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Diabetes Pee Smell

Common Causes Of Smelly Pee

Common Causes Of Smelly Pee

Smelly pee on its own isn't usually a cause for concern. There are often things you can do to help your pee return to normal. Pee is usually clear or pale yellow, with a mild smell. Common things that can make your pee smell stronger include: certain types of food and drink, like asparagus or coffee being dehydrated some medicines vitamin B6 supplements Things you can do yourself Try these things to help keep your pee clear and smelling mild. drink plenty of fluids, particularly water or squash – drink more in hot weather and when exercising eat garlic or asparagus – they contain strong-smelling chemicals that can pass into your pee See a GP if you have smelly pee and: you need to pee suddenly, or more often than usual you have pain or a burning sensation when peeing there's blood in your pee you have lower tummy pain you feel tired and unwell you're feeling confused or agitated These may be symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI). Less common causes of smelly pee Other symptoms you have might give you an idea of what's causing your pee to smell. But don't self-diagnose – always see a GP. Symptoms Possible cause Feeling very thirsty and tired, peeing more than usual, sweet-smelling pee type 2 diabetes Lower back pain, pain when peeing, blood in pee kidney stones Yellow skin and eyes (jaundice), tummy pain, nausea and vomiting liver failure Next review due: 16/10/2020 Call 111 If you can’t speak to your GP or don’t know what to do next. Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Out of all the things in the world, and you pick up urine to write about. Is that what you’re thinking about? It may sound strange and bizarre to listen or read about urine, but boy it’s important down to every line. Urine is one thing that can offer great insight into the diabetic condition of the patient. We here would look into the correlation between diabetes and urine as part of our informative series. Perio Protect Treatment Non-surgical, Painless, Easy Method Using an FDA- Cleared Medical Device perioprotect.com Let’s head down and have a look as to how your urine says a lot about your health condition. Diabetes & Urine, A strange yet important relation It has long been practices that the urine color, consistency, and smell has been a benchmark for seeking the status of diabetes within the patient’s body. Up until the recent development of sophisticated machines that help gauge blood glucose levels, urine helped in finding the answers that one sought. But nonetheless, urine still hasn’t lost its place in today’s time of medical practices. Frequent Urination and Diabetes One of the major symptoms of diabetes is increased urination in the patient. The situation in which our body tends to urinate more than the normal is also known as polyuria. When a patient suffers from any type of diabetes, type 1 or type 2, the major symptom of the condition is the excessive passage of urine. In other words, you not only want to urinate more frequently but the volume also increases each time you urinate. In a healthy person, the volume of urine that passes is somewhere around 1-2 liters. However, in the case of diabetes, the patient passes around 3-4 liters of urine each day. Why Does Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination? We know understand the reasons as to why diabetes Continue reading >>

See A Doctor If Your Pee Looks, Smells, Or Feels Like This

See A Doctor If Your Pee Looks, Smells, Or Feels Like This

See a Doctor if Your Pee Looks, Smells, or Feels Like This What does your bladder need to do, send you smoke signals? When you hit the restroom, do you regularly turn around and give whats in the bowl a quick once-over before flushing? If you answered no, well, its time to start. Thats because the color, odor, and consistency of your urinenot to mention the way it feels when its streaming out of youcan clue you in to whats going on in your body. Here, seven warning signs to be on thelookout for every time you go: No, this has nothing to do with your dessert habits. Sweet-smelling urine is often an important clue in the diagnosis of diabetes, says Holly Phillips, M.D., a womens health specialist and medical contributor for CBS2 News in New York City. And for people who know they have diabetes, the sweet smell can indicate that their blood-sugar level isnot as under control as it should be. Consider it a tip-off to the presence of bacteria that could indicate a urinary tract infection (UTI). The cloudiness comes from the excretion of bacteria and leukocytes, which are cells that fight infection, says Phillips. Even if you otherwise feel fine and have no UTI symptoms, pay attention to this; it could be the only sign that an infection has taken hold. RELATED: Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Public Toilets Though red-purple hued veggies like beets and blackberries might be the culprit, the color can also indicate the presence of blood in your peenot a good sign. Thats a symptom of a UTI, kidney stones, or in rare cases even bladder or kidney cancer, says Phillips. Urine isnt supposed to smell like roses, but if the stench is pretty foul (think: rotten fruit or the bottom of a pond), its your bladders alarming way of telling you theres an infection, says Phillips. Continue reading >>

My Urine Smells Sweet!

My Urine Smells Sweet!

My urine is VERY strong in odor, like a sickeningly sweet smell. I check my blood sugar regularly, and it is consistently 85–105. I have never had diabetes. I frequently feel an urgency to urinate, though I do not experience any pain or burning. What could be some causes of the sweet-smelling urine? — Nancy, Arizona Odor is one of the characteristics of urine that can be used to identify and describe medical conditions. Urine odor can also be affected by many foods, medications, and vitamin supplements; asparagus, for instance, has a characteristic effect on urine odor. While most aspects of urinalysis are quantitative and objective, urine has a characteristic smell that varies by species and concentration. Sweet-smelling urine may be the result of either glucose or ketone excesses in the urine. Since you have blood sugars consistently in the 85–105 range, it does not appear that you suffer from diabetes. However, ketonuria could be the cause, which comes from excessive dieting or other rare metabolic conditions. For example, a rare inborn metabolic syndrome called "maple syrup urine" occurs in infants and children, but this condition is associated with neurological problems and would not present itself in adulthood. The sense of urgency that you feel is likely unrelated to the odor of your urine. Of course, all urine parameters are affected by urine volume. Patients with very low fluid intake will have very concentrated urine, which is more likely to exude a particular odor. All unexplained symptoms should be evaluated by a physician. A standard urinalysis is an important first step, along with a careful history and a detailed physical examination. Learn more in the Everyday Health Healthy Living Center. Continue reading >>

Sweet-smelling Urine

Sweet-smelling Urine

Why does my urine smell sweet? If you notice a sweet or fruity aroma after urinating, it may be a sign of a more serious medical condition. There are a variety of reasons why your pee smells sweet. The smell is affected because your body is expelling chemicals into your urine. These may be bacteria, glucose, or amino acids. If you notice a sudden onset of sweet-smelling urine, you should contact your doctor immediately. 1. UTI Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are very common infections of the urinary system. For an infection to occur, bacteria must travel up the urethra. The urethra is the tube through which urine flows from your bladder to outside your body. Because of the female anatomy, women are more likely to get UTIs. One of the first signs of an UTI is strong- or sweet-smelling urine. This is because bacteria is dispelled into the urine. Other symptoms are an ongoing urge to pee and a burning sensation when you go. Your doctor can diagnose a UTI using urinalysis. You can purchase pain relievers over the counter that can help with the pain, but only a doctor can prescribe antibiotics that will treat the infection. 2. Hyperglycemia and diabetes Hyperglycemia occurs when you have abnormally high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is a tell-tale sign of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, you may notice your pee smells sweet or fruity. This is because the body is trying to get rid of the excess blood sugar and is disposing of glucose through your urine. For people who haven’t been diagnosed with diabetes, this symptom can be one of the first signs they have the disease. Diabetes can be diagnosed with urinalysis and blood tests. For those with a diagnosis, it can be a sign they’re mismanaging the condition. Treatment for diabetes depends on the Continue reading >>

Urine Odor

Urine Odor

Most changes in urine odor are not a sign of disease and go away in time. Some foods and medicines, including vitamins, may affect your urine's odor. For example, eating asparagus causes a distinct urine odor. Foul-smelling urine may be due to bacteria. Sweet-smelling urine may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes or a rare disease of metabolism. Liver disease and certain metabolic disorders may cause musty-smelling urine. Some conditions that can cause changes in urine odor include: Bladder infection Body is low on fluids (concentrated urine can smell like ammonia) Poorly controlled diabetes (sweet smelling urine) Liver failure Continue reading >>

Sweet-smelling Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And When To See A Doctor

Sweet-smelling Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And When To See A Doctor

Urine may smell sweet if it contains extra glucose, which is a type of sugar. Diabetes is a common causes of this, but the smell of someone's urine can also change for other reasons. Urine can reveal a lot about someone's health. So while it might feel strange to discuss the odor of urine with a doctor, it is important that a person talks to a health provider if they notice a sudden change in the appearance or odor of their urine. In this article, we discuss the reasons for sweet- or fruity-smelling urine, symptoms, warning signs, and when to see a doctor. The look and odor of urine may be affected by a person's diet. Because urine helps the body get rid of waste, a person's diet and fluid intake can affect the way their urine looks and smells. If the odor of urine changes temporarily, this could be caused by something a person has eaten recently. For example, asparagus can give the urine an unusually strong odor. Some disorders, medications, and supplements may also affect the way urine smells. A person who notices a change in the smell of their urine should monitor their symptoms, and if they continue, should talk to a doctor. The most common reasons why urine may smell sweet include: Taking vitamin B6 supplements can change the smell of urine. A person with uncontrolled diabetes may have blood glucose levels that are dangerously high. The body tries to get rid of the extra glucose in the urine, and this can cause a sweet smell. People with sweet-smelling urine due to diabetes may notice other symptoms, including: This condition occurs when a person does not have enough insulin and usually, but not always, very high blood sugar levels. Insulin helps the body break down glucose to use for fuel. When the body cannot produce enough insulin to use glucose, it begins brea Continue reading >>

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

I realize that it may seem strange to be reading a posting about urine. However, last week I wrote about urinary tract infections (which we know are common both in women and in people who have diabetes), so I think this week’s topic is relevant. Also, the color, smell, and consistency of your urine can give you and your doctor helpful information about what might be going on in your body. Historically, looking at urine has been a way for doctors to gauge a person’s health, especially before other types of testing were available. If you’ve had diabetes for a long time or know someone who has, you’ll know that urine testing was a way to figure out how well controlled (or uncontrolled) a persons’ diabetes was — this was done in the days before blood glucose meters were available. Now, of course, we have more sophisticated tools to convey glucose information. But urine still has its place. What is urine? Urine is a waste product that contains breakdown products from food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics, environmental contaminants, and by-products from metabolism and bacteria. Amazingly, urine contains more than 3,000 compounds — much more than what’s found in other body fluids, like saliva or cerebrospinal fluid. The kidneys do a remarkable job of filtering and concentrating to help get these compounds out of the body (you can understand why keeping your kidneys healthy is so important). So, what is your urine telling you? If your urine is… Bright yellow. This may look alarming, especially when your urine seems to be glowing in the dark. But don’t worry — the bright yellow color is likely due to vitamins, specifically, B vitamins and beta carotene. Green or blue. Green or blue urine seems like something straight out of a science fiction movie, but the co Continue reading >>

Urine Odor: Symptoms & Signs

Urine Odor: Symptoms & Signs

ANORO is only approved for use in COPD. ANORO is NOT approved for use in asthma. People with asthma who take long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as vilanterol (one of the medicines in ANORO), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines increase the risk of death in people with COPD. Call your healthcare provider if breathing problems worsen over time while using ANORO. Get emergency medical care if your breathing worsens quickly or if use of your rescue inhaler does not relieve your breathing problems. Do not use ANORO to treat sudden breathing problems. Always have a rescue inhaler with you to treat sudden symptoms. It is not known if ANORO is safe and effective in people with asthma. Do not use ANORO if you have a severe allergy to milk proteins or any of the ingredients in ANORO. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure. Do not use ANORO more often than prescribed. Do not take ANORO with other medicines that contain a LABA or an anticholinergic for any reason. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take and about all of your health conditions. ANORO can cause serious side effects, including: sudden breathing problems immediately after inhaling your medicine. If you experience this, stop using ANORO and call your healthcare provider right away. serious allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency medical care if you get any of the following symptoms: rash hives swelling of your face, mouth, and tongue breathing problems effects on heart increased blood pressure a fast or irregular heartbeat, awareness of heartbeat chest pain effects on nervous system new or worsened eye problems, including acute narrow-angle glaucoma that can cause permanent loss of vis Continue reading >>

7 Reasons Your Pee Smells Weird

7 Reasons Your Pee Smells Weird

Your pee can tell you a lot about your health. While its color is a pretty good indicator of your hydration levels, dietary habits, and potentially, undiagnosed medical conditions, its smell can also clue you in to what's going on inside your body. "Normal urine, if you’re fairly hydrated, generally has a very limited amount of smell," Ojas Shah, M.D., NYC-based urologist and professor of urology at Columbia University Medical Center and ColumbiaDoctors Midtown, tells SELF. Sometimes you may notice that your pee is a little smellier than usual. A slight change or an increased potency is most likely due to something very minor, like a food you ate. But there are some odors that may signal an underlying health issue. Here are all the things that are likely to give you smelly urine, from the totally benign to the potentially concerning. 1. You're dehydrated. If you're not drinking enough water, your pee will take on a strong ammonia scent. Without enough H2O to dilute your urine, it becomes more concentrated with waste products and therefore, darker in color and more odorous. Drink more water, and the smell should go back to normal. 2. You have a urinary tract infection or bladder infection. "A urine infection will make your urine smell pretty foul at times," Shah says. This could signal a variety of bladder problems, like a UTI, bladder infection, or inflammation of the bladder (cystitis). If you notice your pee doesn't just smell strong, but it smells bad, you should see a doctor to get it checked out. 3. You drank a ton of coffee. Ever drink a ton of coffee on a particularly exhausting day, and thought you were going crazy because then your pee kind of maybe smelled a little bit like coffee? Well, it's not your imagination. Shah explains that no one knows the exact re Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Urine Odor?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Urine Odor?

Before digging into “How Diabetes Type 2 Affects Urine Odor?” we’d like to first cover normal urine odor. What’s considered normal urine odor? Your urine or pee is a way for your body to get rid of extra water. In addition, your body tries to flush out a lot of unnecessary materials through your urine. The urine contains a chemical called ammonia, which sometimes gives your urine a strong odor (smell). Urine is a way for the body to get rid of things that might be harmful to it or might be building up in excess within the body. Normally, your urine is yellowish in color and has no specific or somewhat strong odor. What happens to urine odor in diabetes? Something strange happens to the urine odor for type 2 diabetes. The urine starts smelling “sweet or fruity”. Why does the smell change? Your body needs sugar to accomplish all your daily activities. This sugar comes from the food you eat. To turn this sugar into energy, your body relies on a hormone called “insulin”. Think of insulin as a messenger that signals your cells to convert sugar into energy. But in diabetes type 2, your body stops responding to the insulin in your body. Your insulin is still there but it does not work the way it is supposed to. It’s the same as getting a key stuck in a door lock. The key is there but it’s not functioning the way it should. This is what happens in diabetes type 2 as well. As already mentioned, the main function of insulin is to decrease blood sugar levels by signaling body cells and turning them into energy. Once your bodies insulin fails to perform its function, your cells do not get the signal to turn blood sugar into energy and your blood levels of sugar start to rise. Once your blood sugar levels are high enough, your body cells start breaking sugar into Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

Most people have heard of the two main types of diabetes. But did you know the name has nothing to do with high blood sugar? It's a general term for any condition that causes your body to make a lot of urine. And that’s just what, diabetes insipidus does. This condition makes you extra thirsty. As a result, you pee -- a lot. Your body makes a substance called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). It’s produced in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus and stored in your pituitary gland. It tells your kidneys to hold onto water, which makes your urine more concentrated. When you’re thirsty or slightly dehydrated, ADH levels rise. Your kidneys reabsorb more water and put out concentrated urine. If you’ve had plenty to drink, ADH levels fall and what comes out is clear and dilute. When your body doesn’t make enough ADH, the condition is called central diabetes insipidus. If you make enough but your kidneys can't respond to it, you have nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In either form, the result is the same. Your kidneys can't retain water, so even if you’re dehydrated, they'll put out a lot of pale, or diluted urine. When your kidneys can’t conserve water, you’ll: Get really thirsty Pee a lot -- this is known as polyuria Some people get dehydrated. If you lose too much water, you could have: Lethargy Muscle pains Irritability If you have this condition, you’ll probably wind up at the doctor for help with your thirst and constant need for a bathroom. To diagnose you, the doctor will do a series of blood and urine tests that may take several hours. You’ll go without water the whole time, so you’ll get thirstier. Your doctor will measure the sodium in your blood and pee. He may give you an ADH substitute to see if your kidneys respond by concentrating your ur Continue reading >>

Strong-smelling Urine Not Necessarily Cause For Concern

Strong-smelling Urine Not Necessarily Cause For Concern

April 16, 2010 Dear Mayo Clinic: What could be causing my husband's urine to have a very strong odor? Is it cause for concern? He is 74 years old. Answer: Strong-smelling urine has several possible causes. One possibility, diabetes, is a serious medical concern. Other reasons can range from diet — specifically asparagus — to a urinary tract infection, which requires treatment. Causes for strong urine odor include: Urine concentration: It's normal for urine to have a stronger odor first thing in the morning. After a night's sleep, urine is more concentrated and odorous as well as brighter yellow in color. Dehydration also increases urine concentration, causing stronger smelling urine. Have your husband try drinking more water to see if the odor lessens. Hot weather or intense physical activities can contribute to dehydration, too. Concentrated urine, without any other symptoms, generally isn't harmful. Diet: For some people, eating asparagus causes urine to produce a sulfur-like smell. There are no health concerns associated with this odor. Urinary tract infection: Foul-smelling urine is a symptom of a urinary tract infection. Other symptoms are cloudy urine, an urgent need to urinate, or a burning sensation while urinating. The foul smell may be the only symptom of a urinary tract infection. With a persistent foul smell from the urine, your husband should see a physician for a urinalysis and diagnosis. A urinary tract infection needs to be treated with antibiotics to prevent kidney infection and kidney damage. Diabetes: Strong sweet-smelling urine is a sign of advanced diabetes, which can be diagnosed with urinalysis. With advanced diabetes, sugar and ketones, which are normally absent, can accumulate in the urine and create a strong odor. According to the American Continue reading >>

What Does Diabetic Urine Smell Like?

What Does Diabetic Urine Smell Like?

While I have a friend with type II diabetes that controls her weight and diabetes without any pills or shots, I would caution Karen L. Pringle with the Obama Boo Boo … talking in absolutes is dangerous … “If you like your health care … you can keep your health care”. Diet should be considered first in controlling diabetes, but some people will need to stimulate the pancreas to deliver more insulin or add an outside (exogenous Insulin shot) Insulin source. The “sweet” odor of urine and breath is actually a KETOTIC odor from utilizing fats as a source of energy … a KNOWN diabetic should never get in this much trouble … but I have worked in a hospital for 40 years and have seen a lot of stupid shit…. I know people who did it … perhaps they were their own “Munchausen’s” getting attention for themselves. The renal threshold for a normal kidney is 180 mg of glucose per 100 ml of blood. In other words, a normal kidney can actively push urine glucose back into the blood from the glomerular filtrate up to a blood sugar of 180 mg/100 ml blood. This means there would be no urine glucose detected because a mild diabetic may be able to keep their blood sugar below the 180 renal threshold. So the sweet smell is the ketone bodies (Acetone) from fat metabolism because you do not have enough Insulin for the cells to use glucose for their energy needs. The glucose builds up in the blood because the cells need insulin to get it inside the cell where it is needed. In a utopian world, a diabetic person should never get this out of control, when followed by a doctor. More likely, we live in a Faustian world where that box of Devil’s food cupcakes needs to be eaten up, or they might go bad. The other component of fat metabolism is Beta Hydroxy Butyric Acid. That Continue reading >>

Urine Smell Warning: The Scent Of Your Wee Could Be A Sign Of This Deadly Condition

Urine Smell Warning: The Scent Of Your Wee Could Be A Sign Of This Deadly Condition

Smelling your wee might not be themost pleasant of activities, but it could give you a clue as to how health you are. In a healthy person urine should not really have a smell, according to the NHS. It may have a stronger scent first thing in the morning when it is more concentrated, or if someone is dehydrated. Otherwise it should generally not be too noticeable. The NHS suggest drinking more fluids to improve the smell. Consuming asparagus, beer, garlic and coffee may give your urine a stronger smell. But only two-fifths of adults can smell the effect of asparagus due to genetics. However, these are the other reasons your urine may smell - and, in some cases, a strong scent could indicate a serious condition. Food According to the NHS, consuming asparagus, beer, garlic and coffee may give your urine a stronger smell. However, being able to smell the effect of asparagus in urine is actually down to genes - only two-fifths of adults can detect it, according to a 2016 study. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. Diabetes Abnormally sweet-smelling urine may be a sign you are not managing your diabetes properly. Other signs of uncontrolled diabetes include increased thirst, unexplained weight loss and high blood glucose readings. Uncontrolled diabetes can raise risk of heart disease and stroke. Urinary stones This condition can cause an ammonia-like smell. Depending on where the stone is located it may also be called a kidney stone or bladder stone. Symptoms may also include severe pain, nausea and vomiting. Medicines Medications and vitamin and mineral supplements can make the scent of urine more apparent. However, the NHS warn that you should never stop taking prescribed medication for this reason, unless advised by a Continue reading >>

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