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Diabetes Prevention Tips

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Tips

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Tips

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in America. According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 20 million Americans had type 2 diabetes in 2012. Unfortunately, the numbers seem to be on the rise. However, unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes isn’t necessarily a lifelong condition. In some cases, you can control type 2 diabetes with diet, exercise, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Taking Care of Yourself—And Your Diabetes Whether taking care of families, jobs, or various other things, it’s easy to put your health on the back-burner. But ignoring your health and not taking care of yourself is never okay. Living a healthy lifestyle and being invested in your long-term health is a good preventative measure for many disease, including type 2 diabetes. Below are some preventative tips for curbing the onset of type 2 diabetes: Stay at A Healthy Weight Not only does being overweight put you at risk for type 2 diabetes, but you’re also putting yourself at risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. The American Diabetes Association points out that the weight loss doesn’t have to be significant to see significant results—even losing 10-15 pounds can make a big difference. Eat Your Way to a Healthy Lifestyle Studies show that eating foods with a low glycemic-index, as well as foods rich in fiber and other important nutrients, may help lower the risk for type 2 diabetes. The ADA also recommends that 30 percent of a person’s daily energy supply should come from fat. Get Active The American Diabetes Association recommends aerobic exercise for 30-minutes a day, five days a week for a total of 150 minutes of aerobic exercise per week. The ADA also recommends to spread it out throughout the week and to not go more th Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes is a medical condition that affects the body’s ability to produce or use insulin. It also affects blood sugar levels. The three types of diabetes are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects the body’s ability to produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes affects the body’s ability to use insulin well. Gestational diabetes impacts the body’s ability to use blood sugar during pregnancy. The cause of type 1 diabetes is not understood and at this time is not preventable. However, people trying to avoid type 2 diabetes may be able to engage in lifestyle changes that lower their risk. Obesity is a major risk factor in type 2 diabetes. According to the National Diabetes Education Program, overweight people who lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight can help prevent diabetes. The first step in weight loss or weight maintenance to prevent diabetes is eating a healthy diet. This includes avoiding foods that are high in unhealthy fats and cholesterol in favor of fresh foods and whole-grain carbohydrate choices. Avoiding processed and pre-packaged foods can help. Portion control is often an important aspect of eating a healthy diet. For example, a serving of meat or fish should be roughly the size of a deck of cards. However, most Americans eat significantly larger food amounts. By limiting excessive portions, people can cut calories to result in weight loss. Exercise is the second part of the weight-loss plan for people trying to prevent type 2 diabetes. Engaging in at least 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week can help. However, people who don’t currently exercise may need to start in smaller intervals. This can include three 10-minute exercise sessions each day. Exercise doesn’t have to be strenuous to be effective. Moderate, low Continue reading >>

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Choose More Than 50 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Reduce Portion Sizes Portion size is the amount of food you eat, such as 1 cup of fruit or 6 ounces of meat. If you are trying to eat smaller portions, eat a half of a bagel instead of a whole bagel or have a 3-ounce hamburger instead of a 6-ounce hamburger. Three ounces is about the size of your fist or a deck of cards. Put less on your plate, Nate. 1. Drink a large glass of water 10 minutes before your meal so you feel less hungry. 2. Keep meat, chicken, turkey, and fish portions to about 3 ounces. 3. Share one dessert. Eat a small meal, Lucille. 4. Use teaspoons, salad forks, or child-size forks, spoons, and knives to help you take smaller bites and eat less. 5. Make less food look like more by serving your meal on a salad or breakfast plate. 6. Eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you are full. 7. Listen to music while you eat instead of watching TV (people tend to eat more while watching TV). How much should I eat? Try filling your plate like this: 1/4 protein 1/4 grains 1/2 vegetables and fruit dairy (low-fat or skim milk) Move More Each Day Find ways to be more active each day. Try to be active for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. Walking is a great way to get started and you can do it almost anywhere at any time. Bike riding, swimming, and dancing are also good ways to move more. If you are looking for a safe place to be active, contact your local parks department or health department to ask about walking maps, community centers, and nearby parks. Dance it away, Faye. 8. Show your kids the dances you used to do when you were their age. 9. Turn up the music and jam while doing household chores. 10. Work out with a video that shows you how to get active. Let's go, Flo. 11. Deliver a message in person to a co-worke Continue reading >>

Outsmart Diabetes: 10 Tips For Diabetes Prevention

Outsmart Diabetes: 10 Tips For Diabetes Prevention

Millions of Americans are at high risk for diabetes, a serious and costly disease that has reached epidemic proportions. The good news: diabetes can be prevented. What is Diabetes? Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar for our bodies to use as energy. The pancreas makes insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body doesn't make enough insulin or can't use insulin as well as it should. This causes sugars to build up in your blood. "Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and even loss of your feet or legs," says James MacKay, M.D., Providence Health Plan medical director. "Diabetes can be dangerous, but being more active and making appropriate food choices can significantly delay or even prevent diabetes from developing." Anyone can develop diabetes. And for those at high risk – including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders and older adults – prevention is the best medicine. 10 Tips You Can Start Using Now to Prevent Diabetes You don't have to abandon foods you love. Just cut down on portion size and eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for your stomach to send a signal to your brain that you're full. Turn off the television and walk with a friend. When eating out, choose steamed veggies or broiled entrees instead of fried foods and cream sauces. Drink water with your meals. Water will fill you up faster and prevent you from overeating. Read food labels. Choose foods with unsaturated fat, and little or no added sugar or salt. Try getting at least one new fruit or vegetable every time you shop for groceries. Every step counts. Take a 10-minute walking break every day. Walking is great exercise and can help Continue reading >>

Prediabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Prediabetes And Diabetes Prevention

It is estimated that one in three American adults have prediabetes, or 84 million adults. Within the Intermountain Medical Group, 17,000 patients meet criteria for prediabetes, and another 80,000 have risk factors for the disease. What is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a condition in which individuals have high blood glucose levels but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. People with prediabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, but not everyone with prediabetes will progress to diabetes. Lifestyle changes resulting in weight loss and increased physical activity can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and in some cases return blood glucose levels to within the normal range. While prediabetes can progress to type 2 diabetes, there are three forms of diabetes that you should be aware of: Type 1 diabetes is when your body does not produce insulin. This type of diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes is when your body does not use insulin properly. This form of diabetes is the most common form of the disease. Gestational diabetes occurs when your body is not able to make and use all the insulin it needs for pregnancy. Many women develop gestational diabetes around the 24th week of pregnancy. Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

6 Tips For Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to Type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is crucial, especially if you're at increased risk. If you’re overweight, have a family history of diabetes or are African-American, then you have a greater chance of having diabetes. Making a few basic lifestyle changes now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes later, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Preventing Type 2 diabetes can be as simple as eating more healthfully, being more physically active and shedding a few extra pounds – and there’s no such thing as being too late to begin. Making a few basic lifestyle changes now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes later, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association and your Kelsey-Seybold doctors include: Get more exercise! Exercise can help you lose weight, lower your blood sugar and boost your sensitivity to insulin – which helps maintain your blood sugar within a normal range. A fitness program that incorporates both aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. Eat fiber-rich foods! These include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Doing so may help you reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control, lower your risk of heart disease and promote weight loss by helping you feel full. Reach for whole grains! Set a goal of making at least half your dietary grains whole grains. Whole grains in breads, pasta products and cereals may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Check for the word "whole" on the package and in the first few listed ingredients on the label. Drop the excess weight! Every pound you lose can improve your health. Continue reading >>

What You May Not Know About Diabetes: Diabetes Prevention Tips

What You May Not Know About Diabetes: Diabetes Prevention Tips

For anyone at risk of Type 2 diabetes, prevention can be paramount. According to the CDC, an estimated 29 million Americans are diabetic, and an additional 86 million suffer from pre-diabetes. Left untreated, many of those pre-diabetics will go on to develop the full form of the disease and be placed at risk for its serious complications. These complications include kidney damage, blindness, hearing impairment, amputation, stroke, and heart disease. Diabetes prevention for seniors is particularly important because as many as half of all seniors over the age of 65 suffer from pre-diabetes. But there is some good news. With the right lifestyle modifications, it’s possible to reduce your risk of diabetes by as much as 60%. These simple lifestyle changes have proven to be roughly twice as effective as anti-diabetes drugs. Below we’ll look at several of these simple lifestyle modifications that have been proven to be some of the most effective techniques for elderly diabetes prevention in our diabetes prevention tips. Diet and Exercise The leading risk factor for diabetes is obesity. Being even marginally overweight can significantly increase your risk of contracting diabetes. One study has estimated that for every 2.2 pounds of lost weight, it’s possible to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes about 16%. When a senior is trying to lose weight, it’s important to begin by setting realistic goals within a comfortable time frame, and then take small steps towards achieving those objectives. Please discuss with your doctor, or a nutritional expert, an appropriate diet for you. In most cases, the best way for a senior to lose weight is by adopting a low-calorie diet. Such a diet should prominently include a variety of fruits and fiber-rich vegetables, which research has sh Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention Tips

Managing Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention Tips

Managing Diabetes and Diabetes Prevention Tips Five lifestyle tips for managing diabetes Can type 1 diabetes be prevented? How can diabetes type 2 be prevented? Learn more about combating diabetes with these diabetes management and diabetes prevention tips. Diabetes management involves day-to-day treatment as well as bigger-picture lifestyle choices. Commit to a healthier life with these lifestyle tips to help manage, delay or even prevent your diabetes. 1.Understand your diabetes. Diabetes is a group of diseases that result when the pancreas has difficulty producing or using insulin, a hormone which extracts glucose (sugar) from the foods you eat and turns it into energy. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes: What is the cause of type type 1 diabetes? Can type 1 diabetes be prevented? Although the exact factors and cause of type 1 diabetes are unknown, there are a few things that we do know. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body's immune system attacks itself by destroying insulin-producing cells released by the pancreas. Those with type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily, since their bodies do not product insulin on their own. Type 1 us usually diagnosed in childhood. Type 2 Diabetes: Type 2 diabetes is the most common, and occurs when the body does not produce or use insulin effectively, called insulin resistance. How can diabetes type 2 be prevented? Research shows the losing weight and regular exercise can delay or even prevent the type 2 diabetes from occurring. Most people with Type 2 diabetes must take insulin or pills to control their diabetes. The onset of type 2 and recognition of symptoms is usually a gradual process. Gestational diabetes is another type of diabetes that some women develop during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes typically disa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Tips.

Diabetes Prevention Tips.

It is always a bit difficult spelling out the exact prevention tips for a disease that still has almost unknown causes. However, considering the risk factors we mentioned in the earlier pages, there may be things you can do to reduce your chances of getting diabetes. These suggestions may also prolong or postpone the onset of getting it. Regular exercise or physical activity Exercise helps the body’s circulation and keeps the body from developing excess fat. It helps check weight gain and reduces the chances of getting diabetes. Teens and young people should avoid sitting at one place for longer periods of the day. Things like excessively watching TV, playing computer and screen games and sleeping all the time should be avoided if possible. Exercise also helps insulin work better to control the level of glucose in the blood. A study by George Washington University found out that A 15-minute walk after each meal could prevent older people developing type-2 diabetes. Elevated blood sugar after meals could increase the risk of type-2 diabetes, so resting after eating "is the worst thing you can do", the study said. — BBC/health-22853314 Eat healthy Whole grains, citrus fruits (grape fruit, oranges and lemons), Dark Green Leafy Vegetables, Berries (rich in antioxidants), tomatoes, beans and lean meats are always a better option than fatty foods like cheeses, cakes, ice-creams, lard and butter, chocolate, coconut oil and poultry skin. Avocado has one of the healthiest fats, and known to help improve insulin sensitivity and heart health. Eating healthy can help you cut extra fat and keep you in good weight. It also helps the cells to grown better and improves the general well being of the body. Here is a tip on what to eat. Reduce intake of sugar Diabetes is all about exc Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

When to see your doctor When to see your doctor If you're older than age 45 and your weight is normal, ask your doctor if diabetes testing is appropriate for you. The American Diabetes Association recommends blood glucose screening if: You're age 45 or older and overweight You're younger than age 45 and overweight, with one or more additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes — such as a sedentary lifestyle or a family history of diabetes Share your concerns about diabetes prevention with your doctor. He or she will applaud your efforts to keep diabetes at bay, and perhaps offer additional suggestions based on your medical history or other factors. Continue reading >>

Tips For Recruiting Employees For Worksite Diabetes Prevention Programs

Tips For Recruiting Employees For Worksite Diabetes Prevention Programs

Offering a diabetes prevention program is both relevant and appropriate in many community settings, including the workplace. However, information on recruitment strategies in the worksite is limited. By M. Kaye Kramer, DrPH, MPH, RN Our team from the Diabetes Prevention Support Center (DPSC) at the University of Pittsburgh looked at this important issue. The results were recently published in Contemporary Clinical Trials, titled “Recruitment for a Diabetes Prevention Program translation effort in a workplace setting.” For this project, the DPSC collaborated with key management at a large international worksite in the Pittsburgh area in order to develop and implement a plan to recruit at-risk employees to take part in the Group Lifestyle Balance™ (GLB) program, a direct adaptation of the successful lifestyle intervention utilized in a large NIH-funded clinical research study, the Diabetes Prevention Program. The recruitment plan focused on: In-person onsite activities Implementation of a variety of simple media recruitment tools and methods. Included in our effort were adult, overweight/obese employees and family members with pre-diabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome. Telephone pre-screening was completed for 176 individuals resulting in 171 eligible for onsite screening. Of that number, 160 completed onsite screening, 107 met eligibility criteria, and 89 enrolled in the study. Developing an Employee Recruitment Plan for Diabetes Prevention in the Worksite For those of you who are planning to deliver a diabetes prevention program in the worksite, the DPSC offers the following simple and inexpensive ways to create program awareness and recruit at-risk employees: In-person onsite recruitment activities: Host a company-wide announcement of the program in a town hall Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes Lifestyle Tips

Prevent Diabetes Lifestyle Tips

Making changes may seem tough. But remember, even a small amount of weight loss can usually help prevent type 2 diabetes. While not everyone will be able to fully reverse prediabetes depending on risk factors, most people will be able to lower their risk through physical activity and healthier eating habits. If you can't join a diabetes prevention program right now, there are some things you can do in the meantime to lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. These are the kinds of tips you’ll receive through the program. So read away! Continue reading >>

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