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Diabetes Presentation Games

Genes | Free Full-text | Juvenile-onset Diabetes And Congenital Cataract: Double-gene Mutations Mimicking A Syndromic Diabetes Presentation

Genes | Free Full-text | Juvenile-onset Diabetes And Congenital Cataract: Double-gene Mutations Mimicking A Syndromic Diabetes Presentation

Genes 2017, 8(11), 309; doi: 10.3390/genes8110309 Juvenile-Onset Diabetes and Congenital Cataract: Double-Gene Mutations Mimicking a Syndromic Diabetes Presentation INSERM UMR-S 958, Facult de Mdecine Paris Diderot, University Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cit, Paris 75010, France Department of Ophthalmology, Htel Dieu Hospital, Beirut 166830, Lebanon Centre National de Recherche en Gnomique Humaine, Institut de Biologie Franois Jacob, Commissariat lEnergie Atomique, Evry 91057, France Hpital Femme-Mre-Enfant, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Universit Lyon 1, Bron cedex 69677, France School of Medicine, Lebanese American University, Beirut 1102 2801, Lebanon These authors contributed equally to this work. Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Received: 19 July 2017 / Revised: 24 October 2017 / Accepted: 24 October 2017 / Published: 7 November 2017 Monogenic forms of diabetes may account for 15% of all cases of diabetes, and may occur in the context of syndromic presentations. We investigated the case of a girl affected by insulin-dependent diabetes, diagnosed at 6 years old, associated with congenital cataract. Her consanguineous parents and her four other siblings did not have diabetes or cataract, suggesting a recessive syndrome. Using whole exome sequencing of the affected proband, we identified a heterozygous p.R825Q ABCC8 mutation, located at the exact same amino-acid position as the p.R825W recurring diabetes mutation, hence likely responsible for the diabetes condition, and a homozygous p.G71S mutation in CRYBB1, a gene known to be responsible for congenital cataract. Both mutations were predicted to be damaging and were absent or extremely rare in public databases. Unexpectedly, we found that the mother was als Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Constant Blood Glucose Check Can Be A Game Changer Isn

Diabetes: Constant Blood Glucose Check Can Be A Game Changer Isn

Nigerians with diabetes have been urged to frequently check their blood glucose level to enable them make informed choice as regard the management of their health. L-RMr. Ben Ofungwu, Managing Director, ISN Products Nigeria Ltd; Mr. Felix Ofungwu, Executive Director, Business Development; Mrs. Amaka Ezennia; Mr. Chinwuba Ezennin, Pipette Nigeria Ltd and winner ISN Best Customer Award; Mr. Nonso Offia, Marketing Manager during ISN Product Nig. Ltd Accu-Check Customers Appreciation forum in Lagos. Making this charge during Customer Appreciation Forum organised by ISN Products Nigeria Ltd, Executive Director for Business Development, Mr. Felix Ofungwu said that self monitoring enable patients to achieve blood glucose control and proper care of their diabetes. It also help to reduce the likelihood of developing long time complication which can be very life threatening and understand that every decision they made have direct effect on their blood glucose. The decision to use staircase instead of elevator, more vegetable than carbohydrate, take medication at the right time, decision to be happy. It also helps the doctor who is managing them to have information to take proper care of them to adjust on medication where it is necessary. He pointed out that people living with diabetes needs to own the disease and understand that the time they spend with the doctor in a year is lesser, they live with diabetes 365 days in a year and the moment by moment decision they take concern how to improve, how to manage diabetics they take it 365 days in a year but the time they spend with their doctor is less than 5 hours in a whole years. This makes it important for them to do self monitoring of their blood glucose regularly of which Accu-Chek blood glucose meters can help them achieve bet Continue reading >>

In The Spotlight: Talking To Your Child’s Class About Type 1

In The Spotlight: Talking To Your Child’s Class About Type 1

You know there’s a learning curve when it comes to type 1 diabetes. Now imagine being faced with a room full of new friends each September, none of whom has a clue what it is or what you’re doing with that poking device. Kids tend to find a way to explain diabetes to their classmates, but you can help them get the conversation started on the right foot. In fact, experts recommend speaking to your child’s class at the beginning of every school year to educate the students about type 1 and head off potential misunderstanding or even bullying. So what do you say to a room full of kids about diabetes? From games to books to talking points, here are some helpful tips for creating an engaging presentation. Why Talking About Type 1 Matters Your child’s teachers, the school nurse, and the principal are all aware of your son or daughter’s diabetes, so why does it matter that classmates learn about type 1? For one thing, because of the risk of high or low blood sugars, says Bethany King, L.I.S.W., a social worker and diabetes team member at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, “the more people who understand diabetes, the safer your child will be.” “Since diabetes is not a ‘visible’ disease,” adds Wynola Wayne, R.N., B.S.N., C.D.E., a diabetes nurse clinician and educator at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, “it’s important to share with classmates some of the signs of low blood sugar and when children should alert an adult to get help.” Facilitating an open discussion is also important for correcting misconceptions about diabetes, including fears related to the word “disease.” As Wayne points out, “It’s important to let children know that yes, diabetes is called a disease, but it’s not a disease that you catch, like a cold.” Continue reading >>

Jsg-digital Games For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: Underpinning Theory With Three Illustrative Examples | Kamel Boulos | Jmir Serious Games

Jsg-digital Games For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: Underpinning Theory With Three Illustrative Examples | Kamel Boulos | Jmir Serious Games

Digital Games for Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Underpinning Theory With Three Illustrative Examples 1The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health, Moray College UHI, University of the Highlands and Islands, Elgin, United Kingdom 2Ayogo Health Inc., Vancouver, BC, Canada 3Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Science, Division of Health Research, Centre for Health Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Inverness, United Kingdom 4Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal 5Health Promotion & Wellness, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY, United States Maged N Kamel Boulos, MBBCh, MSc (Dermatol), MSc (Med Inform), PhD, SMIEEE The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabeteschildren/adolescents and adultsfrom a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needschildren with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 an Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Gaming The System For Better Adherence

Gaming The System For Better Adherence

Evidence-Based Diabetes Management > May/June Published on: July 08, 2013 Medication nonadherence, including persistence with medical regimens, continues to vex the healthcare system. According to health policy experts, medication nonadherence not only drains the healthcare system of resources, but seriously hinders the effectiveness of important treatment innovations. A new approach to nonadherence management, however, could change this frustrating picture. Medicine doesnt matter, until it enters the body, stated Yelena Yankovskaya, PharmD. Yankovskaya, a fellow in managed markets at the Mayes College of Healthcare Business and Policy, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, points out that the careful, time-consuming, and ingenious innovations created by manufacturers and scientists and the programs created to ensure access to drugs are wasted if the patient doesnt take the drug. Nonadherence is pervasive and accounts for nearly $317 billion annually in healthcare costs. According to Yankovskaya, patients with diabetes are key contributors, representing onethird of this figure. Preventing nonadherence is an opportunity for great cost savings. In her presentation Emerging Solutions for Medication Nonadherence, she provided 3 reasons why patients do not take their medication: (1) behavioral factors (69%); (2) out-of-pocket costs (16%); and (3) clinical reasons, such as medication side effects (15%). Yankovskaya noted that the behavior component may be the most difficult to address, because Adherence can be a deep personal barrier. For instance, injecting oneself is an intense, physiologically abnormal experience. Some payers have tried to use predictive modeling to evaluate claims data and electronic health records to identify patients who may benefit from targeted b Continue reading >>

Gamesfornutrition - Diabetes Education Games

Gamesfornutrition - Diabetes Education Games

Diabetes involves many facets of care and can be overwhelming to clients. Using games to reinforce concepts and provide repetition of information can be valuable and enhance learning. Feedback: We value your feedback. Please share any comments or suggestions you have after playing these games. The Balloon Challenge was originally a way of illustrating the importance of working together, especially in complex situations, during training activities. Starting with a group of 10 to 20 people, have them form a circle facing each other. It is often not a bad idea to have them all hold hands together and then let go while taking a small step backwards. Then from outside of the circle, begin to slowly toss one balloon at a time into the center of the circle, while challenging them to collectively keep the balloon(s) afloat (i.e. no balloons are to touch the floor). As you toss in each balloon, explain to them that every balloon represents a challenge, or complication, that someone would face in a given situation. Progressively, keep adding more challenges and complications for the same situation as you add a balloon representing each. Eventually, your group will reach a point where they can no longer keep the balloons off the ground. At this point stop the balloon toss. Have each member grab hold of a single balloon (some participants may not have a balloon yet). Then explain carefully that in dealing with complex conditions and situations it is nearly impossible to go it alone, and that it is important to work together with all the people and services that are there to support you. Much like it is nearly impossible to juggle that many balloons at once. However, once you begin to take the time to pass balloons to each other cooperatively, one at a time, a difficult task can be Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

Managing diabetes is a daily challenge. There are so many variables to keep in mind -- food, exercise, stress, general health, etc. -- that keeping blood sugar levels in the desired range is a constant balancing act. We want to make managing diabetes easier. So, the DRI's Education Team hasdeveloped short brochures about the topics listed below -- offering useful tips on many of the day-to-day issues facing people living with diabetes. And, most of the materials are offered in English and Spanish. If you can benefit by learning about one or more of these subjects, just click on the title to expand. Do you know what foods have the greatest impact on your blood sugars? If you answered CARBOHYDRATE FOODS...youre right! Carbohydrates -- "carbs" -- are broken down into glucose. So if you eat too much of them, your blood sugar level may rise. For this reason, people with diabetes find it helpful to keep track of the carbs they eat in order to manage their blood sugars. Carb counting is easy. It just takes some practice at first. Caring for older people with diabetes requires special thought and consideration. The older individual is more likely to have other health problems and may be taking a variety of different medications. Many people are frightened to check their blood sugar -- or "blood glucose" -- levels because they do not want to see levels that are higher or lower than their target range. But, checking blood sugar at home, in school, and in the workplace is key to managing diabetes. It puts you in control of your diabetes. Remember, your blood sugar levels remain the same whether you know about them or not. Checking blood sugar levels is the most accurate way to see if your lifestyle changes and medications are helping you to better manage your diabetes. If levels Continue reading >>

Most Creative Design Winner: A Virtual World For Diabetic Kids

Most Creative Design Winner: A Virtual World For Diabetic Kids

Most Creative Design Winner: A Virtual World for Diabetic Kids Most Creative Design Winner: A Virtual World for Diabetic Kids Email addresses will not be shared with 3rd parties. See privacy policy We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. This year, the "Most Creative Idea" category winner in the DiabetesMine Design Challenge was determined solely by community voting. And here's what you guys picked: a program presenting a "virtual world" for kids with diabetes, in which they have to help take of little Sue Lin, all the while learning how to better manage their own diabetes In Sue Lin's World was created by a team of people at at small-ish web design company called Oak Grove Technologies out of Alexandria, VA (company headquarters is in Raleigh, NC). Susan Stiles, who made the contest submission, is an IT consultant and acting VP of Marketing for the firm, which primarily develops eLearning programs for established clients including the Federal Government and the Mayo Clinic. The Sue Lin program is their first attempt at a platform for health/disease management. Here's what Susan had to say about the winning project: DM) First off, Susan, can you give us the 30-second rundown on Oak Grove Technologies? SS) We're an IT consulting company with close to 200 employees total, 15 in our multimedia division. We do website design, web portal development and video work a lot of things for the government. For example, for the Department of Veterans Affairs, we designed Clinician-Patient Communication learning programs for healthcare professionals. We also do Workforce Succession Planning for HR professionals they're all online courses for professional accreditation. We Continue reading >>

Could This Be The End Of Daily Injections For People With Type 1 Diabetes? 'game-changing' Treatment Restores Production Of Insulin

Could This Be The End Of Daily Injections For People With Type 1 Diabetes? 'game-changing' Treatment Restores Production Of Insulin

Millions of people with Type 1 diabetes may be freed from injecting themselves with insulin every day after a breakthrough discovery. Scientists have found that injecting billions of immune cells into the body restores the production of the hormone, which breaks down sugar in the blood. Experts said the treatment, which lasted for a year, could be a ‘game-changer’ for people with the disease. Diabetes is a life-long health condition where there is too much glucose in the blood because the body cannot use it properly. Insulin is the hormone secreted by cells in the pancreas which breaks down sugar in the blood. Healthy people have millions of ‘T-reg’ cells which stop the body’s immune system attacking these insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. However, people with Type 1 diabetes do not have enough T-reg cells to protect the pancreas, and so it is attacked and stops making enough insulin. Everyone diagnosed with Type 1 is treated with insulin, and the majority inject themselves with insulin multiple times daily. Now, Californian researchers have found that T-reg cells can be removed from the body and increased by 1,500 times in a laboratory, the Telegraph reports. Then, they can be put back into the bloodstream and will function normally to protect the insulin-producing cells. A trial of 14 people found the treatment is safe - and lasts up to 12 months. The people in the study were aged between 18 and 43 and had recently been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Doctors removed around two cups of blood containing two to four million T-reg cells. These were separated from other cells and allowed to replicate in a laboratory, before being infused back into the blood. A quarter were found to be there after 12 months, and they were able to protect the pancreas so it Continue reading >>

Digital Games For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: Underpinning Theory With Three Illustrative Examples

Digital Games For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: Underpinning Theory With Three Illustrative Examples

The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health, Moray College UHI, University of the Highlands and Islands, Elgin, United Kingdom Department of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Science, Division of Health Research, Centre for Health Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Faculdade de Psicologia, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal Health Promotion & Wellness, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY, United States Maged N Kamel Boulos, MBBCh, MSc (Dermatol), MSc (Med Inform), PhD, SMIEEE The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health Digital games are an important class of eHealth interventions in diabetes, made possible by the Internet and a good range of affordable mobile devices (eg, mobile phones and tablets) available to consumers these days. Gamifying disease management can help children, adolescents, and adults with diabetes to better cope with their lifelong condition. Gamification and social in-game components are used to motivate players/patients and positively change their behavior and lifestyle. In this paper, we start by presenting the main challenges facing people with diabeteschildren/adolescents and adultsfrom a clinical perspective, followed by three short illustrative examples of mobile and desktop game apps and platforms designed by Ayogo Health, Inc. (Vancouver, BC, Canada) for type 1 diabetes (one example) and type 2 diabetes (two examples). The games target different age groups with different needschildren with type 1 diabetes versus adults with type 2 diabetes. The paper is not meant to be an exhaustive review of all digital game offerings available for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but rather to serve as a taster of a few of the game genres on offer today for both types of diabetes, with a brief discussion of (1) some of the underp Continue reading >>

How To Teach ... Diabetes

How To Teach ... Diabetes

Do you know the difference between the two types of diabetes? Here’s a quick refresher: type 1 is where your body destroys the cells that make insulin, which means that your glucose levels increase, potentially damaging your organs. It can develop at any time, but is often discovered in childhood and requires daily doses of insulin. Type 2, on the other hand, means that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or doesn’t react to it. Symptoms can be controlled with diet, exercise and monitoring blood glucose levels. It is linked to obesity and usually develops in later life; it also accounts for 90% of all UK cases. The disease is at once complex, common (it affects 4 million people in the UK) and scary – prevalence rates are rising and about half of cases are thought to be undiagnosed. So how can you discuss it with your students? Primary This video, from Diabetes UK, uses simple, child-friendly language to explain what type 1 diabetes is and how it affects the body. An extreme zoom takes viewers inside a person with diabetes: there we meet talking cells and flying insulin and glucose, detailing how treatment works and how to handle a diagnosis. The charity has a huge number of resources aimed at children who have diabetes, including guidance sheets about exploring the outdoors safely and taking care in cold weather. Advice includes wearing a diabetes wristband in case of an emergency and keeping a testing kit and snacks to hand. The idea of testing blood and injecting insulin can be intimidating. Give your students a look at a day in the life of a diabetic with this pack from the International Diabetes Federation. It uses a cartoon strip to demystify the process of checking blood sugar levels, as well as offering advice on how to keep active and eat healthily Continue reading >>

Games And Diabetes

Games And Diabetes

1City for Scientific Research and Technological Applications (SRTA-City), Alexandria, Egypt 2Open Lab, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 2Open Lab, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 3Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 1City for Scientific Research and Technological Applications (SRTA-City), Alexandria, Egypt 2Open Lab, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 3Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 4London Knowledge Lab, UCL Institute of Education, University College London, London, UK Shaimaa Lazem, PhD, Newcastle University, 89 Sandyford Rd, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8HW, UK. Email: [email protected] Copyright 2015 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Here we review 18 articles that describe the design and evaluation of 1 or more games for diabetes from technical, methodological, and theoretical perspectives. We undertook searches covering the period 2010 to May 2015 in the ACM, IEEE, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, and Google Scholar online databases using the keywords children, computer games, diabetes, games, type 1, and type 2 in various Boolean combinations. The review sets out to establish, for future research, an understanding of the current landscape of digital games designed for children with diabetes. We briefly explored the use and impact of well-established learning theories in such games. The most frequently mentioned theoretical frameworks were social cognitive theory and social constructivism. Due to the limitations of the reported evaluation methodologies, littl Continue reading >>

About Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes,

About Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes,

The following pages teach research, advocacy, and the importance of health and physical activity. This curriculum may be reproduced and distributed to students. These materials are reproducible. For more information, fundraising tips, and classroom tools, please visit kidswalk.jdrf.org JDRF KiDs WalK to CuRe Diabetes Classroom ToolkiT JDRF KiDs WalK to CuRe Diabetes | Classroom ToolkiT 2 Classroom ToolkiT 2 Classroom Curriculum overview 3 Diabetes Basics 4 lesson 1 What is Diabetes? 6 activity 1 Diabetes—so many Questions 7 activity 2 Fill-in-the-Blank mystery 8 activity 3 Topsy Turvy: Where Does the Food Go? 9 activity 4 The Truth about Type 1 Diabetes 10 lesson 2 The search for a Cure 11 activity 1 role Play: researchers Wanted 12 activity 2 research maze 13 lesson 3 You Can make a Difference! 14 activity 1 Be a Friend 15 activity 2 Be an advocate 16 activity 3 What Would You Do? 17 lesson 4 You are What You Eat 18 activity 1 Fruit and Vegetable survey 19 activity 2 see more, Eat more! 20 lesson 5 Get moving! 21 activity 1 activity list 22 activity 2 activity Journal 23 rEsourCEs 24 ansWEr kEY 25 HoW To usE THE Classroom ToolkiT The Classroom Toolkit is designed for you to use in conjunction with the JDrF kids Walk to Cure Diabetes. The materials contained in the Classroom Toolkit are designed to assist teachers in explaining the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the need for proper nutrition and physical activity, and the need to cure, treat, and prevent type 1 diabetes (T1D). JDrF encourages teachers to reproduce all materials for use in their classrooms. The activities in the kids Walk curriculum are targeted to students in grades k–5. some worksheets are geared toward elementary school–age students, while others are more appropri Continue reading >>

Nursing Games

Nursing Games

Here are 156 free nursing games with some 6,000 questions designed to make your nurse learning / education more interesting, engaging and fun! In this section we have developed, and are experimenting with, different kinds of educational nursing games. Online games are very popular, so why not apply them to your nursing education? The Super Nurse and Word Guess games have been developed in HTML5. Therefore, the latest browser versions of Internet Explorer (IE10/11), Firefox, Chrome or Safari need to be used. These games can also be played on most mobile devices. We have enhanced the games software to produce a Report that you can print out and keep for your records, or to hand in for assignments. For statistical and research purposes, the game results are now being tracked and recorded. Click on a Title below to open up a specific nursing educational game in a new window. If you find the audio annoying or distracting, click the Mute button on your computer. Enjoy! 1.1 Abdominal Pain Use this game to test and review your knowledge of common causes of abdominal pain. (This is a HTML5 game where 15 items are randomly selected from a pool of 45 questions; so each time the game will be different). 1.2 Anatomy & Physiology I Test and refresh your general knowledge of the basic components of human anatomy and physiology. (15 items selected randomly from 45 questions). 1.3 Anatomy & Physiology II More questions to test your general knowledge about human anatomy and physiology. (15 items selected from 45 questions). 1.4 Back Pain Test and refresh your knowledge of the most common causes of acute lower back pain. (15 items selected from 40 questions). 1.5 Bacteria Test and refresh your knowledge of the most common bacteria and the infections they cause. (15 items selected from 50 Continue reading >>

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