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Price Controls On Diabetes Drugs, Licenses For Sales Reps Key Features Of Pharmaceutical Bill

Price Controls On Diabetes Drugs, Licenses For Sales Reps Key Features Of Pharmaceutical Bill

Price controls on diabetes medication. Requiring pharmaceutical sales representatives to be licensed and annually report to the state on their activities. Mandating disclosure of any pharmaceutical-related contributions by nonprofits working in the health care sector. These are just some of the changes proposed by Democratic Sen. Yvanna Cancela in an omnibus pharmaceutical bill introduced on Tuesday — changes she says are necessary in order to ensure patients have access to life-saving drugs and to bolster health care industry transparency. But pharmaceutical company lobbyists are already digging in their heels and saying it will reduce patients’ access to life-saving medicine and ignores the importance of private market competition. A substantial portion of the bill, SB265, seeks to improve access to medically necessary diabetes drugs by implementing price controls, which pharmaceutical companies have long resisted. The legislation, which eight of Cancela’s Democratic colleagues have signed onto, would require the state Department of Health and Human Services to compile a list of “essential” drugs that treat diabetes, such as insulin and biguanides, and require drug manufacturers to reimburse purchasers — either the patient or the insurance company — when the manufacturer’s list price of the drug exceeds the highest price paid for the drug in certain countries or if it exceeds annual changes in the Consumer Price Index. The goal, in Cancela’s view, is essentially to stabilize the cost of a drugs such as insulin that have existed for 95 years and yet have seen prices increase 450 percent above inflation. She said the idea came last fall after she attended a meeting of about 100 people put together by the progressive think tank Center for American Progr Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Drugs By 2016 Sales

Top 10 Diabetes Drugs By 2016 Sales

To say there’s a lot going on in the U.S. diabetes space right now would be an understatement. The formulary exclusions and payer pressure that have taken a toll on so many medications are continuing in full force, and thanks to new and forthcoming biosimilars, that likely won’t change anytime soon. Value-based pricing has arrived on the diabetes scene, too, shaking payer relationships up even further. And price hikes, which some drugmakers have relied on for their long off-patent drugs, are no longer OK as far as the public and many lawmakers are concerned. All three of the diabetes giants—Novo Nordisk, Sanofi and Eli Lilly—have taken steps to allay the price-increase controversy, with Novo and Sanofi each pledging caps on their hikes, but all three are facing legal difficulties for their historical insulin pricing, too. Then there’s the cardiovascular outcomes data that’s taken the arena by storm. These days, it’s no longer enough to show that your diabetes fighter doesn’t increase heart risks; to compete at the top of its game, a drug has to show it can pare down cardiovascular risks—or face potential upstaging by a rival that can. And while diabetes is growing in prevalence, it’s still unclear just how well newer classes such as SGLT2 can keep up their growth acts. With all of those factors in mind, it’ll be no surprise if 2016’s list of top 10 U.S. diabetes sellers sees something of a shake-up in the near future—and in fact, it’ll be pretty surprising if it doesn’t. But nevertheless, we’ve compiled last year’s sales rankings for you based on data from Evaluate Pharma, along with some insight into what to expect for each of the top medications going forward. We focused on U.S. sales, because that’s where diabetes drugmakers are fe Continue reading >>

Today Is The Day

Today Is The Day

Do not share your Levemir® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Never inject Levemir® into a vein or muscle. Do not share your Levemir FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. Before taking Levemir®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should ch Continue reading >>

Novo Nordisk Takes Aim At Eli Lilly With U.s. Backing Of New Diabetes Drug

Novo Nordisk Takes Aim At Eli Lilly With U.s. Backing Of New Diabetes Drug

October 18, 2017 / 8:36 PM / in 6 months Novo Nordisk takes aim at Eli Lilly with U.S. backing of new diabetes drug WASHINGTON/COPENHAGEN (Reuters) - Denmarks Novo Nordisk will take aim at Eli Lilly in the growing diabetes market after an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the green light to its semaglutide drug. FILE PHOTO: The logo of Danish multinational pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk is pictured on the facade of a production plant in Chartres, north-central France, April 21, 2016. REUTERS/Guillaume Souvant Shares in Novo Nordisk rose almost 3 percent in early trading on Thursday, after the panel late on Wednesday concluded semaglutide is effective, reasonably safe and should be approved by the FDA. The panel voted 16-0 with one abstention in favor of the drug being approved. It would compete with others in a class known as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, which imitate an intestinal hormone that stimulates the production of insulin. The FDA, due to decide on the drug by Dec. 5, typically follows the recommendations of its advisors. This should pave the way for a timely approval, Chief Scientific Officer Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen said in an interview. Novo Nordisk expects semaglutide, administered through a once-weekly injection, will take market share from Eli Lillys once-weekly Trulicity, which in turn has been taking share from Novo Nordisks once-daily Victoza. When you have the best (drug), if you cannot win market share, you should do be doing something other than supplying medicine to people, said Thomsen. Novo will also target some 95 percent of the around 30 million diabetics in the United States who currently dont use GLP-1 drugs, he said. Novo plans to price semaglutide, which has yet to get a brand name, in a sim Continue reading >>

Uk Diabetes Industry

Uk Diabetes Industry

Diabetes industry guides to the 11 largest pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies producing diabetes related products or those involved with diabetes research. This section of Diabetes.co.uk provides information about diabetes companies that operate in the UK. Diabetes is a major problem in the UK, and as such a large healthcare and treatment industry has built up around it. Pharmaceutical companies are responsible for the research, development, testing and distribution of: The following companies are involved in the UK diabetes industry, and their products help many UK diabetics to have a better quality of life. For breaking UK diabetes industry news, and diabetes news about each of the following companies, please check Diabetes News regularly. We also cover the latest breakthroughs from all over the world on our Facebook and twitter pages - join us @diabetescouk. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was for Continue reading >>

January 4, 2018 Breaking News:

January 4, 2018 Breaking News:

Why Is Dr. Oz Being Sued by Big Pharma For Sharing This Revolutionary Diabetes Curing Diet? Currently, Dr. Oz is trending on Social Media because of a legal battle between him and three of the biggest pharmaceutical companies around. The companies claim a diabetes curing diet Dr. Oz found called 7 Steps to Health and The Big Diabetes Lie should be taken off of the internet. The public claims big pharma doesn’t like it because it hurts their profits. Being one of the most trusted names in the world when it comes to modern medicine. Dr. Oz’s followers are confident “He will never ever recommend something to people that could hurt them”. When Dr. Oz found out that 7 Steps to Health and The Big Diabetes Lie is responsible for over 11,000 people per year being fully cured of type 2 diabetes; he knew the world had to see this. It just so happens those same drug companies experienced a collective 18-point drop in their stock values right before the lawsuit was filed. Dr. Oz’s supporters have taken their frustration to social media saying that losing money is the real reason they’re suing him. Many people think this is the true reason for them filing the lawsuit against him. Dr. Sidorov discovered the cure for type 2 diabetes over 9 years ago. However, he couldn’t continue his research because the diabetes-drug company Sanofi bought out the organization that funded his research, then scrapped his project to silence him. Dr. Max Sidorov’s discovery... In his study of countless patients, he discovered that type 2 diabetes doesn’t cause the insulin blocking layer of fat to form and settle around the pancreas like the medical community originally thought it did. Rather, that nuisance layer of fat that blocks insulin is in fact, the real cause for diabetes! This is Continue reading >>

Top 10 Pharmaceutical Companies 2017: Anti-diabetics

Top 10 Pharmaceutical Companies 2017: Anti-diabetics

Diabetes Mellitus is a physical condition associated with high blood sugar. It can have long-term detrimental effects on the blood vessels, heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves. In 2015, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in America.. Epidemiology Despite the advances in diabetes treatment, it is still a major health problem. It can happen at any age, though, older patients suffer most from this disease. Furthermore, diabetes can attack a person from all racial and ethnic groups. However, people of certain races — including Hispanics, blacks, Asian-Americans and American Indians— are at higher risk. Diabetes is caused by inadequate insulin activity. In some cases, the cells of the body are unable to respond to insulin properly, causing this malicious disease. More than 90% of all cases of diabetes are type 2, and the risk factors include obesity, family history, inactivity, and high blood pressure. According to American Diabetes Association, 30.3 million Americans, i.e., 9.4% of the population, had diabetes in 2015. Out of them, nearly 1.25 million American children and adults had type 1 diabetes. In that year, 79,535 people died in America due to complications related to diabetes. Market of Anti-Diabetic Drugs In 2016, the size of anti-diabetics market was $43.6bn. With its worldwide market share of 5.4%, anti-diabetics maintained its dominant position in the market of prescription drugs and OTC. Novo Nordisk still dominates the anti-diabetics market, with its global market share of 29.7% in 2016. In this year, Novo Nordisk earned $12.9bn by selling anti-diabetic products, mainly Victoza, NovoRapid, and Tresiba. With its popular GLP-1 Trulicity, Eli Lilly is also maintaining its leading position. In 2016, the global sales of Trulicity reached $926M, with 2.1% Continue reading >>

5 Companies Dominating Diabetes

5 Companies Dominating Diabetes

The diabetes treatment business is booming. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million Americans are affected by diabetes. That's more than 8% of the U.S. population. S&P's Rating Services estimates that the global diabetes market will grow to 280 million people in the next 20 years, elevating sales of diabetes-related treatments from $35 billion to $58 billion. Steady growth markets tend to draw cartoon dollar signs over the eyes of big pharma players. The diabetes market currently includes products from Novo Nordisk (NYSE:NVO), Sanofi (NYSE:SNY), MannKind (NASDAQ:MNKD), and the diabetes partnership of Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE:BMY) and AstraZeneca (NYSE:AZN). Which company has the best shot at dominating the diabetes market of the future? What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder where the body isn't properly able to process the glucose broken down from food. Insulin is a hormone that is supposed to direct glucose into cells to provide energy. If the insulin isn't able to successfully do this job, an excess of glucose builds up in the blood, and this can lead to serious side effects including cardiovascular problems, kidney failure, and blindness. Type 1 diabetes players There are two predominant types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes patients are typically diagnosed in childhood, and their bodies are not able to produce insulin. Type 1 accounts for less than 10% of diabetes patients, but the smaller population doesn't equate to minimal revenues. Synthetic insulin, the go-to treatment for type 1 diabetes, can also be prescribed to type 2 diabetes patients not responding to other treatments. Novo Nordisk controls a quarter of the global diabetes market. In 2011, diabetes products alone brought in $8 billion for the company. There are estimate Continue reading >>

Drug Companies Are Profiting Huge As Diabetics Struggle To Afford Their Life

Drug Companies Are Profiting Huge As Diabetics Struggle To Afford Their Life

It’s of no surprise that many of Americans are struggling to afford their prescription drugs as prices continue to rise. But yet, little attention has been brought to the diabetes community. Where millions are dependent on a drug (hormone) that is needed everyday to stay alive. Diabetes has been around a very long time. There was a prescription for frequent urination, its most common symptom, on an Egyptian papyrus dating back to 1500 B.C. But it wasn’t until 1921 when a Canadian doctor named Dr. Frederick G. Banting and a medical student, Charles H. Best discovered insulin. Before insulin, the only treatment for Type 1 Diabetes was a starvation diet that inevitably led to death. Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease where your pancreas shuts down and no longer produces insulin. Type 2 Diabetes is where your body is resistant to insulin or doesn’t produce enough. In 1923, Dr. Frederick G. Banting sold the patent to the University of Toronto for $3 in hopes to ensure that no company could have a monopoly over this life-sustaining medication and everyone could have access to it. The discovery has transformed diabetes from a death sentence into a manageable disease. But once the University gave pharmaceutical companies the right to manufacture the drug royalty-free, diabetes quickly became their most profitable cash cow. Insulin is a billion-dollar industry with zero low-priced generic versions on the market. While most name-brand drugs have generic versions that cost less than half the price, insulin is different. Drug company officials defend their actions, saying they must bring in enough money for research and development. But critics say companies are hiding behind the innovation argument and are really just angling for bigger profits as the demand continues Continue reading >>

Top 20 Diabetes Drugs

Top 20 Diabetes Drugs

Find out which treatments are the biggest sellers. Following is a list of 20 FDA-approved treatments for patients with diabetes ranked by their 2013 sales, as reported by the companies that market them. Drugs are listed by name, sponsor(s), and sales data. Missing from the list are several treatments which were either launched last year with no sales numbers furnished by their marketers, or were launched this year. An example of the former is Johnson & Johnson’s Invokana (canagliflozin), which the company said enjoyed “strong sales” last year, without disclosing a figure. The closest to an actual number is a widely quoted estimate by Wells Fargo analyst Lawrence Biegelson projecting that Invokana was to have generated $122 million in first-year 2013 sales. Next year’s list could include several diabetes products approved this year. Two examples of these are Boehringer Ingelheim’s Jardiance (empagliflozin), a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor for type 2 diabetes in adults; and Eli Lilly’s Trulicity (dulaglutuide), a weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist for adults with type 2 diabetes. The FDA also approved AstraZeneca’s SGLT2 inhibitor Farxiga (dapagliflozin) on January 8—two months after the European Commission gave its nod to the drug under the trade name Forxiga. Farxiga/Forxiga was developed through AstraZeneca’s former diabetes alliance with Bristol-Myers Squibb, until BMS sold its interest to AZ in a deal completed February 1 and valued at up to $4.3 billion. A twice-daily combination treatment of dapagliflozin and metformin, trade-named Xigduo, won European marketing authorization on January 22, 2014, while a once-daily formulation, Xigduo XR, got FDA’s nod on October 29 and earlier gained Australian approval. Continue reading >>

The Most Innovative Companies In Diabetes

The Most Innovative Companies In Diabetes

Diabetes affects a startling number of people worldwide -- some 415 million in 2015, with 44.3 million of those in North America. About a third of people with diabetes do not know they have it. Last year Quid kicked off a new series focusing on Type 2 diabetes (which accounts for nearly 95% of the world’s cases), including an analysis of 40,000 patient posts from a leading diabetes forum. Still, we wanted to take a closer look at the disease, specifically at innovative companies treating diabetes. First we looked in our proprietary company database of 50,000 startups to see which are receiving the largest VC investments and for what. We identified more than 1,300 companies playing in the diabetes landscape. In the network above, 9.6% of companies focus on research and drug discovery, with a whopping $2.9 billion in investment in this area. And even though it includes fewer companies and makes up a much smaller portion of the network, clinical trial-stage drug manufacturers pulled in the next-highest investment figure, roughly $2 billion in total since 2012. Next, companies in glucose monitoring, diagnostics, and immune-based therapies make up a significant portion of the network and account for a huge chunk of the funds raised. One cluster was particularly interesting in this map: startups in the biotech, small molecules and drug delivery cluster account for just 2.7% of the network but pulled in relatively high investment dollars, topping $955 million. Zooming in, we see that companies in this cluster produce very interesting technologies indeed. Delpor, for example, manufactures a titanium device meant to be implanted into the arm that releases drugs through passive (non-mechanical) diffusion. PhaseBio Pharmaceuticals makes a super-long-acting basal insulin for the Continue reading >>

Novo Nordisk

Novo Nordisk

Novo Nordisk is a Danish multinational pharmaceutical company headquartered in Bagsværd, Denmark, with production facilities in eight countries, and affiliates or offices in 75 countries. Novo Nordisk is controlled by majority shareholder Novo Holdings A/S which holds approximately 25% of its shares and a supermajority (75%) of its voting shares.[3] Novo Nordisk manufactures and markets pharmaceutical products and services. Key products include diabetes care medications and devices. Novo Nordisk is also involved with hemostasis management, growth hormone therapy and hormone replacement therapy. The company makes several drugs under various brand names, including Levemir, NovoLog, Novolin R, NovoSeven, NovoEight and Victoza. Novo Nordisk employs more than 40,000 people globally,[4] and markets its products in 180 countries. The corporation was created in 1989 through a merger of two Danish companies which date back to the 1920s. The Novo Nordisk logo is the Apis bull, one of the sacred animals of ancient Egypt. Novo Nordisk is a full member of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA).[5] The company was ranked 25th among 100 best companies to work for in 2010 by Fortune.[6] In January 2012, Novo Nordisk was named as the most sustainable company in the world by the business magazine Corporate Knights while spin-off company Novozymes was named fourth.[7] Novo Nordisk was ranked 72nd on “Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For®” list within the U.S. state of New Jersey as of January 2014.[8] History[edit] Behind Novo Nordisk lies a story about two Danish firms - Nordisk Insulinlaboratorium and Novo Terapeutisk Laboratorium. Nordisk Insulinlaboratorium was founded by Hans Christian Hagedorn, August Krogh and August Kongsted in 19 Continue reading >>

Top 10 Pharmaceutical Companies By Global Anti-diabetic Revenue In 2016 And 2022 (in Million U.s. Dollars)

Top 10 Pharmaceutical Companies By Global Anti-diabetic Revenue In 2016 And 2022 (in Million U.s. Dollars)

Premium This statistic displays the top ten pharmaceutical companies based on global anti-diabetic revenue in 2016 and a projection for 2022, in million U.S. dollars. In 2016, Merck & Co generated about 6.14 billion U.S. dollars in anti-diabetic revenue and is expected to generate nearly 6.5 billion U.S. dollars by 2022. Anti-diabetic medication is commonly ingested orally, with the exception of insulin, exenatide, liraglutide, and pramlintide. Drugs used to treat diabetes mellitus are often called oral hypoglycemic agents or oral antihyperglycemic agents. Statistics on "Diabetes" Everything On "Diabetes" in One Document: Edited and Divided into Handy Chapters. Including Detailed References. Continue reading >>

The Worlds Top Selling Diabetes Drugs

The Worlds Top Selling Diabetes Drugs

Lantus and Januvia, two treatments for diabetes are some of the highest selling drugs of all time and represent some of the greatest breakthroughs in diabetes control. Pharmaceutical-technology.com lists the worlds top selling diabetes drugs based on 2015 revenue. Onglyzas sales increased by 2% to $786m in 2015. Image courtesy of AstraZeneca. Lantus (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) $6.98bn Accounting for 17.2% of Sanofi-Aventis Groups aggregate net sales in 2015, Lantus continues to be the worlds top selling insulin brand despite a decline of 10.8% in sales compared to 2014 which was caused by higher discounts and slowdown of basal insulin market in the US. The decline in US sales was partially offset by the strong performance in emerging markets, which contributed to 17.3% increase in sales, driven primarily by China. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-acting recombinant human insulin analogue developed for the treatment of adult and paediatric Type 1 /Type 2 in diabetics that require basal insulin to control hyperglycaemia. The biosynthetic insulin, injected subcutaneously, mimics NPH human insulin and regulates the glucose metabolism in the body. Lantus was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April 2000. The European Commission (EC) granted marketing authorisation for Lantus, valid throughout the European Union (EU), in June the same year. Januvia (Sitagliptin 25mg, 50mg, 100mg tablets) $3.86bn Januvia (sitagliptin), the major candidate in Mercks diabetes portfolio, accounted for 64.3% of the companys revenue from diabetes drugs in 2015. Sales in the US remained strong with the company registering an increase of 3% in sales year-over-year. The effect of unfavourable foreign exchange on the drugs sales was offset by higher volumes and Continue reading >>

People With Diabetes Are Suing The Top 3 Insulin Makers

People With Diabetes Are Suing The Top 3 Insulin Makers

The law firm Hagens Berman is representing people living with diabetes in a class action suit against the ‘Big Three’ insulin makers Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi with the potential to affect any of the 29,000,000 people living with diabetes who take analog insulin. Those three pharmaceutical giants have been accused of unfairly raising their prices and thus monopolizing the insulin market by the plaintiffs in the case: people with type 1 diabetes. Hagen Berman is a very successful consumer rights firm who has won more than $260 billion in settlements against heavy hitters like pharmaceutical companies and banks. We recently reported that Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Elijah Cummings had asked the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission to look into the same three companies for possible price collusion or what they called, “anticompetitive behavior”. Now the people are taking matters into their own hands. What is the Case Against the Big Three? T1International, a UK registered charity which is the equivalent of a non-profit organization in the US, supports people around the world getting access to affordable insulin. They shared in a post that Hagens Berman has investigated the matter and that their data show that “the publicly reported, list prices of Lantus, Levemir, Novolog and Humalog have increased by more than 160% in the last five years, while the prices offered to pharmacy benefit managers stayed constant or even decreased.” T1International explains that the way it normally works, drug makers typically lower their prices for the pharmacy benefit managers, the middle men between consumers and drug makers. Hagen Berman thinks that when it comes to the insulin brands Lantus, Levemir, Novolog, and Humalog the difference b Continue reading >>

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