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Diabetes Prevention Tips

Diabetes Type 2 Prevention Tips

Diabetes Type 2 Prevention Tips

Please contact [email protected] with any questions. This featured Application Programming Interface (API) page serves as a reference for developers who are building tools that interact with the data on Health Data NY. The page provides examples on how to retrieve data from each of the fields within the dataset. A description of each field is also provided. This specific API page is for the Diabetes Type 2 Prevention Tips dataset. The dataset is a compilation of easy tips to prevent type 2 diabetes. They were compiled from several documents produced by the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP). NDEP is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and more than 200 public and private organizations. B25. This data set is available at: For more information about the dataset, go to the dataset and look in the "About" section. **NOTE*** This API link will take you to a new page that explains Socrataâs new Open Data API (SODA). APIs can now be created directly from any dataset, simply go to the dataset, select 'Export' then select 'SODA API' and click 'API docs'. The new API doc also provides a way to see the old API documentation if needed. To learn more about Socrata's Open Data API visit: Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes Lifestyle Tips

Prevent Diabetes Lifestyle Tips

Making changes may seem tough. But remember, even a small amount of weight loss can usually help prevent type 2 diabetes. While not everyone will be able to fully reverse prediabetes depending on risk factors, most people will be able to lower their risk through physical activity and healthier eating habits. If you can't join a diabetes prevention program right now, there are some things you can do in the meantime to lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. These are the kinds of tips you’ll receive through the program. So read away! Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 6 New Tips

Diabetes Prevention: 6 New Tips

Aug. 25, 2006 -- Tweaking your lifestyle could be a big step towards diabetes prevention. The American Diabetes Association has published new diabetes prevention guidelines for people at high risk of type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. The guidelines appear in September's edition of Diabetes Care. They're accompanied by recommendations for people who already know they have type 2 diabetes. The bottom line: Your daily habits can tilt you towards or away from developing diabetes, and it's never too late to make a positive change. Nearly 21 million people in the U.S. have diabetes. That includes about 6 million people who haven't been diagnosed, according to the CDC. If you're at high risk for diabetes, here's your to-do list from the new guidelines: Lose extra weight. Moderate weight loss -- 7% of your weight -- may cut diabetes risk. Cut fat and calories from your diet. That should help with weight loss. Skip low-carb or high-protein diets. They may not work out in the long run. Get plenty of fiber. Get 14 grams of dietary fiber for every 1,000 calories you eat. Go for whole grains. Make at least half your grains whole grains. Get regular physical activity. Go for 2.5 hours per week (check with your doctor first). The guidelines don't recommend drinking alcohol for diabetes prevention. Observational studies have tied moderate drinking to lower diabetes risk. But there's not enough data to recommend alcohol for diabetes prevention, according to the American Diabetes Association. Have you already been diagnosed with diabetes? There are new guidelines for you, too. The dietary recommendations for people at high risk for diabetes generally apply to diabetes patients. Additional tips for people with diabetes include: Eat healthy carbohydrates. Try fruits, veget Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Tips Sheets

Preventing Diabetes Tips Sheets

NDEP offers diabetes prevention tip sheets for different cultures, ethnicities, and age groups. These tip sheets can help you prevent type 2 diabetes. Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes This tip sheet helps African Americans at risk for type 2 diabetes learn how to get active, reduce portion sizes, and find ways to relax. Prevent Type 2 Diabetes. Step by Step. (Prevengamos la diabetes tipo 2. Paso a paso) This tip sheet helps Hispanics and Latinos at risk for type 2 diabetes get active and eat less to reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes. We Have the Power to Prevent Diabetes Tip Sheet Tips to help American Indians and Alaska Natives at risk for type 2 diabetes. Try these 7 steps to start making healthier choices today. Two Reasons I Find Time to Prevent Diabetes: My Future and Theirs This tip sheet can help Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders at risk for type 2 diabetes. Find out if you are at risk, learn how to lose a small amount of weight, and get tips to increase your activity level. How to Help Your Children Stay Healthy: Tips to Lower Their Chances of Getting Type 2 Diabetes This tip sheet explains what type 2 diabetes is and has information parents can use to help their children prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn what makes some kids more likely to get type 2 diabetes and what you can do. Tips for Teens: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes This tip sheet encourages teens to lower their risk for type 2 diabetes. Learn how to get to a healthy weight and live an active life. Get healthy food and activity guides available in English and Spanish. It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes This tip sheet helps older adults learn how to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes. Start today—make a plan and find out how to get your friends and famil Continue reading >>

Outsmart Diabetes: 10 Tips For Diabetes Prevention

Outsmart Diabetes: 10 Tips For Diabetes Prevention

Millions of Americans are at high risk for diabetes, a serious and costly disease that has reached epidemic proportions. The good news: diabetes can be prevented. What is Diabetes? Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar for our bodies to use as energy. The pancreas makes insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body doesn't make enough insulin or can't use insulin as well as it should. This causes sugars to build up in your blood. "Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and even loss of your feet or legs," says James MacKay, M.D., Providence Health Plan medical director. "Diabetes can be dangerous, but being more active and making appropriate food choices can significantly delay or even prevent diabetes from developing." Anyone can develop diabetes. And for those at high risk – including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders and older adults – prevention is the best medicine. 10 Tips You Can Start Using Now to Prevent Diabetes You don't have to abandon foods you love. Just cut down on portion size and eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you're full. Turn off the television and walk with a friend. When eating out, choose steamed veggies or broiled entrees instead of fried foods and cream sauces. Drink water with your meals. Water will fill you up faster and prevent you from overeating. Read food labels. Choose foods with unsaturated fat, and little or no added sugar or salt. Try getting at least one new fruit or vegetable every time you shop for groceries. Every step counts. Take a 10-minute walking break every day. Walking is great exercise and can help Continue reading >>

Local Doctor Teaches Diabetes Prevention Tips

Local Doctor Teaches Diabetes Prevention Tips

Dr. Shannon Bone stood in front of his audience in the side room of a Jackson restaurant Thursday afternoon and drew a rudimentary picture of a human body cell. Focusing on the basics, Bone didn’t want the session to feel too much like a throwback to high school biology class. But the picture he drew helped him do a little teaching. Bone is a chiropractor who works at the sister practices of Advanced Rehab and Medical and 45 Urgent Care in Jackson. On Thursday, he led one of three sessions this month at the O’Charley’s restaurant in Jackson to let people know how they can prevent diabetes or improve their health now that they have it. Bone’s cell picture on the board helped him explain how blood sugar gets into a cell. Receptors over time can start to resist blood sugar and the pancreas produces more insulin as a balance. Eventually, some people receive insulin injections to maintain the balance artificially. Several people in the room said they take two or three medicines to manage their diabetes, and many of them have lived with it for over a decade. But though Bone explained that a sedentary lifestyle and certain eating habits can accelerate diabetes, he said it’s more complicated than just avoiding obviously unhealthy foods. “The big misconception is your starches,” he said, noting bread and pasta are eventually broken down in your body into sugar just as a cupcake is. Bone said before the meeting that in 1980 there were five million diagnosed diabetics or pre-diabetics in the United States, and in 2012 there were 25 million. “You look at how the prevalence of the disease is getting worse and worse, and it doesn’t look like it’s turning back any time soon,” Bone said. “From a traditional medical approach, we have more medications on the marke Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

While Type 1 diabetes is not preventable, Type 2 diabetes can be with weight loss and moderate physical activity. The following links have important information about diabetes and prevention. Bogus diabetes products are flooding the marketplace, especially the internet. Be cautious when you see bold product claims which make unrealistic promises. Watch this video to learn more. “An estimated 86 million Americans over age 20 have prediabetes. 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years and they are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke. The risk of death for adults with diabetes is 59% higher than for adults without diabetes. (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Preventing Diabetes Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality - Diabetes Prevention National Institutes of Health - Cardiac Bypass Surgery Prediabetes The CDC is a great resource for prediabetes, and general diabetes prevention. Look at the following links for tips on prediabetes, facts, and other helpful information. Food Labeling Food can make a big difference with diabetes management. The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. Learn more about healthier food options, labeling, and nutrition below. Healthy Lifestyle and Healthy People 2020 Lifestyle is important in diabetes management. This box includes information about being active and healthy, as well as several initiatives and campaigns from across the government. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Healthy People 2020 initiative, aims to i Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Currently there is no way to prevent , but ongoing studies are exploring ways to prevent diabetes in those who are most likely to get it. People who have a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes and are willing to participate in one of these studies should talk with their doctors. People who have type 1 diabetes can help prevent or delay the development of complications by keeping their blood sugar in a target range. They also need regular medical checkups to detect early signs of complications. If complications are treated early, the damage may be stopped, slowed, or possibly reversed. People who have other health problems along with diabetes, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol, need to treat those conditions. Also, not smoking can reduce the risk of complications. Having other health problems can increase the risk for complications from diabetes. Get a flu vaccine every year. When you have the flu, it can be harder to manage your blood sugar. It's a good idea to get a pneumococcal vaccine for pneumonia and a vaccine for hepatitis B. You may need or want additional immunizations if certain situations raise your chance for exposure to disease. Continue reading >>

8 Simple Diabetes Prevention Tips For Families

8 Simple Diabetes Prevention Tips For Families

Looking for a diabetes prevention action plan? You don't have to change your life a lot, just a little, to make a big difference for you and your family. More than 30 million Americans live with the disease, according to the latest statistics. It’s on the rise, even among children. But you absolutely can prevent or at least delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, which accounts for the vast majority of cases, said Sandra Arévalo, a spokeswoman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators and coordinator of the diabetes management programs at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. “All of these tips need to be like a commercial — you hear it and you hear it and you hear it until it sticks with you, like a jingle, so that people start knowing and especially doing what they need to do,” Arévalo told TODAY. You may want to start by taking a risk test offered by the American Diabetes Association. Then keep these eight tips in mind: 1. Lose a bit of weight If you’re overweight or obese, lose at least 10 percent of your weight — studies show that can delay the onset of diabetes and help you live longer, Arévalo said. If you weigh 180 pounds, for example, make it your goal to shed 18 pounds. “It is doable,” she noted. “You can do it by yourself, or with the help of a diabetes educator, a dietician or with your doctor.” One place to get help is the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, with more than 200 locations across the country offering guidance in a small-group setting on how to eat healthier, move more and lose weight. 2. Cut down on all sweetened foods and beverages That’s the No. 1 rule if you want to prevent diabetes, Arévalo said: “Diabetes is extra sugar in your blood, so obviously the more sugar you eat from foods and drinks, the more sug Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look for the word "whole" on the package and among the first few items in the ingredient list. 4. Lose extra weight If you're overweigh Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

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