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Diabetes Prevention Program Evaluation

A Formative Evaluation Of A Diabetes Prevention Program Using The Re-aim Framework In A Learning Health Care System, Utah, 20132015

A Formative Evaluation Of A Diabetes Prevention Program Using The Re-aim Framework In A Learning Health Care System, Utah, 20132015

A Formative Evaluation of a Diabetes Prevention Program Using the RE-AIM Framework in a Learning Health Care System, Utah, 20132015 ORIGINAL RESEARCH Volume 14 July 20, 2017 Kimberly D. Brunisholz, PhD, MST1,2; Jaewhan Kim, PhD2; Lucy A. Savitz, PhD, MBA1,2; Mia Hashibe, PhD2; Lisa H. Gren, PhD2; Sharon Hamilton, MS, RN1; Kelly Huynh1; Elizabeth A. Joy, MD, MPH1,2 ( View author affiliations ) Suggested citation for this article: Brunisholz KD, Kim J, Savitz LA, Hashibe M, Gren LH, Hamilton S, et al. A Formative Evaluation of a Diabetes Prevention Program Using the RE-AIM Framework in a Learning Health Care System, Utah, 20132015. Prev Chronic Dis 2017;14:160556. DOI: . Evaluation of interventions can help to close the gap between research and practice but seldom takes place during implementation. Using the RE-AIM framework, we conducted a formative evaluation of the first year of the Intermountain Healthcare Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Adult patients who met the criteria for prediabetes (HbA1c of 5.70%6.49% or fasting plasma glucose of 100125 mg/dL) were attributed to a primary care provider from August 1, 2013, through July 31, 2014. Physicians invited eligible patients to participate in the program during an office visit. We evaluated 1) reach, with data on patient eligibility, participation, and representativeness; 2) effectiveness, with data on attaining a 5% weight loss; 3) adoption, with data on providers and clinics that referred patients to the program; and 4) implementation, with data on patient encounters. We did not measure maintenance. Of the 6,862 prediabetes patients who had an in-person office visit with their provider, 8.4% of eligible patients enrolled. Likelihood of participation was higher among patients who were female, aged 70 years or older Continue reading >>

A National Effort To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Participant-level Evaluation Of Cdc’s National Diabetes Prevention Program

A National Effort To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Participant-level Evaluation Of Cdc’s National Diabetes Prevention Program

OBJECTIVE To assess participant-level results from the first 4 years of implementation of the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP), a national effort to prevent type 2 diabetes in those at risk through structured lifestyle change programs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Descriptive analysis was performed on data from 14,747 adults enrolled in year-long type 2 diabetes prevention programs during the period February 2012 through January 2016. Data on attendance, weight, and physical activity minutes were summarized and predictors of weight loss were examined using a mixed linear model. All analyses were performed using SAS 9.3. RESULTS Participants attended a median of 14 sessions over an average of 172 days in the program (median 134 days). Overall, 35.5% achieved the 5% weight loss goal (average weight loss 4.2%, median 3.1%). Participants reported a weekly average of 152 min of physical activity (median 128 min), with 41.8% meeting the physical activity goal of 150 min per week. For every additional session attended and every 30 min of activity reported, participants lost 0.3% of body weight (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS During the first 4 years, the National DPP has achieved widespread implementation of the lifestyle change program to prevent type 2 diabetes, with promising early results. Greater duration and intensity of session attendance resulted in a higher percent of body weight loss overall and for subgroups. Focusing on retention may reduce disparities and improve overall program results. Further program expansion and investigation is needed to continue lowering the burden of type 2 diabetes nationally. Diabetes takes a significant toll on the public’s health and on our nation’s health care systems and payers. In addition to the 29 million people in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Reduction In Primary Care: Evaluation Of The Ontario Primary Care Diabetes Prevention Program | Hillmer | Can J Public Health

Diabetes Risk Reduction In Primary Care: Evaluation Of The Ontario Primary Care Diabetes Prevention Program | Hillmer | Can J Public Health

Diabetes risk reduction in primary care: Evaluation of the Ontario Primary Care Diabetes Prevention Program Michael Hillmer, Guillermo A. Sandoval, James A. Elliott, Meera Jain, Tiffany Barker, Amy Prisniak, Stoni Astley, Laura Rosella OBJECTIVES: Lifestyle interventions can reduce type 2 diabetes risk. The Primary Care Diabetes Prevention Program (PCDPP) was implemented by the Government of Ontario to lower diabetes risk. This study first evaluated the program, and second used a validated tool to estimate a potential population impact if the program were implemented more broadly in the province. METHODS: PCDPP was implemented in six primary care settings serving communities with high mortality risk due to chronic diseases. In total, 1916 adults with prediabetes or metabolic syndrome were enrolled from January 2011 to December 2012. Body weight was the primary outcome variable, and was modeled using four time periods (i.e., baseline, 3rd, 6th and 9th month). The intervention effect was estimated using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression, and was stratified by gender and age. In the population impact analysis, a number needed to treat (NNT) for the intervention to prevent one case of diabetes and an absolute number of diabetes cases averted were estimated. RESULTS: Weight loss over 9 months was 7.5% (or 6.8 kg), with 7.4% (or 6.4 kg) in females and 8.6% (or 8.6 kg) in males. When modeled, changes in weight were all statistically significant. The models for male participants predicted, however, some gains in weight in the last 3 months of the program. Dropout rates were 26.8%, 46.8% and 63.0% at 3rd, 6th and 9th month respectively. Scaling up the program would produce an NNT of approximately 36 and would avert 6401 cases of diabetes in five years. CONCLUSION: PCDP Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of A Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Intervention In Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Study In Three Senior/community Centers Of Varying Socioeconomic Status.

Evaluation Of A Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Intervention In Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Study In Three Senior/community Centers Of Varying Socioeconomic Status.

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Diabetes Educ. 2018 Apr;44(2):118-129. doi: 10.1177/0145721718759982. Epub 2018 Mar 7. Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of an adapted Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle program, DPP Group Lifestyle Balance (GLB), delivered in 3 economically diverse senior/community centers. Methods The DPP-GLB was implemented in 3 senior/community centers in Allegheny County, PA. A 6-month delayed control intervention design was used. Participants were randomized to begin the DPP-GLB immediately (immediate) or after a 6-month delay (delayed). Adults (n = 134; mean age = 62.8 years) with BMI 24 kg/m2 and prediabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome took part. Weight, physical activity (PA), and diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors were assessed at 6, 12, and 18 months from baseline. Results At 6 months, the immediate group demonstrated greater mean weight loss than the delayed control group as well as significantly greater improvements in PA, A1C, fasting insulin, and waist circumference. In pre-post analyses, both randomized groups showed similar success that was maintained at 18 months. Conclusions The DPP-GLB delivered in economically diverse community centers was effective in this group of older adults. These findings support provision of coverage for prevention programs in older adults at risk for diabetes/CVD, which is important considering the large number of individuals who will be Medicare eligible in the near future. Continue reading >>

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Background Diabetes affects more than 25 percent of Americans aged 65 or older, and its prevalence is projected to increase approximately two-fold for all U.S. adults (ages 18-79) by 2050 if current trends continue. We estimate that Medicare spent $42 billion more in the single year of 2016 on beneficiaries with diabetes than it would have spent if those beneficiaries did not have diabetes; per-beneficiary, Medicare spent an estimated $1,500 more on Part D prescription drugs, $3,100 more for hospital and facility services, and $2,700 more in physician and other clinical services for those with diabetes than those without diabetes (estimates based on fee-for-service, non-dual eligible, over age 65 beneficiaries). Fortunately, type 2 diabetes can usually be delayed or prevented with health behavior changes. The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) expanded model is a structured behavior change intervention that aims to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes among Medicare beneficiaries with an indication of prediabetes. This model is an expansion of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) model test, which was tested through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s Health Care Innovation Awards. The final rule establishing the expansion was finalized in the Calendar Year (CY) 2017 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) final rule published in November 2016. On November 2, 2017, CMS issued the CY 2018 PFS final rule, which established policies related to the set of MDPP services, including beneficiary eligibility criteria, the MDPP payment structure, and supplier enrollment requirements and compliance standards aimed to enhance program integrity. The MDPP Expanded Model The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program expanded model is a structured intervention with t Continue reading >>

Evaluating The Implementation Of The Diabetes Prevention Program In An Integrated Health System

Evaluating The Implementation Of The Diabetes Prevention Program In An Integrated Health System

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Evaluating the Implementation of the Diabetes Prevention Program in an Integrated Health System The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03249077 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting Information provided by (Responsible Party): Top of Page Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information In preparation for the roll out of the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) in 2018, Kaiser Permanente Northwest (KPNW), a large, integrated health care system, plans to pilot the implementation of DPP starting in April 2017. Patients 40 and older at high risk for diabetes will be offered DPP online or DPP in-person. A pragmatic, rigorous, quantitative and qualitative evaluation will be conducted to compare patients enrolled in DPP (either online or in-person) to those not enrolled to better inform future implementation efforts of DPP within and outside of KPNW. High rates of obesity and prediabetes among older adults pose a substantial personal and societal burden. Among U.S. adults age 60 and older, 35% have obesity and 50% have prediabetes, placing them at substantial risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer, and impaired mobility, as well as significantly elevated health care costs. Implementation of a practical and effective diabetes prevention program at the population level could have major public health benefits and could also sa Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of A Community Diabetes Prevention Program Delivered By Diabetes Educators In The United States: One-year Follow Up - Sciencedirect

Evaluation Of A Community Diabetes Prevention Program Delivered By Diabetes Educators In The United States: One-year Follow Up - Sciencedirect

Volume 106, Issue 3 , December 2014, Pages e49-e52 Evaluation of a community Diabetes Prevention Program delivered by diabetes educators in the United States: One-year follow up Author links open overlay panel M. KayeKramera The successful DPP lifestyle intervention was adapted for delivery in the community. Trained diabetes educators delivered the intervention in 3 outpatient clinics. Participants demonstrated significant weight loss between baseline and one year. Improvements in physical activity and other risk factors were also noted. Diabetes educators are an important community resource for prevention intervention. Strategies for management of pre-diabetes within the community setting are needed. An adaptation of the successful Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention delivered by trained diabetes educators was evaluated. Results indicate that trained diabetes educators offer an important community resource for health care providers for their patients with pre-diabetes. Continue reading >>

A Systematic Review Of Real-world Diabetes Prevention Programs: Learnings From The Last 15years

A Systematic Review Of Real-world Diabetes Prevention Programs: Learnings From The Last 15years

A systematic review of real-world diabetes prevention programs: learnings from the last 15years The evidence base for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has progressed rapidly from efficacy trials to real-world translational studies and practical implementation trials over the last 15years. However, evidence for the effective implementation and translation of diabetes programs and their population impact needs to be established in ways that are different from measuring program effectiveness. We report the findings of a systematic review that focuses on identifying the critical success factors for implementing diabetes prevention programs in real-world settings. A systematic review of programs aimed at diabetes prevention was undertaken in order to evaluate their outcomes using the penetration, implementation, participation, and effectiveness (PIPE) impact metric. A search for relevant articles was carried out using PubMed (March 2015) and Web of Science, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and EMBASE. A quality coding system was developed and included studies were rated independently by three researchers. Thirty eight studies were included in the review. Almost all (92%) provided details on participation; however, only 18% reported the coverage of their target population (penetration). Program intensity or implementationas measured by frequency of contacts during first year and intervention durationwas identified in all of the reported studies, and 84% of the studies also reported implementation fidelity; however, only 18% of studies employed quality assurance measures to assess the extent to which the program was delivered as planned. Sixteen and 26% of studies reported highly or moderately positive changes (effectiveness) respectively, based on weight loss. Six (16%) st Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of The Ymca Diabetes Prevention Program

Evaluation Of The Ymca Diabetes Prevention Program

Evaluation of the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program Evaluation of the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program Study connects a lifestyle intervention with health care savings Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) Type 2 diabetes widely afflicts the U.S. adult population, with more than one-third of adults at risk. In addition to the impact on patients and families, diabetes imposes a substantial burden on Medicare. According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), one in four Medicare patients has diabetes, and treating diabetes consumes one-third of Medicare spending. More than 30 years of research shows that improving diet, exercising more, and losing weight can reduce the prevalence and incidence of Type 2 diabetes. But until now, few studies tied such lifestyle interventions to health care savings. In 2012 CMS provided an $11.8 million award to the YMCA to test whether a specific education program could reduce diabetes prevalence and incidence and reduce the cost of care. The award allowed the YMCA to implement the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) at more than 250 locations in 11 states. An Educational Diet and Exercise Program Designed to Help Patients Lower the Risk of Becoming Diabetic Individuals with pre-diabetes aged 65 and over were invited to participate in the YMCA program, which was intended to help participants lose 5 percent of their total body weight and to gradually increase their physical activity to 150 minutes per week. Prediabetics have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, making them at higher risk for developing diabetes. The CDC reports that losing 5 to 7 percent of body weight reduces the risk that prediabetes will progress to diabetes by 58 perce Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program: Evaluation And Management Of Diabetes. Response To Adler And Turner And Singer Et Al The Dpp Research Group.

The Diabetes Prevention Program: Evaluation And Management Of Diabetes. Response To Adler And Turner And Singer Et Al The Dpp Research Group.

The diabetes prevention program: evaluation and management of diabetes. Response to Adler and Turner and Singer et al The DPP Research Group. Diabetes Care 1999 Oct; 22(10): 1757-1758. This is a PDF-only article. The first page of the PDF of this article appears below. Pay Per Article - You may access this article (from the computer you are currently using) for 1 day for US$35.00 Regain Access - You can regain access to a recent Pay per Article purchase if your access period has not yet expired. Sign In to Email Alerts with your Email Address Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Diabetes Care. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address. Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas. (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Diabetes Care (Your Name) thought you would like to see this page from the Diabetes Care web site. The diabetes prevention program: evaluation and management of diabetes. Response to Adler and Turner and Singer et al The DPP Research Group. Diabetes Care Oct 1999, 22 (10) 1757-1758; DOI: 10.2337/diacare.22.10.1757a Continue reading >>

Dpp-group Lifestyle Balance Publications

Dpp-group Lifestyle Balance Publications

Driver, Simon, Reynolds, Megan, Woolsey, Anne, Callender, Librada, Prajapati, Purvi K, Bennett, Monica, Kramer, Kaye. Impact of a Community-Based Healthy Lifestyle Program on Individuals With Traumatic Brain Injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2018 Jan 30. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000372. Wardian, J, True, M, Sauerwein, T, Watson, N, Hoover, A. Evaluation of the Group Lifestyle Balance Program in a Military Setting: An Investment Worth Expanding. Military Medicine. 2018;183:e138-e143. Driver, S, Reynolds, M, Kramer, K. Modifying an evidence-based lifestyle programme for individuals with traumatic brain injury . Brain Injury. July, 2017, 1-5. PMID:28750178PMID:28750178DOI: 10.1080/02699052.2017.1346286 Eaglehouse YL, Schafer GL, Arena VC, Kramer MK, Miller RG, Kriska AM. Impact of a community-based lifestyle intervention program on health-related quality of life. Qual Life Res. 2016 Aug;25(8):1903-12. doi: 10.1007/s11136-016-1240-7. Epub 2016 Feb 20. PubMed PMID: 26896960. Rosas LG, Lv N, Xiao L, Lewis MA, Zavella P, Kramer MK, Luna V, Ma J. Evaluation of a culturally-adapted lifestyle intervention to treat elevated cardiometabolic risk of Latino adults in primary care (Vida Sana): A randomized controlled trial . Contemporary Clinical Trials. 2016 Mar 16;48:30-40. PMID:26995280. doi:10.1016/j.cct.2016.03.003. Eaglehouse YL, Rockette-Wagner B, Kramer MK, Arena VC,Miller RG, Vanderwood KK, Kriska AM. Physical activity levels in a community lifestyle intervention: a randomized trial. Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2016; 1(5): 45-51. Ma, J., Yank, V., Nan, Lv, Goldhaber-Fiebertc, J., Lewisd, Kramer, MK, Snowden, M., Rosas, LG., Xiaoa, L., Blonstein, A. Research Aimed at Improving both Mood and Weight (RAINBOW) in Primary Care: A Type 1 Hybrid Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program Has Promising Results Over First 4 Years

Diabetes Prevention Program Has Promising Results Over First 4 Years

Diabetes Prevention Program Has Promising Results Over First 4 Years The study found that the more classes the participants took, the more weight they lost. The DPP is set to begin in Medicare in January 2018. Early returns on the National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) show its working, and that the higher the level of participation, the better the results. A study published Friday in Diabetes Care evaluated data from 14,747 adults who took part in the yearlong program between February 2012 and January 2016, and found that participants took part in an average of 14 sessions over an age of 172 days. The average weight loss was 4.2%, and the median weight loss was 3.1%. The study also found that 41.8% met the physical activity goal of 150 minutes per week. The study found a direct connection between the number of classes a person attended and the results: For every additional session attended and 30 minutes of physical activity, participants lost 0.3% of body weight. This may have important implications for program design, as both CMS and groups that offer the DPP look to boost retention rates. The DPP seeks to help participants with prediabetes lose between 5% and 7% of body weight, a level that that is considered transformational because evidence shows it greatly reduces the likelihood that the person will progress to type 2 diabetes (T2D). The National DPP was launched in 2010, after the National Institutes of Health developed the program and published the results from a clinical trial on its effects in 2002. Findings show the program reduced the risk progression to diabetes by 58%, and by 71% for those age 65 and older. As the population ages, CMS is looking for ways to reduce the share that ends up with T2D, because already $1 of every $3 in Medicare spend is on Continue reading >>

A Community-based Diabetes Prevention Program: Evaluation Of The Group Lifestyle Balance Program Delivered By Diabetes Educators.

A Community-based Diabetes Prevention Program: Evaluation Of The Group Lifestyle Balance Program Delivered By Diabetes Educators.

1. Diabetes Educ. 2011 Sep-Oct;37(5):659-68. doi: 10.1177/0145721711411930. A community-based diabetes prevention program: evaluation of the group lifestyle balance program delivered by diabetes educators. Kramer MK(1), McWilliams JR(2), Chen HY(1), Siminerio LM(3). (1)The Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Kramer, Ms Chen) (2)The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania (Ms McWilliams) (3)The School of Medicine and Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Siminerio) PURPOSE: With growing numbers of people at risk for diabetes and cardiovasculardisease, diabetes educators report increasing referrals for intervention inprevention of these conditions. Diabetes educators have expertise in diabetesself-management education; however, they are generally not prepared for delivery of chronic disease primary prevention. The purpose of this project was todetermine if individuals at risk for diabetes who participate in an intervention delivered by trained diabetes educators in existing diabetes self-managementeducation community-based programs can reduce risk factors for diabetes andcardiovascular disease.METHODS: Diabetes educators in 3 outpatient-hospital programs (urban, suburban,and rural) received training and support for implementation of the GroupLifestyle Balance program, an adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Programlifestyle intervention, from the Diabetes Prevention Support Center of theUniversity of Pittsburgh. Adults with prediabetes and/or the metabolic syndromewere eligible to enroll in the program with physician referral. With use ofexisting diabetes educator networks, recruitment was completed via on-sitephysician in-services, informa Continue reading >>

Miami-dade Matters :: Promising Practices :: Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Miami-dade Matters :: Promising Practices :: Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Home > Promising Practices > YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program The YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program is a lifestyle modification program based on the National Diabetes Prevention Program, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and based on study results from the National Institutes of Health. Study results showed that lifestyle programs improving healthy eating and physical activity habits decreased body weight by five to seven percent and reduced the incidence of diabetes among those at risk for the disease by 58 percent. The YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, is a year-long program with 16 one-hour classroom sessions and monthly maintenance. A trained lifestyle coach helps participants learn strategies for healthy eating, physical activity and other lifestyle changes. After the initial 16 sessions, participants meet monthly for up to a year for additional support to help them maintain their progress with the ultimate goal of reducing their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The goal is for participants to lose seven percent of their body weight and increase their physical activity to 150 minutes per week in order to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Since implementation, 168 individuals have enrolled in the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program at various YMCA branches, which have offered 25 classes to date. These participants have attended an average of 11 out of 16 core sessions. Below are class participation statistics since August 2010*: Those who have completed one full program year: 72 Those who have completed the Core 16 sessions: 138 Those participating in Maintenance Classes: 10 *These numbers change on a quarterly basis. Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of The Pennsylvania Department Of Healths Diabetes Prevention Program - Phmc Research & Evaluation Group

Evaluation Of The Pennsylvania Department Of Healths Diabetes Prevention Program - Phmc Research & Evaluation Group

Evaluation of the Pennsylvania Department of Healths Diabetes Prevention Program The public health issue: Diabetes continues to be a life threatening condition for tens of millions of Americans. A diabetes diagnosis increases the risk of severe health problems including blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, and loss of toes, feet, or legs. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed through engagement in the CDCs Diabetes Prevention Program, which instructs on weight loss, healthy eating and physical activity. Our contribution to the client: The Pennsylvania Department of Healths Diabetes Prevention and Control Program enlisted PHMCs Research & Evaluation Group to evaluate and support its statewide Diabetes Prevention Program initiative. Our team collaborates with regional partners to collect quarterly data on program site recruitment, participant successes, and system-wide barriers to successful program delivery. The Research & Evaluation Groups formative reports allow for real-time adjustments and improvements to program structure and implementation. The Research & Evaluation Group has also assisted in developing tools for sustainability plan tracking, cost-benefit analysis, and staff feedback collection. As the Pennsylvania Department of Health continues to support growth of this program, the Research & Evaluation Group has expanded evaluation to include client-level health data. The Pennsylvania Department of Health, as evidenced in our evaluation work, continues to successfully grow reach and increase access to the program for Pennsylvanians. Annually, Research & Evaluation Group presents state maps, designed through ArcGIS software, documenting Pennsylvania Department of Health Diabetes Prevention Program (PADOH DPP) partner sites and number of adults Continue reading >>

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