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Diabetes Portion Control Plate

Diabetes Portion Control Plates Now Available

Diabetes Portion Control Plates Now Available

Diabetes Portion Control Plates Now Available Posted by ADW Diabetes | Dec 23, 2009 | New Products | 0 | Eating right is a big part of managing your diabetes, but there is no doubt that this can be challenging in our modern, supersized world of food portions. Its easy to forget the proper amounts of food and correct balance of the food groups, and this can wreak havoc on your glucose levels as well as your waistline. ADW Diabetes is now carrying a new item that will help you make the right food choices the Diabetes Portion Plate . This colorful, sturdy plate has all the right information about staying on track with food portions and is specially made with the diabetic diet in mind. With the Diabetes Portion Plate, you can find the right balance between non-starchy vegetables, protein and starches for each meal, and the right amounts for each group too. For more information on eating the right way on a diabetic diet, check out our free diabetes information site, Destination Diabetes! Find detailed information on some of the following topics: Continue reading >>

Amazon.com: Diabetic Portion Plate: Health & Personal Care

Amazon.com: Diabetic Portion Plate: Health & Personal Care

Find answers in product info, Q&As, reviews Please make sure that you are posting in the form of a question. There was a problem completing your request. Please try your search again later. All Product Information Customer Q&A's Customer Reviews The new Adult Diabetes Portion Plate has a new simple design with pictures of delicious food in the best portion sizes to help meet the sensitive dietary needs of individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetes. Product details: 100% melamine, 9 1/2 in diameter, dishwasher safe. Product Dimensions: 11 x 11 x 3 inches ; 5 ounces Continue reading >>

Portion Control Plates

Portion Control Plates

By Annette McDermott Certified in Food, Nutrition and Health Many experts believe that portion control (and, by effect, calorie control) is vital to healthy weight loss. Portion control plates help take the guesswork out of food portions and help you eat balanced meals. In an increasingly obese society, the availability of portion control plates is on the rise. Here are just a few of the plates currently on the market. The Portion Plate's portion control plates and utensils are the perfect tools in determining portions based on the recommended serving size set by the USDA. Each plate section is divided by beautiful hand created artwork, which transforms them into much more than a portion plate used for dietary purposes only. Use the artwork as a guideline to determine portion sizes. Portion Plates are confidence boosters to anyone on a weight program as well as a great teaching tool for kids. Selections include options for the entire family. There are also plates for diabetics and plates written in Spanish. Single Portion Plates cost $11.95 plus shipping. Kits which include an educational placemat and brochure are also available for $16.95 plus shipping. The Balance Plate was created to support a healthy, holistic lifestyle. Each plate offers vibrant, fun designs to help you manage your portions and stay motivated. Designs include plates for adults, kids (featuring an eye-catching rainbow theme) and a unique yin and yang plate to encourage balanced living. All Balance Plates are 100% melamine and dishwasher safe. They are based on current USDA food guidelines. Plates range in cost from $16.99 - $19.99 plus shipping. The Diet Plate is a UK-based company offering attractive, decorative portion control plates. The earthenware plates are decorated with motivational sayings Continue reading >>

6 Portion Control Tips For Diabetes

6 Portion Control Tips For Diabetes

When it comes to food portions, size matters — especially if you have type 2 diabetes. Portion control is essential to manage both blood sugar and weight, says Vandana Sheth, RD, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). Controlling portion sizes can be simple and practical, Sheth says, and it can help you control your intake of calories and carbohydrates. This can help you manage your blood sugar and maintain a healthy weight, which can potentially reduce your need for type 2 diabetes medications. Weight loss plans, oral medications, and short-acting insulin for people with type 2 diabetes are generally calculated based on an expected calorie and carbohydrate count for each meal, says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, a national media spokesperson for the AND. So practicing proper portion control is also essential for managing type 2 diabetes effectively. Planning Out Food Portions Use these practical portion guidelines for common foods to help you stay in the right range: A serving of meat should be about 3 ounces, roughly the size of a deck of playing cards. Cheese should be in 1-ounce servings, roughly the size of about six dice A serving of cooked whole grain pasta or brown rice should be about 1/2 cup, roughly the size of a tennis ball A serving of whole fruit is about the size of a tennis ball A serving of raw leafy greens is about 1 cup, which would fit into both hands cupped together; a serving of cooked greens is 1/2 cup, which would fit into one cupped hand Mastering Portion Control Using portion-control plates or pre-portioned foods and filling up on low-energy-dense foods — those high in nutrients and low in calories — can all help manage portions and promote weight loss, according to a review of research published in July 2014 in the Continue reading >>

Portion Distortion? Lets Talk Portion Size For Diabetes

Portion Distortion? Lets Talk Portion Size For Diabetes

Estimates show that portion sizes have more than quadrupled in the past 50 years. And all this, while we have become a generally more sedentary society. If you want to check out a fun activity, here are some slides showing the increase in portion size along with the large number of calories needed to be burned to burn the difference. carbohydrates, but you will clearly notice that out of all of our common poor food choices, we have increased our intake of One example is that the difference in a portion of pasta has increased by 525 calories (over 100 grams carbs)and that will take an extra 2 hours of house cleaning to burn off not the whole plate of pasta, just the extra!!! Why is this? Generally speaking, the food industry figured out how to produce an abundance of edibles very cheaply.and weve completely bought into it. Notice I didnt say theyve discovered to produce an abundance of food (defined as: a nutritive substance that people or animals eat or drink to maintain life and growth), but edibles (things that can be consumed). What Im referring to are items such as: french fries, chips, snack cakes, sodas etc. These are foods that nourish the body minimally, if at all. But what they do in a BIG way is, add excessive amounts of calories, carbs and sugar that results in weight gain, metabolic syndrome and chronic health problems. Additionally, they arent truly satisfying. Think about itwhen was the last time, you had a couple of french fries and were content? Most of the time, these items simply whet the appetite for more and you find yourself craving them again and again! Growing up, I remember the Pringles slogan Once you pop, you cant stop! As I reflect later, it amazes me that a company can BRAG about how addictive they intentionally make their products, and we l Continue reading >>

23 Easy Plate Method Dinners

23 Easy Plate Method Dinners

Use the plate method formula for simple and delicious meal planning. Start with a 9-inch-diameter plate and fill the sections accordingly. Include a side of fruit and/or a serving of low-fat dairy as your calorie and carb budgets allow. Dinner has never been so easy! Use the plate method formula for simple and delicious meal planning. Start with a 9-inch-diameter plate and fill the sections accordingly. Include a side of fruit and/or a serving of low-fat dairy as your calorie and carb budgets allow. Dinner has never been so easy! Use the plate method formula for simple and delicious meal planning. Start with a 9-inch-diameter plate and fill the sections accordingly. Include a side of fruit and/or a serving of low-fat dairy as your calorie and carb budgets allow. Dinner has never been so easy! Use the plate method formula for simple and delicious meal planning. Start with a 9-inch-diameter plate and fill the sections accordingly. Include a side of fruit and/or a serving of low-fat dairy as your calorie and carb budgets allow. Dinner has never been so easy! Continue reading >>

What Is The Plate Method?

What Is The Plate Method?

The Diabetes Plate Method is an easy "formula" that helps you eat right with every bite Recipe by Ronaldo Linares; plate photography by Rene Comet Wondering what to eat for your best diabetes health? For American Diabetes Month, here's a great way to eat right with every bite. The Diabetes Plate Method is a simple guide for planning meals. The result is tasty meals that are good for you, boost energy, and keep you feeling satisfied. Using the "formula" encourages you to eat more healthy food and fewer unhealthy foods. The Diabetes Plate Method helps you control portion sizes of starchy, carbohydrate-containing foods that have the most impact on blood glucose levels. It focuses on eating more nonstarchy vegetables, which are low in carbohydrate and calories and high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber. It also helps you get enough lean protein. You can use the plate method for your specific health and nutrition goals including weight loss or maintenance, blood glucose management, and simple good nutrition. The plate method is also a useful meal planning tool for people with prediabetes and for those who simply want a healthy approach to eating. Start today by filling half your plate with nonstarchy vegetables. Then fill one quarter of your plate with whole grain or starchy foods and the remaining quarter with lean protein foods. The Diabetes Plate Method includes fruit and low-fat dairy on the side, as your meal plan and calorie needs allow. Healthful fats, which can be used in any section of the plate for food preparation or as condiments, are also key ingredients. The best part about the Diabetes Plate Method? It doesn't require a lot of math and you can use it almost anywhere. Use it when you eat out, at holidays or special events, and most importantwhen you prepare foo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Planning: The Plate Method

Diabetes Meal Planning: The Plate Method

Over the many years in which I’ve been a dietitian, I’ve been asked numerous times, “What should I eat?” In some ways, this is an easy question to answer, but in other ways, it can be complex. People who have had diabetes for many years may remember the days of rather strict, calculated diets. Foods were carefully weighed and measured and people used food lists, which didn’t always offer a whole lot of variety. Times have changed in that there are many different meal-planning approaches for people who have diabetes. No one approach fits all; as I’ve mentioned many times, there is no “diabetic diet.” Fortunately, too, we have scientific evidence to back this up: Newer nutrition recommendations for diabetes confirm that many different types of “eating patterns” can help people effectively manage their conditions while preventing or delaying the complications of diabetes. The Plate Method If you read last week’s posting about exchanges and are thinking that it’s not for you, you might be interested in using the plate method. The plate method is an easy yet effective tool that many people who are “new” to diabetes use to get started with meal planning. My Plate No doubt you’ve seen the USDA’s version of the plate method called “MyPlate.” Several years ago, the Food Pyramid was scratched in favor of a plate. MyPlate divides the plate into four somewhat unequal sections. Each section represents a food group: fruits, vegetables, grains, and protein. Off to the side is the dairy group. The USDA states that these five food groups are the basis for a healthful diet. The website for MyPlate, which is www.choosemyplate.gov, is interactive and provides a number of tools for men, women, pregnant women, older adults, and children to learn about nutr Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Portion Sizes

Diabetes: Portion Sizes

Choosing healthy foods is an important step toward controlling diabetes. But healthy portions are important, too. Even the most nutritious, diabetes-friendly foods can cause trouble if you eat too much. Overeating can make both your blood sugar and your weight harder to manage. And if you're using food exchange lists to plan your meals, it's important to keep portion sizes in mind. In fact, many of us don't know how much food we should put on our plate at each meal. In these days of super-size portions at restaurants, movie theaters, and frozen food aisles, it's easy to lose perspective. What does a healthy portion actually look like? One way to find out is to buy a portion control plate that has different sections for different parts of the meal. If the food fits on the plate, your portion sizes are probably in the ballpark. You can also just use smaller plates and avoid having seconds. If you want a second helping, go for a walk around the block. By the time you get back, you won't be as hungry as you thought you were. A study of 130 obese people with diabetes found that using a portion control plate every day for six months improved weight loss. Specifically, many of the patients who used the plates lost about 5 percent of their weight, while most patients in the control group, who received only standard advice about portion control, didn't lose much weight at all. Patients using the plates were also able to cut back on diabetes medications without sacrificing control of their blood sugar. Even without a special plate, you can learn to eyeball healthy serving sizes. A single serving of meat -- about 3 ounces -- is the size of a deck of cards. A one-ounce serving of cheese is the size of four dice. A four-ounce bagel is the size of a hockey puck. A one-cup serving of Continue reading >>

Portion-control Tableware Helps Obese Diabetics Lose Weight

Portion-control Tableware Helps Obese Diabetics Lose Weight

Portion-Control Tableware Helps Obese Diabetics Lose Weight by Judith Groch Judith Groch, Senior Writer, MedPage Today Explain to interested patients, that a major effect of portion-control plates is to cut down on total calories, the main component of a weight-loss program. CALGARY, Alberta, June 25 -- A plate and a cereal bowl marked for a portion size designed to limit calorie intake helped obese diabetic patients know when enough is enough, researchers reported. After six months, patients with type 2 diabetes who used the tableware were more than 3.5 times as likely to have lost at least five pounds as were patients given usual care, Sue D. Pedersen, M.D., of the University of Calgary, and colleagues, reported in the June 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. In addition, the patients using portion control were able to safely decrease their glycemic-control medications, the researchers reported. The number of calories ingested by patients at a meal has been directly correlated with the serving size, Dr. Pedersen said. However, the researchers knew of no published clinical trial that has examined the efficacy of using portion-control tableware to induce weight loss and improve glycemic control. The portion-control dishes included a calibrated dinner plate that was sex specific and a breakfast bowl, which was not. The man's plate was calibrated for an approximately 800-calorie meal; the woman's plate provided a 650-calorie meal. The cereal bowl allowed for a 200-calorie meal of cereal and milk. To facilitate portion control, the plate is divided into sections designed to contain predetermined volumes of carbohydrates, proteins, cheese, and sauces, with the remainder of the center of the plate open for vegetables. For mixed meals that could not be readily div Continue reading >>

The Plate Method For Weight Management

The Plate Method For Weight Management

A simple and easy way to manage your energy intake The plate method is a technique of dividing up your plate to enable you to measure out appropriate portion sizes of different foods. The plate method can be used to aid weight management and can also be helpful for people with diabetes in managing carbohydrate intake . The plate method is simple to apply and is therefore an easy way to manage your energy intake and ensure a healthy balance of nutrients in your diet. For the plate method to work well, it helps to begin with a suitably sized plate. Many dinner plates in the UK are up to 12 inches in diameter. Replacing a larger plate with one that has a 10 inch diameter can you help to reduce your meal size by up to a quarter. The American Diabetes Association recommends, at main meals, dividing your plate into quarters as follows: 2 quarters made up of non-starchy vegetables Non-starchy vegetables include vegetables that have less impact on blood sugar levels, such as broccoli, mushrooms, swede and most salad vegetables. Starchy foods include whole grain foods , such as bread and rice, and starchy vegetables include vegetables such as potatoes, cassava and beetroot. Protein based foods may include any of the following: Continue reading >>

Diabetes Portion Control | Apidra (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Diabetes Portion Control | Apidra (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

insulin glulisine [rDNA origin] injection Apidra insulin glulisine [rDNA origin] injection $10* COPAY FOR LANTUS FOR 12 MONTHS. Certain restrictions apply. Start saving & enroll now >> $10* COPAY FOR TOUJEO (insulin glargine injection 300 Units/mL) FOR 12 MONTHS. Certain restrictions apply. Start saving & enroll now >> One card. Savings for up to 12 diabetes medication fills. Certain restrictions apply. Start saving & enroll now >> Help your patients save on Apidra through our Mealtime Masters Program! Learn more >> Join a free webinar to learn about using Apidra (insulin glulisine [rDNA origin] injection) and making healthy choices with the Apidra COACH program. See Program Benefits >> Get tools and support for using Apidra (insulin glulisine [rDNA origin] injection) and making healthy mealtime choices when you join the free Apidra COACH program. See what youll receive >> It's not just what you eat, it's how much. Practicing portion control is a key strategy to better managing your diabetes. And though the serving sizes may be smaller than you're used to, choosing the right food will leave you feeling just as full. The truth is, when you eat the wrong food or eat too much, your blood sugar can spike. And if you don't eat enough, it'll fall below the ADA recommended range. The only way to determine if you're eating the right amount is to carefully measure. Try not to get in the habit of "eyeballing" your portions. Different foods have different portions, and you can't be consistent without measuring. Bread servings are based on a single 1-ounce slice. Check the weight of bagels and rolls. If it weighs an ounce, great. If not, cut it in half or go with a whole-wheat option. A serving of meat is about the size of a deck of cards. A serving of pasta is about the size of a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Using A Plate Format To Plan Meals

Diabetes: Using A Plate Format To Plan Meals

Diabetes: Using a Plate Format to Plan Meals A plate format can be used to help you manage how you eat. It helps you see how much space each food should take on a plate. Using a plate format will help you spread carbohydrate throughout the day, which will help keep your blood sugar level from going way up and way down. A plate format is an easy and simple way to plan meals. It can be used along with other meal-planning methods. A plate format is so simple that you can start using it right away. It lets you see how much space each food should take up Post a copy of a sample plate format on your refrigerator. Refer to it until you know how much space different foods should take up on your plate. Make sure that you are using a 9-inch plate. Picture the food on your plate. Learn how much space each food needs on your plate, and try to picture that amount when you are in different situations, such as eating out or attending an event. Practice. Use a copy of the sample plate format to plan a day's meals and snacks. If you need help, talk with your certified diabetes educator or a registered dietitian. Keep a record. Use a plate format for a week, and keep track of your meals and snacks. You can make copies of the sample for each day. If you have questions about using a plate format, talk with your diabetes educator or registered dietitian. If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar before and 1 to 2 hours after you eat. Then write the results on your food record. Doing this will help you see how foods affect your body. Use a plate that measures 9 inches across. Draw an imaginary line through the center of your plate, and then divide one of the halves into quarters. You can use your hand to judge portion sizes. Follow these guidelines for lunch and dinner: One-fourth is lea Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

The Size Of The Plate Matters | Diabetic Connect

The Size Of The Plate Matters | Diabetic Connect

How to Make the "Small Plate Movement" Work for You Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connects weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. Since the late 1970s, portion control has become a heated issue. In fact, the surface area of the average dinner plate has increased 36 percent since 1960, according to research by Brian Wansink, PhD, and Koert Van Ittersum, PhD . They suggest the problems with portion control are due to three things: large packages, large restaurant servings, and large dinnerware. The fact of the matter is, you will eat 22 percent less simply by switching from a 12-inch plate to a 10-inch plate. These researchers believe that education alone cannot solve these issues and suggest that success can be found through the elimination of large packages (goodbye Costco), large serving sizes, and oversized dishes. Research shows that its easier to change things in ones living environment rather than suggesting people should simply "look at things differently." Mindful eating can be much easier, they suggest, by eliminating the hidden, subliminal persuaders. This video shows a helpful approach to changing our oversized dishes to smaller ones for better portion control. If youve ever traveled to Europe, youre probably aware of the high standards many Europeans hold when it comes to eating and drinking from real cups, plates, and silverware. From restaurants in train stations to coffee served at the zoo, its a pleasant and sophisticated experience to enjoy your meal on the real deal. Unfortunately, we fail to uphold these standards in the U.S. where we dont bat an eye at anything disposable. No Continue reading >>

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