may require some creativity. Fortunately, effective problem-solving is a skill that can be learned. The most effective learning happens when people work together to solve real problems. This recording will give you a few basic ideas to help you get started. You need flexible, positive thinking When you approach a diabetes problem, the situation usually does not respond to methods you used before. You will need to be willing to try something different, perhaps something brand Continue reading >>

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