diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Prevention Program Objectives

Community-based Diabetes Prevention And Management Education In Rural India

Community-based Diabetes Prevention And Management Education In Rural India

Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Education in Rural India Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Education in Rural India Padmini Balagopal PHD CDE RD and N Kamalamma PHD, Thakor G Patel MD, Chair Public Health Committee, AAPI & Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Ranjita Misra PHD, CHES, Member Public Health Committee, AAPI & Professor, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas The World Health Organization predicts non communicable diseases (NCDs) will account for two-thirds of all deaths within the next 25 years in the South-East Asian countries.India is the diabetic capital of the world with 58 million individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Seventy percent of Indias population lives in resource-poor rural settings where a chronic disease like type 2 diabetes mellitus can rapidly deteriorate into a crisis due to low awareness, poor access to quality care, and increased diabetes-related complications. Primary prevention is therefore critically important because it offers the most cost-effective strategy to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus and sustain the changes long-term. Studies suggest a community based participatory approach (CBPR) will enhance the effectiveness of such diabetes programs by engaging the participants in the planning and intervention processes. Hence, this project used a 7-month non-pharmacological intervention was to evaluate the effectiveness of a CBPR based diabetes prevention and management program in rural Tamil Nadu in India. This project evaluated a 7-month community-based non-pharmacological lifestyle modification intervention to prevent/reduce the risk of developing diabetes and its complications in the resource-poor village in Tamilnadu, India. T Continue reading >>

Stage Model For Assessing A Community-based Diabetes Prevention Program In Sweden | Health Promotion International | Oxford Academic

Stage Model For Assessing A Community-based Diabetes Prevention Program In Sweden | Health Promotion International | Oxford Academic

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes, with a prevalence of at least 4% in Sweden. Aiming at primary prevention of the disease, the Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP) was developed as a joint program between the Departments of Endocrinology, Social Medicine and Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institute. The program was designed to include three stages, i.e. a combined baseline and aetiological study, a community-based intervention program and a follow-up study after 10 years. In 1995, the intervention program was initiated in Stockholm County with the aim of reducing the incidence of type 2 diabetes. The intervention has focused on the whole adult population in three intervention municipalities, where the local authorities have been involved in planning, initiating and implementing the program. Activities to prevent diabetes, aiming at risk factors such as obesity, low physical activity, dietary habits and tobacco use, have been initiated together with people from different fields and backgrounds, and with different ideas and approaches to health promotion and diabetes prevention. This paper provides a description and reflects upon the development and implementation process of SDPP as well as its interaction with the intervention communities. The stage model that was used for planning SDPP will be used for describing the various phases of the program. Over the period of the program, interest and responsibility has grown at the municipal authorities. The program has been a concern for the municipalities, as the program intermediate goals are also important for other health promotion issues. process evaluation , stage model , Stockholm Diabetes Prevention Program , type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disease with increasing prevalence, and high ec Continue reading >>

Strategic Priorities And Objectives-diabetes

Strategic Priorities And Objectives-diabetes

Strategic Priorities and Objectives-Diabetes The Georgia DPCP seeks to utilize diabetes surveillance data, coupled with multi-sector partnerships and collaborative efforts to advance policies and support the adoption of evidence-based guidelines in an effort to sustain quality-oriented healthcare services as well as expand access to evidence-based Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) Programs and Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPP) statewide. Cornerstone of the Georgia Diabetes Prevention and Control Program: Access to Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Preventive Care Resources Diabetes Data Surveillance and Evaluation Health Communication: Diabetes Prevention and Diabetes Management The Georgia DPCP is part of a national effort by the CDC Division of Diabetes Translation and is focused on the following statewide efforts to improve the health of Georgians. Access Related to Primary and Secondary Prevention To reduce the onset and severity of diabetes-related complications among Georgians statewide (including medically underserved regions) by collaborating with organizations to expand access to nationally recognized and evidence-based Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) Programs including: American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Accredited DSME Programs American Diabetes Association (ADA) Recognized Diabetes Education Programs To reduce risks among Georgia adults at "high risk" for developing Diabetes including adults diagnosed with Prediabetes (also known as Borderline Diabetes) by collaborating with organizations to increase the availability of evidence-based Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPP) in various settings. To reduce the onset and severity of diabetes-related complications among vulnerable population groups including: women with Continue reading >>

About The Program

About The Program

In the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program a trained lifestyle coach facilitates a small group of adults to discuss behavior changes that can improve the health of participants. The program consists of 25 one-hour sessions delivered over the course of a year. Program Goals Lose 5–7% of your body weight Gradually increase your physical activity to 150 minutes per week. Participants do this through: Healthy Eating – Eating smaller portions, reducing fat in your diet and discovering healthier foods can help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Increasing Physical Activity – Moderate physical activity (walking, swimming, mowing the lawn) for as little as 30 minutes, five days a week, can help improve your blood pressure, raise your good cholesterol and prevent blood flow problems. Losing Weight – Reducing your body weight by as little as 5–7% can offer tremendous benefits for people at risk for diabetes. Research has shown that YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program can reduce the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes by as much as 58% and by 71% among adults aged 60 years or older. THE Y CAN HELP If you are at risk for developing diabetes, YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can help. Find out if a Y near you runs the program. Continue reading >>

Program Details | Naccho

Program Details | Naccho

Power to Prevent Diabetes Prevention Program Frederick County Health Department/Nursing Division Power to Prevent Diabetes Prevention Program Our Power to Prevent program addresses the public health issue of diabetes. In Maryland, in 2008, an estimated 373,346 (8.7%) adults were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. The curriculum we use also indirectly addresses obesity by encouraging healthy eating habits and increased physical activity. Diabetes and obesity are major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Evidence from several studies indicates that obesity and weight gain are associated with an increased risk of diabetes. Each year an estimated 300,000 US adults die of causes related to obesity. Over half (68%) of US adults with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke. Obesity also substantially increases morbidity and impairs quality of life. Overall, the direct costs of obesity and physical inactivity account for approximately 9.4 percent of US health care expenditures. The total estimated cost of diabetes (direct and indirect) in the U.S. in 2007 was $174 billion. The Health Department is the lead agency in the implementation of the Power to Prevent program and provides in kind group meeting space. Staff within the division are educated about the program and refer clients from other Community Health division programs to Power to Prevent. The Power to Prevent Coordinator also attends staff meetings of other divisions within the Health Department to provide information about the program and encourage referrals. The Hillcrest School-Based Health Center, which is a program of the Health Department, identifies and refers parents who may be at high risk for type 2 diabetes. The community, in which the School-Based Health Center is located, is predominantly Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Go to: Abstract The purpose of the present article is to provide a detailed description of the highly successful lifestyle intervention administered to 1,079 participants, which included 45% racial and ethnic minorities and resulted in a 58% reduction in the incidence rate of diabetes (2). The two major goals of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention were a minimum of 7% weight loss/weight maintenance and a minimum of 150 min of physical activity similar in intensity to brisk walking. Both goals were hypothesized to be feasible, safe, and effective based on previous clinical trials in other countries (3–7). The methods used to achieve these lifestyle goals include the following key features: 1) individual case managers or “lifestyle coaches;” 2) frequent contact with participants; 3) a structured, state-of-the-art, 16-session core-curriculum that taught behavioral self-management strategies for weight loss and physical activity; 4) supervised physical activity sessions; 5) a more flexible maintenance intervention, combining group and individual approaches, motivational campaigns, and “restarts;” 6) individualization through a “toolbox” of adherence strategies; 7) tailoring of materials and strategies to address ethnic diversity; and finally 8) an extensive network of training, feedback, and clinical support. Abbreviations: DPP, Diabetes Prevention Program; IGT, impaired glucose tolerance The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 27-center randomized clinical trial to determine whether lifestyle intervention or pharmacological therapy (metformin) would prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who are at high risk for the disease (1). Recently, it was reported that both the lifestyle Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention In The “real World”

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention In The “real World”

Abstract OBJECTIVE—“Real-world” implementation of lifestyle interventions is a challenge. The Good Ageing in Lahti Region (GOAL) Lifestyle Implementation Trial was designed for the primary health care setting, with lifestyle and risk reduction objectives derived from the major diabetes prevention efficacy trials. We report on the program's effectiveness as well as findings related to the program's reach, adoption, and implementation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 352 middle-aged participants with elevated type 2 diabetes risk were recruited from the health care centers in Päijät-Häme Province in Finland. The intervention included six group counseling sessions, delivered by trained public health nurses. Measurement was conducted at baseline and 12 months. Clinical risk factors were measured by study nurses, and lifestyle outcomes were analyzed from self-reports. Lifestyle outcomes were compared with the outcomes achieved in relevant efficacy trials, and within-subject changes were tested for risk reduction. RESULTS—At baseline, mean BMI was >32 kg/m2, and 25% of the participants had impaired glucose tolerance. At 12 months, 20% of participants achieved at least four of five key lifestyle outcomes, with these results being comparable with the reference trials. However, physical activity and weight loss goals were achieved significantly less frequently (65 vs. 86% and 12 vs. 43%, respectively). Several clinical risk factors decreased, more so among men than women. CONCLUSIONS—This trial demonstrates that lifestyle counseling can be effective and is feasible in real-world settings for individuals with elevated risk of type 2 diabetes. To increase program impact, program exposure and treatment intensity need to be increased. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHOD Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The purpose of the present article is to provide a detailed description of the highly successful lifestyle intervention administered to 1,079 participants, which included 45% racial and ethnic minorities and resulted in a 58% reduction in the incidence rate of diabetes[ 2 ]. The two major goals of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention were a minimum of 7% weight loss/weight maintenance and a minimum of 150 min of physical activity similar in intensity to brisk walking. Both goals were hypothesized to be feasible, safe, and effective based on previous clinical trials in other countries[ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ]. The methods used to achieve these lifestyle goals include the following key features: 1) individual case managers or "lifestyle coaches;" 2) frequent contact with participants; 3) a structured, state-of-the-art, 16-session core-curriculum that taught behavioral self-management strategies for weight loss and physical activity; 4) supervised physical activity sessions; 5) a more flexible maintenance intervention, combining group and individual approaches, motivational campaigns, and "restarts;" 6) individualization through a "toolbox" of adherence strategies; 7) tailoring of materials and strategies to address ethnic diversity; and finally 8) an extensive network of training, feedback, and clinical support. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 27-center randomized clinical trial to determine whether lifestyle intervention or pharmacological therapy (metformin) would prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who are at high risk for the disease[ 1 ]. Recently, it was reported that both the lifestyle intervention and metformin were effective in decreasing the incidence of diabetes. Lifestyle Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Control Program | Department Of Health Website

Diabetes Prevention And Control Program | Department Of Health Website

Diabetes is a global concern that cuts across geographical boundaries regardless of race, sex, status and age. Diabetes and its complications impose a heavy burden to the individual, his family and society in general. Some of its serious effects are disability, poor quality of life and premature death. These impact not only on health care cost but more significantly on national growth and development. To reduce morbidity, mortality and disability rates due to chronic lifestyle related non-communicable diseases through an integrated and comprehensive program on the prevention and control of lifestyle related diseases. 1. To develop and promote an integrated and comprehensive program on the prevention and control of lifestyle related diseases in the country. 2. To engage all province-wide or city-wide health systems to adopt an integrated and comprehensive program on the prevention and control of lifestyle related diseases. 3. To achieve improvement in the following key performance indicators from 2011-2016. INTERVENTIONS / STRATEGIES IMPLEMENTED BY DOH The action framework has seven (7) action areas as follows: (1) Environmental Interventions (2) Lifestyle interventions (3) Clinical interventions (4) Advocacy (5) Research, surveillance, monitoring and evaluation (6) Networking and coalition building (7) Health system strengthening Continue reading >>

Evaluation Considerations

Evaluation Considerations

Organizations seeking to implement evaluations should identify evaluation strategies during the program planning phase. Developing an evaluation plan can help to clarify and guide the implementation of an evaluation approach. Important considerations include research questions, evaluation measures, evaluation design, and data collection strategies. Other considerations in developing health promotion and disease prevention evaluations include: Engaging stakeholders in evaluation planning: Stakeholders can help with evaluation by supporting data collection efforts. Stakeholders can ensure credible information is collected that logically corresponds with program expectations, reflects the practices and realities of the people served by the program, and can be organized to showcase the lessons learned. Defining evaluation goals and objectives: Evaluations can provide insight into program processes, effectiveness, outcomes, and impact. By defining evaluation goals and objectives, organizations can identify how program elements interact, practices to maximize program effectiveness, the value of those effects, and how the program influences its participants. Connecting program goals and objectives to outcome indicators: Organizations should define the goals and objectives of their health promotion/disease prevention program and connect these goals to measureable indicators and outcomes. Objectives should include the source of change (i.e., program activities), those affected by the change (target population), the extent of the change (what is changed and by how much), and when to expect change (short-term and long term outcomes). Selecting an evaluation design: Organizations should select an evaluation strategy that allows them to gather information important to stakeholders. Continue reading >>

Culturally-grounded Diabetes Prevention Program For Obese Latino Youth: Rationale, Design, And Methods

Culturally-grounded Diabetes Prevention Program For Obese Latino Youth: Rationale, Design, And Methods

N2 - Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) disproportionately impacts Latino youth yet few diabetes prevention programs address this important source of health disparities. Objectives To address this knowledge gap, we describe the rationale, design, and methodology underpinning a culturally-grounded T2D prevention program for obese Latino youth. The study aims to: 1) to test the efficacy of the intervention for reducing T2D risk, 2) explore potential mediators and moderators of changes in health behaviors and health outcomes and, 3) examine the incremental cost-effectiveness for reducing T2D risk. Latino adolescents (N=160, age 1416) will be randomized to either a 3-month intensive lifestyle intervention or a control condition. The intervention consists of weekly health education delivered by bilingual/bicultural promotores and 3 moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) sessions/week. Control youth receive health information and results from their laboratory testing. Insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and weight-specific quality of life are assessed at baseline, 3-months, 6-months, and 12-months. We will explore whether enhanced self-efficacy and/or social support mediate improvements in nutrition/PA behaviors and T2D outcomes. We will also explore whether effects are moderated by sex and/or acculturation. Cost-effectiveness from the health system perspective will be estimated by the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio using changes in insulin sensitivity at 12-months. Conclusions The results of this study will provide much needed information on how T2D prevention interventions for obese Latino youth are developed, implemented and evaluated. This innovative approach is an essential step in the development of scalable, cost-effective, solution oriented programs to p Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy Alliance - Support For Healthy People 2020

Diabetes Advocacy Alliance - Support For Healthy People 2020

Letters & Comments Healthy People 2020 Past Activities DAA Activities Screening DSMES Medicare DPP The Diabetes Advocacy Alliance (DAA) and the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP), have a 10-year strategic partnership, which was announced on November 19, 2012. This partnership works to help advance Healthy People 2020 diabetes objectives related to prevention and treatment through: Coordination of activities that promote awareness of diabetes prevention or prevention of complications from diabetes; Facilitation of data collection to monitor progress toward achievement of Healthy People 2020 diabetes objectives; and Support for cross-sector collaboration to affect policy and system changes. The Healthy People 2020 program provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. For three decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time in order to: Encourage collaborations across communities and sectors; Empower individuals toward making informed health decisions; and Measure the impact of prevention activities. Examples of DAA Collaboration with Healthy People 2020 On February 21st, 2017 the DAA co-hosted a webinar with the HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). The webinar, Improving Diabetes Screening and Referral to Prevention Programs: A Healthy People 2020 Spotlight on Health Webinar, featured leading subject matter experts and evidence-based programs and resources. The goal of the webinar was to educate interested stakeholders on the importance of screening, for both prediabetes and diabetes, and referral to diabetes prevention program. Webinar presenters included: Dr. Ed Gregg, Centers Continue reading >>

My Aade Network : Building Your Diabetes Prevention Program - December 15, 2017; Tampa, Fl : Learning Objectives & Outcomes

My Aade Network : Building Your Diabetes Prevention Program - December 15, 2017; Tampa, Fl : Learning Objectives & Outcomes

Details Agenda Location and Hotel Information CE Information Learning Objectives & Outcomes Faculty Cancellation Policy Registration This activity is designed for both healthcare professionals and non-healthcare professionals who are looking to implement the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Participants who complete this workshop will have a better understanding of the National DPP Landscape, CDC recognition Standards and the reimbursement landscape including the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) benefit. With this increased knowledge, you will be able to implement the NationalDiabetes Prevention Program within or outside of your diabetes self-management education and support program. At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to: Explain the evidence base for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) List the Lifestyle Change Program participant eligibility, goals, curriculum delivery, and required documentation and data collection Review and explain CDCs DPRP standards and how programs can ensure success Explain AADE's role in the National DPP and opportunities for DSMES programs and diabetes educators to house their own DPP program Develop a business plan to implement a prevention program into an already existing DSMES Program Considerations in the sustainability of a prevention program Discuss opportunities for multiple payersand the scaling of your diabetes prevention programs Discuss CPT codes for billing, coverage criteria for Medicare employer based reimbursement Learn about additional support and resources nationally and in your specific state and community MY AADE NETWORK is designed to help members learn more about what's going on at the state and local leve Continue reading >>

Indiana University Department Of Pediatrics :: Youth Diabetes Prevention Clinic

Indiana University Department Of Pediatrics :: Youth Diabetes Prevention Clinic

The Youth Diabetes Prevention Clinic is designed to clinically diagnose children and adolescents (aged 10 and up) who have evidence of prediabetes or prevalent risk factors for the development of diabetes. Our clinical treatment program utilizes the Diabetes Prevention Program modified for use in families and goal-setting strategies to implement therapeutic lifestyle change in children and their families. We also medically manage complications of overweight, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, prediabetes, and polycystic ovary syndrome in youth. The treatment model consists of medical care provided by our physician and nurse practitioners, nutritional consultation and planning with our registered dietician, and physical activity goal setting and behavior modification activities with our health coach. With continual contact with our providers, the clinic will be a local, state, and national model for the prevention of adolescent type 2 diabetes. Our Staff is Led by Physician Specialists Our physicians are pediatricians who have received additional training in pediatric endocrinology/diabetology and adolescent medicine. Our team also includes a nurse practitioner specializing in prediabetes, a registered dietitian and a health coach. Continue reading >>

Perceived Benefits And Barriers To The Diabetes Prevention Program

Perceived Benefits And Barriers To The Diabetes Prevention Program

Perceived Benefits and Barriers to the Diabetes Prevention Program Perceived Benefits and Barriers to the Diabetes Prevention Program Nicole Johnson, DrPH, MPH, MA - University of South Florida, Stephanie T. Melton, PhD, MPH, MA - University of South Florida, Diabetes prevention interventions have a proven positive effect on health outcomes. The goal of this project is to understand the factors that motivate and deter people with prediabetes from utilizing evidence-based education programs, such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Formative research was conducted among program facilitators, health providers who care for diabetes patients, and patients living with prediabetes to generate an in-depth understanding of perceptions of the program. The methodology included a mixed methods approach. A total of 97 interviews and 5 focus groups were conducted with health providers, program facilitators, and patients. An online survey was administered to 50 patients with prediabetes. All three populations agreed the DPP aided in implementing lifestyle changes and preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes, and the classes provided a positive experience for support, in-depth discussion, and opportunities for learning how to make lifestyle changes. However, while the overall benefits of the program were expressed, there were barriers noted by all populations that affect program utilization and physician referrals. General lack of knowledge, cost of the program, and the significant time commitment necessary to complete the program were barriers discussed. The Diabetes Prevention Program is successful in helping individuals with prediabetes make positive lifestyle changes. The lack of knowledge about the program, however, is a deterrent for utilization. Creation of a social marke Continue reading >>

More in diabetes