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Diabetes Petechiae

Petechia - Like Rash, Anyone?

Petechia - Like Rash, Anyone?

Has anyone had a rash on their legs that looks like (and may be - but no diagnosis by a doc yet) petechia - little pin-prick size dark red spots with no itching, no bumps, etc., caused by blood vessels leaking? All the doc's, and her partner's slots are full until Monday. I'm not in any pain, itch, no fever, etc., but if its a sign of something dangerous I could go to the urgent care center (although I've had it for a couple of weeks - thought nothing of it til it spread from my calf up to my thigh). I have had petechia for years. Mine is all over mostly on the inside of my arms. I also have a lot of cherry angiomas. As for what you are describing, if this is very close together or like in a mass I would suggest you get it checked out very soon. I am not insinuating anything, other than if it is spreading and something, it isn't worth not knowing. Let us know what you find out. Ginny, do you know the cause of your petechiae? I've seen all sorts of things on the web from "unknown" to low platelets, to leukemia, to mono, to meningitis. I have no other symptoms. Do you treat yours at all? Sorry I am slow in getting back to you. I have Lupus but had petechia long before the diagnoses. I also had very low platelets when the Lupus was active. Do you have an auto-immune condition? The doctors always told me that they are nothing to be concerned about. I don't think it is a matter of treating "them" as much as it is treating the condition that is causing them. I have developed more since being on Plavix and my most recent Red Blood Cell count was low. If I were you, I would request a complete blood count work up when you go to the doctor if he/she doesn't suggest it. Let me know what you find out. Hi Ginny, I do have type 1 which is autoimmune and also an autoimmune thyroid co Continue reading >>

Purpura/ Petechiae - Cancer Therapy Advisor

Purpura/ Petechiae - Cancer Therapy Advisor

B. Common Pitfalls and Side-Effects of Management of this Clinical Problem. Purpura is a small hemorrhage into the skin, mucous membrane or serosal surface. Because purpura is caused by extravasation of blood from the vasculature into the skin it does not blanch with pressure. Depending on their size, purpuric lesions are classified as: A. What is the differential diagnosis for this problem? The differential diagnosis to purpura can be divided into platelet disorders, vascular factors and coagulation factor deficiencies. B. Describe a diagnostic approach/method to the patient with this problem. 1. Historical information important in the diagnosis of this problem. Exposures to medications, drugs or chemicals History of connective tissue disease or malignancy 2. Physical Examination maneuvers that are likely to be useful in diagnosing the cause of this problem. Blanching can be tested by placing a glass slide over the area and pushing down lower extremities suggests Henoch-Schonlein purpura palms and soles suggests rickettsial infection Palpable purpura suggest vasculitis (but is not pathognomonic) Bleeding around hair follices and "corkscrew hairs" suggest vitamin C deficiency Skin hyperelasticity and joint hypermobility suggest Ehlers-Danlos syndrome 3. Laboratory, radiographic and other tests that are likely to be useful in diagnosing the cause of this problem. Initial laboratory testing should include: A skin biopsy can be obtained depending on the clinical circumstance. C. Criteria for Diagnosing Each Diagnosis in the Method Above. D. Over-utilized or wasted diagnostic tests associated with the evaluation of this problem. III. Management while the Diagnostic Process is Proceeding. A. Management of Clinical Problem Purpura/Petechiae. Management depends on the etiolog Continue reading >>

Common Causes Of Petechiae: Learn How Skin Trauma, Infections And Nutritional Deficiencies Cause Tiny Red Dots On The Surface Of The Skin

Common Causes Of Petechiae: Learn How Skin Trauma, Infections And Nutritional Deficiencies Cause Tiny Red Dots On The Surface Of The Skin

Common Causes of Petechiae: Learn How Skin Trauma, Infections and Nutritional Deficiencies Cause Tiny Red Dots on the Surface of the Skin What Are Petechiae? Common Causes of Tiny Red Dots on the Skin written by: DulceCorazon edited by: Emma Lloyd updated: 8/31/2010 If you have ever noticed tiny red dots on your skin, you may have had petechiae. These dots form in response to skin trauma or other conditions. Learn more about the common causes to better understand why these dots form. There are capillaries under the skin which connect the small veins with the small arteries. When blood leaks, or bleeds in these capillaries, it manifests as petechiae on the skin. This may occur in disease conditions where blood clotting mechanisms inside the body are defective, or in cases where the number of platelets in the circulation are lower than normal. Petechiae are seen as clusters of tiny red dots, about one to three millimeters each, that appear anywhere in the body, commonly in the ankle, feet and legs. They are often not raised or elevated from the skin. Their presence is frequently an indication of an underlying medical condition. Here are the common causes of petechiae: Direct injury or trauma to the skin can cause the formation of petechiae. The number of petechiae is usually dependent on the severity of the trauma, with the most severe skin trauma showing as bruises that are often wider and may vary in color as they heal. Intake of drugs, like those prescribed for diabetes and chemotherapy, may also lead to petechiae in susceptible individuals. Corticosteroids and warfarin are other drugs that can also present with petechiae formation. Petechiae formation is usually a symptom that may be seen in several diseases that affect the human body. Examples of these diseases are Continue reading >>

Henochschnlein Purpura In A Patient With Diabetic Nephropathy And Vascular Complications

Henochschnlein Purpura In A Patient With Diabetic Nephropathy And Vascular Complications

HenochSchnlein purpura in a patient with diabetic nephropathy and vascular complications Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 20, Issue 7, 1 July 2005, Pages 15141515, Alessandro Cavarape, Eva Quinkenstein, Stefano Pizzolitto, Giorgio Soardo, Leonardo Sechi; HenochSchnlein purpura in a patient with diabetic nephropathy and vascular complications, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 20, Issue 7, 1 July 2005, Pages 15141515, Despite the high incidence of diabetic nephropathy worldwide, diabetic patients seldom undergo renal biopsy. This usually occurs when an otherwise unexplained rapid loss of renal function or appearance of haematuria requires a histological evaluation, explaining why the incidence of superimposed glomerulopathies in diabetic patients is probably underestimated [ 16 ]. We report the case of a 59-year-old obese and hypertensive man with a 10 year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, admitted to hospital because of progression of a necrotic foot ulcer. Four days before admission, vomiting, colicky abdominal pain and diarrhoea associated with diffuse, self-limiting arthralgias, and petechial rash of both legs and arms occurred. The past medical history showed proteinuria (12 g/24 h) and renal failure, with plasma creatinine stable at 2.6 mg/dl. The patient denied use of drugs other than his usual medication (insulin, enalapril, amlodipine, doxazosin and furosemide) in the last 6 weeks. On admission, the patient's body temperature was 36.7C, heart rate 102 b.p.m. and blood pressure 180/80 mmHg. Ankle oedema and a diffuse, symmetric, palpable purpuric rash at the extensor surfaces of the upper and lower limbs were evident. The right second toe showed a deep ulcer with a sero-purulent exudation and perilesional oedema. A mild, non-proliferativ Continue reading >>

Petechiae Causes - Mayo Clinic

Petechiae Causes - Mayo Clinic

Bennett JE, et al. The acutely ill patient with fever and rash. In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. Accessed March 10, 2015. Hoffman R, et al. Clinical approach to the patient with bleeding or bruising. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013. Accessed March 10, 2015. AskMayoExpert. Streptococcal pharyngitis (strep) (adult and pediatric). Rochester, Minn. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014. Ely JW, et al. The generalized rash: Part 1. Differential diagnosis. American Family Physician. 2010;81:735. www.aafp.org/afp. Accessed March 10, 2015. Nachman RL, et al. Platelets, petechiae, and preservation of the vascular wall. New England Journal of Medicine. 2008;395:1261. Fett N. Evaluation of adults with cutaneous lesions of vasculitis. Accessed March 10, 2015. Raffini L. Evaluation of purpura in children. Accessed March 10, 2015. Boos SC, et al. Physical abuse in children: Epidemiology and clinical manifestations. Accessed March 10, 2015. Drews RE. Approach to the adult patient with a bleeding diathesis. Accessed March 10, 2015. Paulman PM, et al. Bleeding and bruising. In: Signs and Symptoms in Family Medicine. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier, 2012. Accessed March 11, 2015. Pazirandeh S, et al. Overview of vitamin K. Accessed March 10, 2015. Hjelle B. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. Accessed March 10, 2015. George JN. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia. Accessed March 11, 2015. Atropen. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Accessed March 11, 2015. Norpramin. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Accessed March 11, 2015. Furadantin. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Accessed March 11, 2015. Litin SC Continue reading >>

Skin Manifestations Of Internal Disease

Skin Manifestations Of Internal Disease

As the largest organ in the body, the skin may reveal the first manifestations of internal disease. The astute clinician can often use dermatologic findings to diagnose an underlying systemic disease. This chapter outlines some of the most important skin manifestations of internal disease. Common yet clinically important systemic diseases will be reviewed, and their most notable skin findings will be delineated. Hyperlipidemia is a well-known risk factor for coronary artery disease. Hyperlipidemia may be a primary disorder or secondary to another cause. Primary hyperlipidemia consists of dyslipidemia syndromes while secondary hyperlipidemia may be associated with endocrine disorders, renal disorders, chronic liver disease, medications, and pregnancy. Xanthomas and xanthelasmas are dermatologic manifestations indicative of a possible abnormality in lipid metabolism. Xanthomas appear as yellowish or pink papules, plaques, or nodules. Histologically, dermal accumulations of lipid-laden macrophages are characteristic. Eruptive xanthomas are small papules that appear suddenly on the buttocks, hands, or extensor surfaces, sometimes accompanied by pruritus or tenderness. They are associated with very high triglyceride levels and clear rapidly when serum lipid levels are lowered. They can also be secondary to uncontrolled diabetes. Patients with eruptive xanthomas are at risk of developing severe pancreatitis and should be appropriately managed with dietary and pharmacologic interventions such as statins to normalize serum lipid levels. Tuberous xanthomas tend to be larger and deeper than eruptive xanthomas and evolve slowly. They appear on the knees, palms, or extensor surfaces of the body. The lesions are painless and due to cholesterol accumulation within the tissues. Tuber Continue reading >>

Rash | Children With Diabetes Forums

Rash | Children With Diabetes Forums

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. My DD woke up with a rash on her arms and legs. It looks like bruises. We went to the doctor last night and dermatologist today and neither of them have a clue what it could be. We have a phone call in to her endocrinologist. She did not eat, wear or use any different products and her BS has been fine. They are not near her Pod or Dex sites. It may not be associated with her diabetes, but I thought this would be a good place to ask. Has anyone had issues with rashes that look like bruises? This caught my eye because my older son (does not have diabetes) had a problem once that was something like this - and some medical testing fortunately came back negative for any issues. I found some causes for possible rash issues that can look like bruising on this website: If she isn't having any other symptoms then obviously not the 2nd one. My son had petechiae which can be a sign of several things - fortunately he had nothing serious but his pediatrician was immediately concerned (she thought he had leukemia as I found out later). He had several tests for bleeding disorders, etc. and all were negative. Petechiae info: I'm not trying to scare you because I don't think it is anything to worry about but I don't know why this sort of rash showing bleeding under the skin (hence the bruise appearance) wouldn't trigger them to run some simple blood tests. However it sounds like you've been to two doctors already! This website notes that petechiae and bruising are not usually the FIRST symptoms to appear if there is a serious problem - so I'd hope that allays that concern: If there is any change in her condition (such as she feels sick, fever, etc.) I'd go to the ER right then an Continue reading >>

Petechiae And Purpura With/without Fever

Petechiae And Purpura With/without Fever

This document is only valid for the day on which it is accessed. Please read our disclaimer . Purpura/petechiae is the name given to the discolouration of theskin or mucous membranes due to haemorrhage from small bloodvessels. Petechiae are small, purpuric lesions up to2mm across Palpable purpura is purpura than can be felt,due to inflammation of the blood vessels (vasculitis) Ecchymoses or bruises are largerextravasations of blood. There are many causes of fever and petechiae. These include: Viral infections including enteroviruses and influenza Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcal)disease Other causes of bacteremia including Streptococcus pneumoniaeand Haemophilus influenzae Other diseases including Henoch Schonlein purpura, ITP andleukaemia Illness characterised by vomiting or coughing causing petechiaearound the head and neck region All children with fever and petechiae should bereviewed by a registrar or consultant. The majority of children with fever and petechiae do not havean identifiable cause - they are presumably due to viralinfections. At least 90% of children with fever and petechiae will NOT havemeningococcal disease. However, recognition andearly treatment of the child withmeningococcal disease isparamount. Clinical signs and laboratory investigations may help determinethose who should be treated for suspected meningococcaldisease All unwell children with fever and petechiae should betreated for meningococcaemia. See MeningococcaemiaGuideline for details on the management of a child withsuspected meningococcal disease. Important principles in the management of meningococcal diseaseinclude immediate fluid resuscitation, early administration ofantibiotics (3rd generation cephalosporin) and involvement ofintensive care staff. Children should be considered Continue reading >>

Cutaneous Reactions Of The Extremities Of Diabetics To Local Thermal Trauma.

Cutaneous Reactions Of The Extremities Of Diabetics To Local Thermal Trauma.

Cutaneous reactions of the extremities of diabetics to local thermal trauma. An earlier report described cutaneous lesions, consisting of erythema with or without necrosis, on the legs and/or feet of elderly diabetics and the cause was suggested to be an altered reaction to precipitating factors such as cardiac decompensation. The present investigation concerns the cutaneous reactions to traumatization with local heat or cold to the skin of legs and forearms of 35 diabetics and 25 controls. Petechiae within the area of traumatization with either heat or cold were observed more often in diabetics than in controls. They occurred more frequently on the legs than on the forearms. Among the controls, petechiae were observed only in those over 50 years of age and only on the legs. In the diabetics under 50, petechiae were almost always observed when the duration of diabetes was 10 years or more but seldom in young patients with diabetes of short duration. The duration of diabetes was not significantly related to the occurrence of petechiae in diabetics over 50. In these diabetics, moreover, petechiae developed after traumatization with heat of a lower temperature than that which caused petechiae to appear in corresponding controls. The initial skin lesions in dermopathia diabetica (Melin) have a reddened border. The skin of the legs of some of the diabetics developed an intensely reddened border round the area of experimental heat or cold traumatization. These patients were either elderly diabetics or younger patients with diabetes of long duration. Each of them had dermopathia diabetica and each developed atrophic circumscribed skin lesions on the site of traumatization. Nineteen diabetics had dermopathia diabetica and 16 of them developed atrophic circumscribed skin lesion Continue reading >>

Will You Have Petechiae With Type 2 Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Will You Have Petechiae With Type 2 Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Type 2 diabetes and Petechiae - from FDA reports Petechiae is found among people with Type 2 diabetes, especially for people who are female, 60+ old, take medication Januvia and have High blood pressure. This review analyzes which people have Petechiae with Type 2 diabetes. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 59 people who have Type 2 diabetes from FDA , and is updated regularly. 59 people who have Type 2 Diabetes and Petechiae are studied. Gender of people who have Type 2 Diabetes and experience Petechiae *: Age of people who have Type 2 Diabetes and experience Petechiae *: Top co-existing conditions for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol: 8 people, 13.56% Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood): 17 people, 28.81% Blood Glucose Increased: 8 people, 13.56% Pancytopenia (medical condition in which there is a reduction in the number of red and white blood cells, as well as platelets): 7 people, 11.86% * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. Do you have Petechiae with Type 2 diabetes? Print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Type 2 diabetes can be treated by Metformin, Metformin hydrochloride, Januvia, Glipizide, Victoza ( latest reports from 199,001 Type 2 diabetes patients ) Petechiae (a small red or purple spot caused by bleeding into the skin) has been reported by people with high blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, atrial fibrillation/flutter, depression ( latest reports from 8,778 Petechiae patients ). Support group for people who have Petechiae (126 members) More questions for: Type 2 diabetes , Petechiae A study for a 73 year old man who takes Paracetamol, Simvastatin WARNING: Please DO Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Petechia

Diabetes And Petechia

Treato found 29 discussions about Petechia and Diabetes on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Diabetes in patients' discussions Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. The main types of diabetes are Type 1, and Type 2... Last week he noticed these spots on his arm and googled and ... "So, while my HA is obviously reflected around myself, it would surprise those close to me that it actually extends to my loved ones. I try not to let this show as I don't want them catching my hypochondria so to speak. With my loved ones and heath concerns I play the role of being logical and positive. Today I am finding this hard. My BF went to the doctor this morning and was told he is obese and at risk for diabetes due to this. They also got him to do some blood tests. Nothing read more... alarming in that, he hasn't had blood tests done in years. My panic is surrounded by what the results will be. Last week he noticed these spots on his arm and goo Continue reading >>

"diabetes And Petechia": Diabetes Community - Support Group

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088. The opinions expressed in WebMD Communities are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Communities are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment. Do not consider Communities as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately. Continue reading >>

Petechial Rash...normal For Diabetes??

Petechial Rash...normal For Diabetes??

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I seem to have this every summer. I get a heavy petechial rash on my legs! Whether wearing trousers or wearing shorts. It is not a heat rash it just seems to be loads and loads of tiny spots that appear to be burst capillaries. There is no itching but certainly looks unsightly. I am just wondering whether this is to do with diabetes or my vascular disease or indeed a combination of both. Does anyone else have this problem?? I am hesitating to go to the GP with them as they really do not cause any discomfort. Just interested to find out whether connected to Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Petechiae

Diabetes-related Causes Of Petechiae

Our information shows that 1causes of Petechiae are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 113total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Petechiae if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Petechiae as a side effect. By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use . Continue reading >>

Rumpel-leede Phenomenon In A Diabetes Mellitus Patient

Rumpel-leede Phenomenon In A Diabetes Mellitus Patient

A 56-year-old woman has history of Type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension for >20 years. After a regular non-invasive blood pressure cuff was placed on his right arm above the elbow to measure blood pressure, asymptomatic skin rash on the right forearm appeared. Physical examination revealed numerous small non-blanching erythematous and violaceous macules confined from the elbow to the tips of the digits ( Figure 1 ). The remainders of the patients extremities were examined, but no other areas were affected. Her laboratory results including platelet count, prothrombin time and bleeding time were all in normal range. Her petechiae resolved completely after 12 days. Numerous small non-blanching erythematous and violaceous macules confined from the elbow to the tips of the digits. Clinical differential diagnosis of petechiae, including Henoch-Schonlein purpura, thrombocytopenic petechiae, progressive pigmentary dermatosis, acute capillary rupture syndrome (ACRS) and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy should be considered. Based on the history and physical examination, this patients petechiae is caused by an acute mechanical trauma of capillary walls and defined as ACRS. ACRS, also as known as Rumpel-Leede phenomenon, is the appearance of petechiae in an area after prolonged invasive blood pressure application. Initially, it was described in 1909 by Rumpel and in 1911 by Leede. They found that appearance of petechiae below the area with application of tourniquet about 10 min or less. Lesions are manifested by numerous asymptomatic non-palpable, non-blanching macules limited to the area below the application of tourniquet. This finding is related either to a vasculopathy or to a reduced number or function of the platelets. 1 , 2 Patients with diabetes mellitus or hy Continue reading >>

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