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Diabetes Prevention

Scripps Diabetes Prevention Program

Scripps Diabetes Prevention Program

The Scripps Diabetes Prevention Program is part of the National Diabetes Prevention Program, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is proven to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay development of Type 2 diabetes. The Scripps Diabetes Prevention Program is free and can help people with prediabetes cut their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in half. The Diabetes Prevention Program research study showed that making modest behavior changes helped participants lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight — that is 10 to 14 pounds for a person weighing 200 pounds. These lifestyle changes reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent in people with prediabetes. Learn who is most at risk for developing prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes. CDC-approved curriculum Group support Year-long program — weekly for 4 months, then monthly for 8 months — to keep our health on track Can I prevent Type 2 diabetes? If you’ve heard your doctor say, “You’re at risk for Type 2 diabetes” or “You have prediabetes,” it means that you can start preventing Type 2 diabetes today. And you do not have to do it alone. If you have prediabetes, now is the time for prevention. As part of the Scripps Diabetes Prevention Program group, you will work with other participants and a trained lifestyle coach to learn the skills you need to make lasting changes. These changes include losing a modest amount of weight, being more physically active and managing stress. Being part of a group provides support from other people who are facing similar challenges and trying to make the same changes you are. Together you can celebrate successes and find ways to overcome obstacles. The Scripps Diabetes Prevention Program groups meet for a year — weekly for the f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major multicenter clinical research study aimed at discovering whether modest weight loss through dietary changes and increased physical activity or treatment with the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in study participants. At the beginning of the DPP, participants were all overweight and had blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes - a condition called prediabetes. The DPP found that participants who lost a modest amount of weight through dietary changes and increased physical activity sharply reduced their chances of developing diabetes. Taking metformin also reduced risk, although less dramatically. The DPP resolved its research questions earlier than projected and, following the recommendation of an external monitoring board, the study was halted a year early. The researchers published their findings in the February 7, 2002, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine . In the DPP, participants from 27 clinical centers around the United States were randomly divided into different treatment groups. The first group, called the lifestyle intervention group, received intensive training in diet, physical activity, and behavior modification. By eating less fat and fewer calories and exercising for a total of 150 minutes a week, they aimed to lose 7 percent of their body weight and maintain that loss. The second group took 850 mg of metformin twice a day. The third group received placebo pills instead of metformin. The metformin and placebo groups also received information about diet and exercise but no intensive motivational counseling. A fourth group was treated with the drug troglitazone (Rezu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program

Diabetes Prevention Program

Prediabetes is a serious condition affecting 1 out of 3 adults. Thats 84 million people! Prevent type 2 diabetes and cut your risk in half with a proven lifestyle change program. This FREE Diabetes Prevention Program runs for a period of 12 months. This 12-month lifestyle modification program offers nutritional guidance, blood glucose screening and support to help prevent or delay diabetes onset. Throughout the program, our licensed dietician-nutritionist will give participants the help and support they need to make and sustain lifestyle changes to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. During the first 6 months of the program, you will meet about once a week. During the second 6 months, youll meet once or twice a month. Staying in the program for the full year is essential to help you stick to new habits and avoid slipping back into old habits.Participants receive tools to help them monitor activity patterns, eating habits and physical activity to assist them in achieving success. Giant uses the PreventT2 curriculum, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Lose 5% or more of your current body weight Gradually increase your physical activity to at least 150 minutes per week Next class starts September 2017! See locations and times below. 1400 7TH STREET NW, WASHINGTON,DC - Wednesdays @ 2:00 PM 601 EAST 33RD STREET, BALTIMORE, MD - Wednesdays @ 1:30 PM 7546 ANNAPOLIS ROAD, LANHAM, MD - Wednesdays @ 7:00 PM 1155 ANNAPOLIS RD, ODENTON, MD - Thursdays @ 6:00 PM 9200 BALT. NAT. PK., ELLICOTT CITY, MD - Tuesdays @ 12 PM & 6 PM 621 EAST GLEBE RD, ALEXANDRIA, VA - Thursdays @ 6:00 PM 1454 CHAIN BRIDGE RD, MCLEAN, VA - Tuesdays @ 6:00 PM 5701 PLANK ROAD, FREDERICKSBURG, VA - Saturdays @ 9:00 AM Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

While Type 1 diabetes is not preventable, Type 2 diabetes can be with weight loss and moderate physical activity. The following links have important information about diabetes and prevention. Bogus diabetes products are flooding the marketplace, especially the internet. Be cautious when you see bold product claims which make unrealistic promises. Watch this video to learn more. “An estimated 86 million Americans over age 20 have prediabetes. 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years and they are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke. The risk of death for adults with diabetes is 59% higher than for adults without diabetes. (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Preventing Diabetes Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality - Diabetes Prevention National Institutes of Health - Cardiac Bypass Surgery Prediabetes The CDC is a great resource for prediabetes, and general diabetes prevention. Look at the following links for tips on prediabetes, facts, and other helpful information. Food Labeling Food can make a big difference with diabetes management. The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. Learn more about healthier food options, labeling, and nutrition below. Healthy Lifestyle and Healthy People 2020 Lifestyle is important in diabetes management. This box includes information about being active and healthy, as well as several initiatives and campaigns from across the government. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Healthy People 2020 initiative, aims to i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

1. Are you at risk for prediabetes? Find out by taking the quiz to the left! 2. At RISK? Find out if you qualify for the 3. The YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program is based on National Institutes of Health studies and approved by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. for program registration, locations, and Y membership opportunity! The YMCA'S Diabetes Prevention Program Overview There's no denying it - Diabetes is a serious, debilitating condition. By increasing blood sugar to higher than normal levels, it increases your likelihood for other severe health complications such as heart disease, kidney failure, and stroke. While there's no cure for diabetes, programs like the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can help ensure that it's not inevitable. Research by the National Institutes of Health has shown that programs like the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can reduce the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes by 58% and 71% in adults over the age of 60. By enrolling in the program, you'll become empowered with the knowledge and discipline to improve your lifestyle and reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes through healthy diet and energizing exercise. 16 weekly sessions, then 8 monthly followup sessions Small groups for a supportive environment Learn about eating healthier & increasing physical Continue reading >>

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

The numbers don't lie1 in 3 American adults has prediabetes. With a little exercise and a change in diet, it often can be reversed. Let's face it, there are millions of reasons why we don't find the time to make healthy lifestyle choices. Kids, jobs, cat videos on the Internet we're busy. But whatever your reason, prediabetes is real. Congratulations on taking your first steps and find out if you have prediabetes by taking the test now. You won't regret it. Prediabetes means a person's blood glucose (sugar) level is higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. People with prediabetes are on the road to develop type 2 diabetes and are also at increased risk for serious health problems such as stroke and heart disease. Prediabetes often can be reversed through lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity and weight loss. The earlier people are diagnosed with prediabetes, the more likely that they can reverse it and prevent type 2 diabetes. Still have questions? See FAQ The good news is you can reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes and gain tools for healthy living. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

If you are at-risk for diabetes or have prediabetes, you can take steps to reverse it. The Diabetes Prevention Program is an evidence-based program that can help you make lifestyle changes to greatly reduce your risk for or delay the onset of diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program has locations throughout Massachusetts. Find out if there is a program site near you. You’ll learn about how to eat healthier, how to add physical activity into your day, and how to manage stress. Groups of 8 to 15 people start the program at the same time. The groups are led by a trained Lifestyle Coach who helps and motivates you to make lifestyle changes that are right for you. DPP takes one year to complete. The first six months you’ll meet once a week to get started. Then for the next six months you meet one time each month to stay on track. Watch the video below on how DPP has made a difference in people’s lives. Who is Eligible for DPP? To participate, individuals must meet be: 18 years or older Overweight or obese In addition individuals must meet one of the three following criteria: Have been diagnosed with prediabetes (Fasting Blood Glucose 100-124 mg/dL, Hemoglobin A1C 5.7-6.4%, Oral Glucose Tolerance Test 140-199 mg/dL) Previously diagnosed with gestational diabetes Established risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes (use ADA Risk Test) if blood test not available Does the Diabetes Prevention Program work? The program is based on randomized-control trial showing that changes in lifestyle reduced type 2 diabetes risk among participants by 58% (70% for those over the age of 60). The two lifestyle changes that were studied were: Losing 7% of bodyweight (about 15 lbs. if you weigh 200 lbs.) Exercising at least 150 minutes a week (about 30 minutes, five days a week) People Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The purpose of the present article is to provide a detailed description of the highly successful lifestyle intervention administered to 1,079 participants, which included 45% racial and ethnic minorities and resulted in a 58% reduction in the incidence rate of diabetes (2). The two major goals of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention were a minimum of 7% weight loss/weight maintenance and a minimum of 150 min of physical activity similar in intensity to brisk walking. Both goals were hypothesized to be feasible, safe, and effective based on previous clinical trials in other countries (3–7). The methods used to achieve these lifestyle goals include the following key features: 1) individual case managers or “lifestyle coaches;” 2) frequent contact with participants; 3) a structured, state-of-the-art, 16-session core-curriculum that taught behavioral self-management strategies for weight loss and physical activity; 4) supervised physical activity sessions; 5) a more flexible maintenance intervention, combining group and individual approaches, motivational campaigns, and “restarts;” 6) individualization through a “toolbox” of adherence strategies; 7) tailoring of materials and strategies to address ethnic diversity; and finally 8) an extensive network of training, feedback, and clinical support. RATIONALE FOR DPP LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION At the time the DPP was being designed, evidence from a number of observational studies and three intervention studies (3–5) suggested that lifestyle intervention might reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Although none of the three intervention studies was a randomized controlled trial, they all suggested that modest changes in lifestyle could lower the risk of diabetes. In the Malmo study (3), parti Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Type 2 diabetes prevention tips and facts While genetics plays an important role in the development of diabetes, an individual still has the ability to influence their health to prevent type 2 diabetes. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This article focuses on ways to control risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People should watch their weight and exercise on a regular basis to help reverse prediabetes, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diet is important because it helps with weight loss. Some foods such as nuts in small amounts provide health benefits in blood sugar regulation. There is no single recommended diabetes prevention diet, but following a sound nutrition plan and maintaining a healthy weight are important steps in preventing the disease. Exercise is even more beneficial with weight loss in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Smoking is harmful in many ways including increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are medications available that have been shown in large trials to delay or prevent the onset of overt diabetes. Metformin (Glucophage) is recommended by the American Diabetes Association for prevention of diabetes in high-risk people. The coming years will be very exciting regarding the advances in the field of prevention of diabetes. However, the cornerstone of therapy will likely remain a healthy lifestyle. There are two major forms of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. This article focuses specifically on the prevention of type 2 diabetes since there is no know way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This form of diabetes is virtually a pandemic in the United States. This information reviews the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes and reviews key points regardi Continue reading >>

The Y : Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

The Y : Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

More than 200 Ys across the country help thousands of people reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes with YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program. This small-group program helps people with prediabetes eat healthier, increase their physical activityand lose weight, which can delay or even prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic disease that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people. A condition calledprediabetesoccurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. More than 86 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes has no cure, but prediabetes can be reversed. Chances are you know at least one person with diabetes and probably more than one with prediabetes. To find out if you are at risk, take this quick test . Then share the test with friends and family. If you find out you or someone you know is at risk for developing diabetes, the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can help. Find out if a Y near you runs the program . Continue reading >>

Ymca Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymca Diabetes Prevention Program

For more information about eligibility, program fees and registration, please contact Linda McVey at 216-509-3480 or [email protected] Diabetes is a serious health condition that can lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, high blood pressure, and blindness. Prediabetes is a potentially reversible condition that often leads to diabetes, and 79 million people in the United States are estimated to have it. If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, or believe you may be at risk for developing the disease, the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program can help you develop a healthier lifestyle and work with you to reduce the risks this condition can pose to your health. Based on effective efforts researched by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program will help you learn about and adopt the healthy eating and physical activity habits that have been proven to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Through the program you will receive support and encouragement from both a trained lifestyle coach and fellow classmates as you develop a plan for improving and maintaining your overall well-being. About the Program: As a leading nonprofit for strengthening community through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility, the Y believes that all people should be able to live life to its fullest, healthiest potential. In the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program a trained lifestyle coach will introduce topics in a small classroom setting and encourage participants as they explore how healthy eating, physical activity and behavior changes can benefit their health. How It Works: The 12-month group-based program consists of 16 core sessions (one hour a week for 16 week Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

Prediabeteshappens when a person's blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Without lifestyle changes most people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five to six years. Are 5 to 15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, Have a higher risk for heart disease and stroke. You are overweight or obese (BMI 25kg/m), You are inactive (do not get regular physical activity), You have a family history of diabetes (sibling, parent), You had gestational diabetes and/or delivered 9lb. baby, You are African American, Hispanic, Asian, Pacific Islander, or American Indian. If your score shows you are at high risk for prediabetes, talk to your health care provider and ask to be tested for prediabetes. Your health care provider may do a simple blood test to find out if you have prediabetes. THE NATIONAL DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU! The Centers for Disease Controls (CDC)National Diabetes Prevention Programis an evidence-based (proven to work based on research) lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes: TheDiabetes Prevention Programresearch study showed that making reasonable behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weightthat is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. It can help people cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. These lifestyle changes (healthy eating, increased physical activity) reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with prediabetes! People who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes work with a trained lifestyle coach in a group setting during the year-long program. Tennessee National Diabetes Prevention Programs Continue reading >>

Advocating For Diabetes Prevention

Advocating For Diabetes Prevention

The AMA’s Advocacy Work to Prevent Diabetes As part of the AMA's Improving Health Outcomes initiative, the AMA is committing its resources, expertise and reach to prevent type 2 diabetes and to improve outcomes for those suffering from this disease. This includes collaborations with the YMCA of the USA and the CDC to increase physician screening and testing of patients for prediabetes and referrals of at-risk patients to National Diabetes Prevention Programs (NDPPs). Key Legislation the AMA has Supported to Prevent Diabetes National Diabetes Clinical Care Commission Act (S.586): Introduced on Feb. 26, 2015, by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.). The legislation creates a commission that will focus on improving diabetes care delivery, patient outcomes and cost effectiveness. The AMA joined the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and other groups in supporting this legislation. A companion bill (H.R.1192) was introduced in the House by Rep. Pete Olson (R-TX) on March 2, 2015. Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act of 2015 (S. 1131/H.R. 2102): Introduced by Senator Al Franken (D-Minn.) and Rep. Susan Davis (D-Calif.) on April 29, 2015. This bipartisan bill provides coverage for the NDPP under the Medicare program. The NDPP at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a public-private partnership that provides low-cost, evidence-based community programs to prevent diabetes. Providing Medicare coverage for the NDPP helps seniors prevent diabetes and other chronic illnesses. The AMA joined the American Diabetes Association and others from the medical community in expressing its support for this legislation. Medicare takes steps toward authorizing coverage for NDPP: Announced by HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell in March 2016. This announcement stated that Medicare was Continue reading >>

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