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Diabetes Prevention Policy

Modeling The Impact Of Prevention Policies On Future Diabetes Prevalence In The United States: 20102030

Modeling The Impact Of Prevention Policies On Future Diabetes Prevalence In The United States: 20102030

Modeling the impact of prevention policies on future diabetes prevalence in the United States: 20102030 Gregg et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2013 Although diabetes is one of the most costly and rapidly increasing serious chronic diseases worldwide, the optimal mix of strategies to reduce diabetes prevalence has not been determined. Using a dynamic model that incorporates national data on diabetes prevalence and incidence, migration, mortality rates, and intervention effectiveness, we project the effect of five hypothetical prevention policies on future US diabetes rates through 2030: 1) no diabetes prevention strategy; 2) a high-risk strategy, wherein adults with both impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (fasting plasma glucose of 100124mg/dl) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (2-hour post-load glucose of 141199mg/dl) receive structured lifestyle intervention; 3) a moderate-risk strategy, wherein only adults with IFG are offered structured lifestyle intervention; 4) a population-wide strategy, in which the entire population is exposed to broad risk reduction policies; and 5) a combined strategy, involving both the moderate-risk and population-wide strategies. We assumed that the moderate- and high-risk strategies reduce the annual diabetes incidence rate in the targeted subpopulations by 12.5% through 2030 and that the population-wide approach would reduce the projected annual diabetes incidence rate by 2% in the entire US population. We project that by the year 2030, the combined strategy would prevent 4.6 million incident cases and 3.6 million prevalent cases, attenuating the increase in diabetes prevalence by 14%. The moderate-risk approach is projected to prevent 4.0 million incident cases, 3.1 million prevalent cases, attenuating the increase in prevalence by 12 Continue reading >>

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Enrollment Is Now Open

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Enrollment Is Now Open

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Enrollment is Now Open by Darlene S. Davis , Amanda Makki , Macy L. Flinchum As of January 1, 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) began enrolling suppliers in its new Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP). If successfully enrolled prior to April 1, 2018, MDPP suppliers may begin furnishing and billing for services under the MDPP program as of that date. [1]The MDPP model is an expansion of CMSs Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) model tested under the authority of Section 1115A of the Social Security Act. CMS first introduced the MDPP expanded model in its Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) final rule for Calendar Year (CY) 2017 (2017 Final Rule). [2]In the MPFS final rule for CY 2018 (2018 Final Rule), CMS finalized additional program guidance and implementation information, including implementing supplier standards and enrollment requirements and establishing payment rates. [3]Recently, CMS released the new enrollment application form [4]for MDPP suppliers and subregulatory guidance on the enrollment process. [5] In the United States, type 2 diabetes affects over 25 percent of individuals age 65 and over, and its prevalence is projected to double for all adults ages 18-79 by 2050 if current trends continue. [6]Given the substantial health care costs expended in treating diabetes and related comorbidities, the goal of the MDPP is to test a method of preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes among Medicare beneficiaries with an indication of prediabetes in hopes of decreasing the incidence rate of type 2 diabetes and ultimately cutting health care costs by creating a healthier population. MDPP seeks to prevent diabetes through a structured behavioral chan Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: Global Health Policy And Perspectives From The Ground

Diabetes Prevention: Global Health Policy And Perspectives From The Ground

Diabetes prevention: global health policy and perspectives from the ground Michael Bergman ,*,1 Martin Buysschaert ,2 Peter EH Schwarz ,3 Ann Albright ,4 KM Venkat Narayan ,5 and Derek Yach 6 1NYU School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, 345 East 37th Street, Suite 313, New York, New York 10016, USA 3Department for Prevention & Care of Diabetes, Medical Clinic III, University Clinic Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstr.74, 01307 Dresden, Germany 4Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA 1NYU School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, 345 East 37th Street, Suite 313, New York, New York 10016, USA 2Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Endocrinology & Diabetology, University Clinic Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium 3Department for Prevention & Care of Diabetes, Medical Clinic III, University Clinic Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstr.74, 01307 Dresden, Germany 4Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA 5Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA 6Global Health & Agriculture Policy, PepsiCo 700 Anderson Hill Rd, Purchase, NY 10577, USA *Author for correspondence: Tel.: +1 212 481 1350; Fax: +1 212 481 1355; [email protected] See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Type 2 diabetes and other noncommunicable diseases are a growing public health challenge globally. An estimated 285 million people, corresponding to 6.4% of the worlds adult population, has diabetes, which is expected to reach 552 million by the International Diabet Continue reading >>

The State Of Diabetes Prevention Policy In The Usa Following The Affordable Care Act.

The State Of Diabetes Prevention Policy In The Usa Following The Affordable Care Act.

Curr Diab Rep. 2016 Jun;16(6):55. doi: 10.1007/s11892-016-0742-6. The State of Diabetes Prevention Policy in the USA Following the Affordable Care Act. Preventive Medicine Residency, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, 1900 W Polk Street, Room 901, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA. Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. American Medical Association, Improving Health Outcomes, 330 N Wabash, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. [email protected] Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem in the USA, affecting over 12% of American adults and imposing considerable health and economic burden on individuals and society. There is a strong evidence base demonstrating that lifestyle behavioral changes and some medications can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in high risk adults, and several policy and healthcare system changes motivated by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) have the potential to accelerate diabetes prevention. In this narrative review, we (1) offer a conceptual framework for organizing how the ACA may influence diabetes prevention efforts at the level of individuals, healthcare providers, and health systems; (2) highlight ACA provisions at each of these levels that could accelerate type 2 diabetes prevention nationwide; and (3) explore possible policy gaps and opportunity areas for future research and action. Affordable Care Act; Diabetes; Health policy; Prediabetes; Primary prevention Images from this publication. See all images (1) Free text The Diabetes Prevention Care Continuum. Policies, systems, and environmental changes are conceptualiz Continue reading >>

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Background Diabetes affects more than 25 percent of Americans aged 65 or older, and its prevalence is projected to increase approximately two-fold for all U.S. adults (ages 18-79) by 2050 if current trends continue. We estimate that Medicare spent $42 billion more in the single year of 2016 on beneficiaries with diabetes than it would have spent if those beneficiaries did not have diabetes; per-beneficiary, Medicare spent an estimated $1,500 more on Part D prescription drugs, $3,100 more for hospital and facility services, and $2,700 more in physician and other clinical services for those with diabetes than those without diabetes (estimates based on fee-for-service, non-dual eligible, over age 65 beneficiaries). Fortunately, type 2 diabetes can usually be delayed or prevented with health behavior changes. The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) expanded model is a structured behavior change intervention that aims to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes among Medicare beneficiaries with an indication of prediabetes. This model is an expansion of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) model test, which was tested through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s Health Care Innovation Awards. The final rule establishing the expansion was finalized in the Calendar Year (CY) 2017 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) final rule published in November 2016. On November 2, 2017, CMS issued the CY 2018 PFS final rule, which established policies related to the set of MDPP services, including beneficiary eligibility criteria, the MDPP payment structure, and supplier enrollment requirements and compliance standards aimed to enhance program integrity. The MDPP Expanded Model The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program expanded model is a structured intervention with t Continue reading >>

Proposed Policies For The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Expanded Model In The Calendar Year 2018 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule

Proposed Policies For The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Expanded Model In The Calendar Year 2018 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule

Proposed Policies for the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Expanded Model in the Calendar Year 2018 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule [email protected] Proposed Policies for the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Expanded Model in the Calendar Year 2018 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule On July 13, 2017, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued the Calendar Year (CY) 2018 Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) proposed rule that would make additional proposals to implement the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) expanded model starting in 2018. The MDPP expanded model was announced in early 2016, when it was determined that the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) model test through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s Health Care Innovation Awards met the statutory criteria for expansion. Through expansion of this model test, more Medicare beneficiaries will be able to access evidence-based diabetes prevention services, potentially resulting in a lowered rate of progression to type 2 diabetes, improved health, and reduced costs. The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program expanded model is a structured intervention with the goal of preventing progression to type 2 diabetes in individuals with an indication of pre-diabetes. The clinical intervention, the result of National Institutes of Health-funded research, consists of a minimum of 16 intensive “core” sessions of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) approved curriculum furnished over six months in a group-based, classroom-style setting that provides practical training in long-term dietary change, increased physical activity, and behavior change strategies for weight control. After completing the core sessions, less intensive follow-up meetings furnished monthly wi Continue reading >>

Webinar: Medicaid Coverage For The National Diabetes Prevention Program: Assessing Policy Options And Making The Case For Coverage

Webinar: Medicaid Coverage For The National Diabetes Prevention Program: Assessing Policy Options And Making The Case For Coverage

Webinar: Medicaid Coverage for the National Diabetes Prevention Program: Assessing Policy Options and Making the Case for Coverage This webinar will focus on specific steps that public health departments, Medicaid agencies, Medicaid managed care organizations (MCO), and other public health advocates can take to make Medicaid coverage for the National DPP lifestyle change program a reality within their state. The National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) lifestyle change program is increasingly being covered by public and private payersincluding Medicare, which will offer the lifestyle change program as a covered benefit starting in April 2018. A number of states are also currently covering the program for Medicaid beneficiaries, and more are considering the path towards coverage. This webinar will focus on specific steps that public health departments, Medicaid agencies, Medicaid managed care organizations (MCO), and other public health advocates can take to make Medicaid coverage for the National DPP lifestyle change program a reality within their state. During this webinar, NACDD and Leavitt Partners will share information and expertise gained from collaborations with states working towards coverage. This work includes a demonstration project with Maryland and Oregon to develop and test models for Medicaid coverage of the National DPP, and extensive research with public and private payers. By participating in this webinar, chronic disease directors, directors of health promotion, and chronic disease program practitioners will be able to: Identify various pathways available to Medicaid agencies and Medicaid MCOs to achieve coverage of the National DPP lifestyle change program for Medicaid beneficiaries in their state. Identify the elements of operationalizin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention In Michigan

Diabetes Prevention In Michigan

At the Michigan Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, we work with partners across the state to educate and inform the public and health care providers about the facts on diabetes prevention and provide links to resources. The Michigan Diabetes Prevention Action Plan, 2016-2018 represents best thinking of public health professionals and interested citizens concerned about the burden of diabetes and prediabetes within our state. The plan includes three strategic areas of focus and targeted goals and objectives to reduce the burden of prediabetes in Michigan. For more information, contact Tamah Gustafson at [email protected] What is prediabetes? Who is at high risk? Prediabetes is a condition where people have a blood glucose level slightly higher than normal, but not yet considered diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes can be prevented! Research shows that people with prediabetes and those at high risk could significantly reduce their risk of diabetes by making modest lifestyle changes–lose 5-7% body weight and be physically active at least 150 minutes a week (at least 5 days, 30 minutes of moderate physical activity). Just making these changes for life, goes a long way to lower risk of diabetes. Some other risk factors for diabetes are: being over overweight or obese, not physically active, older than 45 years, having family history or a history of gestational diabetes. Learn your risk by taking this simple test or Take the Quiz at cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/ (on right side of page) What is the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)? The good news is that people with prediabetes may delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and possibly return their blood glucose levels to normal by participating in a national program called the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP). This e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention | Louisvilleky.gov

Diabetes Prevention | Louisvilleky.gov

The Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness is a subsidiary of the Kentucky Diabetes Prevention and Control program, a member of the Healthy Living with Diabetes Program, and Accredited by the American Assoication of Diabetes Educators. Diabetes has become an all too familiar disease. Few of us can say that we, or someone we know, are not effected by its reach. More than 1 in 10 adults in Louisville currently live with Diabetes. Many factos can lead to the development of diabetes including poor diet, low activity, family history, and ethnicity It is a SERIOUS condition where the body can no longer ocntrol the amount of glucose int he blood. Those with diabetes, who do not actively control their condition are at a higher risk for developing other serious health problems suchas kidney disease, heart disease, amputation, and blindness. Beause of tis associated risks, diabetes is also and expensive disease. This cost can be an even larger burdgen for those already living in poverty. A person with prediabetes has a blood sugar level higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. He or she is at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems, including heart disease, and stroke. Could you have prediabetes? Take the quiz and find out if you are at risk. Click on the prediabetes test widget below and answer the seven questions to get your prediabetes score. Knowing your risk is the first step to treating or preventing diabetes. If you are at risk, or have already been diagnosed, there are several programs that can help you take care of yourself. Please call 502-574-6663 to engage with local services or for help understanding yout risk. Louisville Metro Public Health and IDEASx Lab A new series of billboards Continue reading >>

Programs & Initiatives Through Policy State Employees Receive Diabetes Prevention Program

Programs & Initiatives Through Policy State Employees Receive Diabetes Prevention Program

State Employees Receive Diabetes Prevention Program Recent research shows the number of new cases of diabetes in the US has declined from 1.7 million in 2008 to 1.4 million in 2014. The report states that lifestyle changes like reducing calorie intake, limiting soda consumption, and increased physical activity may have contributed to the drop in diagnoses. While the risk of developing type 2 diabetes has slowed down, the rate of prediabetes is still on the rise. Thats why the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) continues efforts to increase access for all Minnesotans to CDCs proven Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which supports positive lifestyle changes for people who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. In April 2015, the State of Minnesota began offering this proven program as a covered benefit for all Minnesota State employees and their dependents. Securing and implementing the DPP as a benefit for State Employees was a collaborative effort. Minnesota Department of Healths Diabetes Unit along with key stakeholders created the statewide Minnesota Diabetes Collective Impact Initiative. This group developed a common purpose and agenda, identifying coverage of the DPP for State employees as a priority. Collaboration and leadership from the State Employees Insurance Plan (SEGIP) was essential to reaching this goal. The State of Minnesota has already seen great success from offering the program as a covered benefit. The program not only shows people how to take charge of their health and make lasting changes, it also helps the State cut down on health care spending. Diabetes care and management costs Minnesota an estimated $3.1 billion a year. By offering the DPP, the State is working to reduce the number of people with type 2 diabetes and the healthcare costs assoc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

Prediabeteshappens when a person's blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Without lifestyle changes most people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five to six years. Are 5 to 15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, Have a higher risk for heart disease and stroke. You are overweight or obese (BMI 25kg/m), You are inactive (do not get regular physical activity), You have a family history of diabetes (sibling, parent), You had gestational diabetes and/or delivered 9lb. baby, You are African American, Hispanic, Asian, Pacific Islander, or American Indian. If your score shows you are at high risk for prediabetes, talk to your health care provider and ask to be tested for prediabetes. Your health care provider may do a simple blood test to find out if you have prediabetes. THE NATIONAL DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU! The Centers for Disease Controls (CDC)National Diabetes Prevention Programis an evidence-based (proven to work based on research) lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes: TheDiabetes Prevention Programresearch study showed that making reasonable behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weightthat is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. It can help people cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. These lifestyle changes (healthy eating, increased physical activity) reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with prediabetes! People who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes work with a trained lifestyle coach in a group setting during the year-long program. Tennessee National Diabetes Prevention Programs Continue reading >>

Ymcas Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymcas Diabetes Prevention Program

You can reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes and gain tools for healthy living. If you are risk for type 2 diabetes, the YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program provides a supportive environment where you can work with others in a small group setting to learn how to adopt healthy habits to reduce your chances of developing the disease. The program, which is led by a trained Lifestyle Coach in a classroom setting, is delivered over a 12-month period, beginning with 16 weekly sessions and three sessions every other week during the first six months followed by 6 monthly sessions in the second six months. You will learn strategies for eating healthier, increasing your physical activity and making other changes that will improve your overall health and well-being. National institutes of Health research has proven that programs like the YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program can reduce the number of cases of type 2 diabetes by almost 58% and 71% in adults over the age of 60. Overall structure of the diabetes prevention program: A trained lifestyle coach facilitates a small group of participants in learning about healthier eating, physical activity and other behavior changes over the course of 16 one-hour sessions. Topics covered include healthier eating, getting started with physical activity, overcoming stress, staying motivated and more. * Individuals who have already been diagnoses with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes do not qualify for this program. To receive additional information or to see if you qualify for the program, contact the Diabetes Prevention ProgramCoordinator, at 267-592-4383 or [email protected] . Are you interested in another class location/day? Call us at 267-592-4383! Only 8-10 people are needed to start a class. With enough interest, classes can form that easil Continue reading >>

Strategic Priorities And Objectives-diabetes

Strategic Priorities And Objectives-diabetes

Strategic Priorities and Objectives-Diabetes The Georgia DPCP seeks to utilize diabetes surveillance data, coupled with multi-sector partnerships and collaborative efforts to advance policies and support the adoption of evidence-based guidelines in an effort to sustain quality-oriented healthcare services as well as expand access to evidence-based Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) Programs and Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPP) statewide. Cornerstone of the Georgia Diabetes Prevention and Control Program: Access to Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Preventive Care Resources Diabetes Data Surveillance and Evaluation Health Communication: Diabetes Prevention and Diabetes Management The Georgia DPCP is part of a national effort by the CDC Division of Diabetes Translation and is focused on the following statewide efforts to improve the health of Georgians. Access Related to Primary and Secondary Prevention To reduce the onset and severity of diabetes-related complications among Georgians statewide (including medically underserved regions) by collaborating with organizations to expand access to nationally recognized and evidence-based Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) Programs including: American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Accredited DSME Programs American Diabetes Association (ADA) Recognized Diabetes Education Programs To reduce risks among Georgia adults at "high risk" for developing Diabetes including adults diagnosed with Prediabetes (also known as Borderline Diabetes) by collaborating with organizations to increase the availability of evidence-based Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPP) in various settings. To reduce the onset and severity of diabetes-related complications among vulnerable population groups including: women with Continue reading >>

The State Of Diabetes Prevention Policy In The Usa Following The Affordable Care Act

The State Of Diabetes Prevention Policy In The Usa Following The Affordable Care Act

The State of Diabetes Prevention Policy in the USA Following the Affordable Care Act 1Preventive Medicine Residency, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, 1900 W Polk Street, Room 901, Chicago, IL 60612, USA Find articles by Juleigh Nowinski Konchak 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 3American Medical Association, Improving Health Outcomes, 330 N Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 1Preventive Medicine Residency, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, 1900 W Polk Street, Room 901, Chicago, IL 60612, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 3American Medical Association, Improving Health Outcomes, 330 N Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611, USA The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Curr Diab Rep See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem in the USA, affecting over 12 % of American adults and imposing considerable health and economic burden on individuals and society. There is a strong evidence base demonstrating that lifestyle behavioral changes and some medications can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in high risk adults, and several policy and healthcare system changes motivated by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) have the potential to accelerate diabetes prevention. I Continue reading >>

Advocating For Diabetes Prevention

Advocating For Diabetes Prevention

The AMA’s Advocacy Work to Prevent Diabetes As part of the AMA's Improving Health Outcomes initiative, the AMA is committing its resources, expertise and reach to prevent type 2 diabetes and to improve outcomes for those suffering from this disease. This includes collaborations with the YMCA of the USA and the CDC to increase physician screening and testing of patients for prediabetes and referrals of at-risk patients to National Diabetes Prevention Programs (NDPPs). Key Legislation the AMA has Supported to Prevent Diabetes National Diabetes Clinical Care Commission Act (S.586): Introduced on Feb. 26, 2015, by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.). The legislation creates a commission that will focus on improving diabetes care delivery, patient outcomes and cost effectiveness. The AMA joined the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and other groups in supporting this legislation. A companion bill (H.R.1192) was introduced in the House by Rep. Pete Olson (R-TX) on March 2, 2015. Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act of 2015 (S. 1131/H.R. 2102): Introduced by Senator Al Franken (D-Minn.) and Rep. Susan Davis (D-Calif.) on April 29, 2015. This bipartisan bill provides coverage for the NDPP under the Medicare program. The NDPP at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a public-private partnership that provides low-cost, evidence-based community programs to prevent diabetes. Providing Medicare coverage for the NDPP helps seniors prevent diabetes and other chronic illnesses. The AMA joined the American Diabetes Association and others from the medical community in expressing its support for this legislation. Medicare takes steps toward authorizing coverage for NDPP: Announced by HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell in March 2016. This announcement stated that Medicare was Continue reading >>

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