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Diabetes Paranoid Delusions

Diabetes-related Causes Of Delusions

Diabetes-related Causes Of Delusions

Our information shows that 2causes of Delusions are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 176total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Delusions if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Depressive disorders - severe cases can lead to delusions arising in the negative frame of mind: The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Delusions as a side effect. Drug interactions may be a possible cause of Delusions . [See detailed list of 2drug interaction causes of Delusions ] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Delusions: The following list of conditionshave ' Delusions ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Delusions or choose View All. Continue reading >>

Delusion, Paranoia, Not Sleeping, Wandering About, Talking To Oneself, Taking Medication For Diabetes. Had Breast Cancer

Delusion, Paranoia, Not Sleeping, Wandering About, Talking To Oneself, Taking Medication For Diabetes. Had Breast Cancer

Delusion, paranoia, not sleeping, wandering about, talking to oneself, taking medication for diabetes. Had breast cancer My mother has in the last 4 or 5 days become excessively delusional and paranoid. She has not slept for 5 days and wanders abouit talking to herself. She is convinced she is going to die at a specific time. She is not that old - 54, but she has been taking medicine for diabetes for many years. She has also had breast cancer but this seems to have been dealt with successfully. These paranoid symptoms seem to have come on very quickly. I understand that her father may have had similar symptoms in later life. Have you any ideas about the cause (mostly physical, mostly "mental" or a combination of the two ?) and how this could be treated ? - Posted Sun, 22 Jul 2012 in Mental Health Usually delusions are not acute in onset except in some situations where organic medical conditions are playing a role. It would be a good idea if you can let me know that what exactly is the content of paranoid delusion? Are you sure that she was absolutely not paranoid before 5 days? Sometimes impaired blood glucose or antidiabetics can cause transient paranoia . Did you check the blood sugars during the described episode? As because she had breast cancer and is diabetic and on medications, age 54, role of organic medical cause may not be ruled out. Does she have past history of any psychiatric symptoms ? Hope, this address some of your concerns. After getting responses, I am available for further discussions I have been able to obtain further information about my mother from my sisters. I spend a lot of time abroad and they know more about her state of mind / health / drugs she is taking than I do. I now think that her recent episode is most likely to be of psychiatric orig Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Paranoid Delusions

Diabetes And Paranoid Delusions

Treato found 14 discussions about Paranoid Delusions and Diabetes on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Diabetes in patients' discussions Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. The main types of diabetes are Type 1, and Type 2... Mayo Clinic Johns Hopkins Hospital University Hospital Cleveland Clinic Brigham and Women's Hospital University Medical Center Massachusetts General Hospital Naproxen Clonazepam Lipitor Actonel Mucinex Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during c Continue reading >>

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The Link Between Schizophrenia And Diabetes

The link between schizophrenia and diabetes Current Psychiatry. 2012 October;11(10):28-46 Lead Physician, Mental Health and Metabolism Clinic, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Vigilant metabolic monitoring informs treatment decisions 1. Kohen D. Diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia: historical perspective. Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2004;47:S64-S66. 2. Dixon L, Weiden P, Delahanty J, et al. Prevalence and correlates of diabetes in national schizophrenia samples. Schizophr Bull. 2000;26(4):903-912. 3. De Hert M, van Winkel R, Van Eyck D, et al. Prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome and metabolic abnormalities in schizophrenia over the course of the illness: a cross-sectional study. Clin Pract Epidemol Ment Health. 2006;2:14.- 4. Juvonen H, Reunanen A, Haukka J, et al. Incidence of schizophrenia in a nationwide cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007;64(8):894-899. 5. Hales CN, Barker DJ. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis. Br Med Bull. 2001;60:5-20. 6. Ryan MC, Sharifi N, Condren R, et al. Evidence of basal pituitary-adrenal overactivity in first episode, drug naive patients with schizophrenia. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004;29(8):1065-1070. 7. Odawara M, Isaka M, Tada K, et al. Diabetes mellitus associated with mitochondrial myopathy and schizophrenia: a possible link between diabetes mellitus and schizophrenia. Diabet Med. 1997;14(6):503.- 8. Siuta MA, Robertson SD, Kocalis H, et al. Dysregulation of the norepinephrine transporter sustains cortical hypodopaminergia and schizophrenia-like behaviors in neuronal rictor null mice. PLoS Biol. 2010;8(6):e1000393.- 9. Strassnig M, Brar JS, Ganguli R. Nut Continue reading >>

Pregabalin Induced Confusional State With Paranoid Delusions

Pregabalin Induced Confusional State With Paranoid Delusions

Received date: March 04, 2015 Accepted date:June 07, 2015 Published date:June 09, 2015 Citation:Lindsay L, Averill A (2015) Pregabalin Induced Confusional State with Paranoid Delusions. Int J Phys Med Rehabil 3:284. doi: 10.4172/2329-9096.1000284 Copyright: 2015 Lindsay L, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. A 70yearold woman presented to an acute inpatient rehabilitation facility on postoperative day three, after undergoing left total knee arthroplasty . Her past medical history included severe osteoarthritis, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus type 2 and was negative for any psychiatric illness. The patient took metformin , celecoxib, and oxycodone/acetaminophen prior to undergoing surgical intervention. After surgery, pregabalin , 50 milligrams twice a day, was added to her previous oral analgesic regimen of celecoxib and oxycodone/acetaminophen. However, on the night of admission postoperative day two (POD #2), she developed mild paranoia. Her husband and nursing staff reassured her the entire night. In the morning, she apologized for acting strangely and participated in all therapy sessions. All medications that could cause psychiatric disturbance or delirium , including oxycodone/acetaminophen and pregabalin, were discontinued. That night, however, her paranoia returned and she remained emotionally labile and delusional despite reassurance and delirium intervention. During the night, she pulled the fire alarm in order to have the police and fire department come to protect her. The following morning, she was oriented to person, place, time, and situation, but Continue reading >>

Understanding Paranoia

Understanding Paranoia

If you would like to get involved with Living with Schizophrenias work then please leave your details. We are always looking for people to write about their experiences of schizophrenia, to contribute ideas and tips and oversee our work. Leave your email and location and details of how schizophrenia has affected you and we will be in touch. The term paranoia is often used loosely in general conversation and it is important to define it and to look at how our common usage of the term differs so greatly from the sort of paranoia experienced by people with schizophrenia. Paranoia can be thought of as thoughts of something bad happening to you and which are likely to be caused by someone or something. In the context of mental illness, these thoughts are often extreme or exaggerated and commonly have no or very little foundation in facts. Examples of this kind of paranoid thinking are that neighbours are spying on you or harassing you or that your partner is being unfaithful. When discussing paranoid thinking it is important to make a couple of qualifications. First of all not all paranoid thinking of this kind is entirely without foundation. For instance: it may well be that a jealous work colleague is interfering with your post in order to make your life difficult if he is keen on getting your job or that your partner is indeed having an illicit and secretive affair with another. Such things do happen in the world. Suspecting that we may have been short changed deliberately by a shop assistant is not evidence of mental ill health, it is a normal reaction. (Photo: I Stock) In addition it is important to acknowledge that we all, from time to time, become suspicious of people around us. For instance, if we are short- changed by a shop assistant we may suspect them of having Continue reading >>

Diabetes Delusional Behaviour

Diabetes Delusional Behaviour

Posted on August 2, 2013 | No Comments on Diabetes Delusional Behaviour Delusions are beliefs that are untrue, unreasonable and sometimes bizarre. However, a deluded person is very convinced that his delusions are as real as what he actually perceives. Delusions in the medical sense refer to imagined or created visions or fantasy held by a person that suffers some sort of mental impairment. The occurrence of delusions however is not limited to people with mental disorders as well as people under the influence of drugs. Delusions also occur to some people suffering from diabetes because psychiatric can be a complication of diabetes. While no direct medical explanation is still available, research studies have shown that delusions can be related to diabetes or a family history of diabetes. Different studies have discovered that the risk for developing dementia is amplified for people who suffer from obesity in middle age and then diabetes the later age. While medical science has not yet established a direct and universally acceptable explanation, one theory is that the occurrence of diabetes puts a stress to people and the psychological demands of having such disease tend to increase the chances of people to develop psychiatric disorders such as suffering delusions. At the moment, antipsychotic medications for diabetics suffering delusions are ill advised because antipsychotics medications have been associated with an augmented risk of weight gain, and hyper-triglyceridemia. Thus, while they may temporarily control delusional behaviour, the medicine tends to complicate and worsen the diabetic condition of the patient. In lieu of this, antipsychotics medication is not given to diabetics suffering delusional behaviour. Instead, psycho analytic treatment and counselling is Continue reading >>

Acid, Tripping & Blood Sugar Levels

Acid, Tripping & Blood Sugar Levels

Individuals with diabetes may struggle with various symptoms caused by high or low blood sugar. High blood sugars tend to cause depressive feelings and mood swings, while low blood sugar may cause scattered thoughts while extreme lows can even cause hallucinations and delusional thinking. Tripping It was November of 1989, my freshman year of college; I had just passed the clock in the center of campus when I felt weak. As my legs gave out, I tripped and fell. My blood sugar had dropped to 17mg/dL, and I didn’t have any glucose on me. Luckily, I had gotten some strength up and stumbled my way to the campus restaurant where I downed a glass of juice and recovered. There wasn’t as much information back then as there is today, but I realized the hard way that having a role of Lifesavers in my pocket at all time was important. Without them, I may have ended up having a diabetes seizure. While working as a diabetes focused psychotherapist, I have listened to multiple stories involving delusions and hallucinations during extreme low blood sugar reactions. I have also experienced that state mind during my last low blood sugar that landed me in the hospital. It was 1994 and my last year of undergrad, and I had just turned 21 years old. I was studying for an exam one afternoon in late October, and it was 3pm. The sun was glaring as it entered my bedroom. I remember looking at the clock. The clock read 11:00 pm and as I believed it was time for bed I went downstairs to the bathroom and brushed my teeth. In reality, I froze at the bottom of the steps, and I spent five minutes staring at my roommate. Then I turned around, went back upstairs to my room and went to bed. At 4pm, I awoke to demons in my room. They strapped me to a board of wood, carried me downstairs and out the fro Continue reading >>

Paranoia And Schizophrenia: What You Need To Know

Paranoia And Schizophrenia: What You Need To Know

A person who has a condition on the schizophrenia spectrum may experience delusions and what is commonly known as paranoia. These delusions may give rise to fears that others are plotting against the individual. Everyone can have a paranoid thought from time to time. On a rough day, we may find ourselves saying "Oh boy, the whole world is out to get me!" But we recognize that this is not the case. People with paranoia often have an extensive network of paranoid thoughts and ideas. This can result in a disproportionate amount of time spent thinking up ways for the individual to protect themselves from their perceived persecutors. It can lead to problems in relationships and at work. Here are some key points about paranoia in schizophrenia . More detail is in the main article. People with schizophrenia often experience confusion and fear and they may have delusions that someone is plotting against them. Since 2013, the subtype "paranoid schizophrenia" is not separate but a part of schizophrenia. Medications and other treatment enable many patients to manage their condition. Lifelong treatment is usually needed to stop symptoms from returning. Schizophrenia can cause fear, confusion, and delusions. The person may believe someone is persecuting them. Before 2013, paranoid schizophrenia was considered a type of schizophrenia, but in 2013, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth edition (DSM-5) reclassified paranoia, or delusions, as a symptom rather than a subtype. The subtypes were removed from the diagnosis criteria because of their "limited diagnostic stability, low reliability, and poor validity." They were not seen as stable conditions, and they were not helping to diagnose or treat conditions related to schizophrenia. The DSM is published by th Continue reading >>

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Psychotic Symptoms In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

Go to: CASE PRESENTATION A 36-year-old woman from an urban background presented with acute onset psychotic illness of 15 days duration precipitated by poor adherence to insulin therapy. The patient had a history of T1DM since the age of 12 years, with a well-adjusted pre-morbid personality and no family history of mental illness. Detailed exploration of the history revealed that she had experienced 3 to 4 similar psychotic episodes, each lasting for 7 to 10 days, over the last seven months, during which she would exhibit symptoms of persecution, delusion of grandiosity, smiling and muttering to herself, emotional liability, abusive behavior, angry outbursts, excessive grooming, increased religiosity, poor self-care, decreased sleep, and decreased appetite. During these episodes, there would be no clouding of consciousness, disorientation, diurnal variation in symptoms, or disturbance of other cognitive functions. All of the psychotic episodes had temporal correlation with poor adherence to insulin therapy and a rise in fasting blood glucose levels from normal range to 300mg/dL. The psychotic episodes had no associated histories of fever, infection, high caloric intake, or substance abuse. During the index episode, her fasting blood glucose levels were in the range of 300 to 515mg/dL and post-prandial blood glucose levels were 398mg/dL. All other lab work results, including those for ketoacidosis, were within normal ranges. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her brain and physical examination did not reveal any abnormality in the patient, and on mental status examination, she was well-oriented to time, place, and person; her mini mental state examination score was 27/30. She had increased speech output, labile affect, delusion of persecution, delusion of reference, dist Continue reading >>

Paranoia And Diabetes, Connection?

Paranoia And Diabetes, Connection?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My great uncle has diabetes, I am not sure which type. He is in his 80's and has said at his age he can't be bothered to adjust his lifestyle or to worry about this. I've advised him this is not a good idea and that he should listen to his doctor, but he is otherwise very independent and proud, and there is little I or the rest of the family can do about it. Suddenly, he had an episode of extreme paranoia. He has accused my mother of trying to kill him several weeks ago when she took him out for a meal. They spoke in between and things were fine, but he was suddenly convinced that she had been trying to kill him for his money. Obviously, we are very concerned. This was over the weekend so we couldn't reach his GP or ours to get advice. We had to call the out of hours support line, the person we spoke to said that the issue could be his blood sugar levels. We managed to get fold of a friend of his who called him and spoke to him about the issues with my mother, and he called her to apologize (we didn't want to go round as he was so convinced she was trying to murder him, we were worried it might make things worse). He said he couldn't remember most of the conversation and it was so odd he didn't think it had happened. We are going to see him Monday, and we are going to try to convince him to see his GP. He swears he is fine, so this will be a challenge. Has anyone heard of this before? I'm mostly looking for information I can give him to try to convince him he should speak to his GP. Dementia and a few other possibilities come to mind, as well, and I'm also trying to see what we need to rule out, and how we might be able to support him with what has ca Continue reading >>

Will You Have Delusion With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Will You Have Delusion With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Delusion is found among people with Diabetes, especially for people who are male, 60+ old, take medication Metformin and have High blood pressure. This review analyzes which people have Delusion with Diabetes. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 65 people who have Diabetes from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 65 people who have Diabetes and Delusion are studied. Gender of people who have Diabetes and experience Delusion *: Age of people who have Diabetes and experience Delusion *: Top co-existing conditions for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol: 10 people, 15.38% Schizophrenia (a mental disorder characterized by a breakdown of thought processes): 9 people, 13.85% Bipolar Disorder (mood disorder): 7 people, 10.77% Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement): 10 people, 15.38% Hallucinations (sensations that appear real but are created by your mind): 9 people, 13.85% * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Share you experience to help people like you We suggest these affordable tests for self monitoring. You can order them and receive results on eHealthMe. No doctor referral or insurance necessary. Diabetes can be treated by Metformin, Metformin hydrochloride, Lantus, Januvia, Glipizide ( latest reports from 291,118 Diabetes patients ) Delusion (a false belief or opinion) has been reported by people with schizoph Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Patterns of co-occurrence of diabetes and psychiatric disorders Comorbidity of diabetes and psychiatric disorders can present in different patterns. First, the two can present as independent conditions with no apparent direct connection. In such a scenario both are outcome of independent and parallel pathogenic pathways. Second, the course of diabetes can be complicated by emergence of psychiatric disorders. In such cases diabetes contributes to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Various biological and psychological factors mediate the emergence of psychiatric disorders in such context. Third, certain psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia act as significant independent risk factors for development of diabetes. Fourth, there could be an overlap between the clinical presentation of hypoglycemic and ketoacidosis episodes and conditions such as panic attacks. Fifth, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes could emerge as a side effect of the medications used for psychiatric disorders. Treatment of psychiatric disorders could influence diabetes care in other ways also as discussed in subsequent sections [Box 1]. Diabetes and psychiatric disorders interact in other ways as well. Certain substances of abuse such as tobacco and alcohol can alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral hypoglycemic agents. Moreover, the presence of a comorbid psychiatric disorder like depression could interfere with the management of diabetes by influencing treatment adherence. Similarly certain disorders such as phobia of needles and injections can present difficulties with investigations and treatment processes such as blood glucose testing and insulin injection. Also patients with psychiatric disorders are less likely to seek treatment. Such delays would postpone detection Continue reading >>

Will You Have Paranoia With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Will You Have Paranoia With Diabetes? - Ehealthme

Paranoia is found among people with Diabetes, especially for people who are male, 50-59 old, take medication Metformin and have Quit smoking. This review analyzes which people have Paranoia with Diabetes. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 88 people who have Diabetes from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 88 people who have Diabetes and Paranoia are studied. Gender of people who have Diabetes and experience Paranoia *: Age of people who have Diabetes and experience Paranoia *: Top co-existing conditions for these people *: High Blood Cholesterol: 13 people, 14.77% Hallucination, Auditory (perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus): 11 people, 12.50% * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Share you experience to help people like you We suggest these affordable tests for self monitoring. You can order them and receive results on eHealthMe. No doctor referral or insurance necessary. Diabetes can be treated by Metformin, Metformin hydrochloride, Lantus, Januvia, Glipizide ( latest reports from 291,118 Diabetes patients ) Paranoia (psychotic disorder characterized by delusions of persecution with or without grandeur) has been reported by people with depression, quit smoking, pain, stress and anxiety, schizophrenia ( latest reports from 15,270 Paranoia patients ). Analysis tools (to study 684 million drug outcomes from FDA) Ch Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advice - What It Feels Like To Have Low Blood Sugar -- Ask D'mine

Diabetes Advice - What It Feels Like To Have Low Blood Sugar -- Ask D'mine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Happy Saturday! Welcome to Ask D'Mine, our weekly advice column hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator W il Dubois . This week, Wil offers some thoughts on what seems like out-of-body moments we sometimes experience when those hypos occur. Ever happened to you? Read on to find out what the "hippocampus" might have to do with it... {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Ben, type 1 from Arkansas, writes: T1D for 18 years now and your articles are great. Luckily, Ivebeen pretty good and havent had too many issues, but... Over the past coupleyears, Ive been having delusions when my blood sugar gets low at night. I wakeup thinking I am billions of light years from wher e I reside, which isterrifying. I know my address, name, kids name, wifes name, how much I lovethem (which makes it even worse), SSN, blood type, 1+1=2, etc., etc., etc. But,I am convinced during these fantasyspells that nothing Im experiencing is real, and Im destined to be punishedif I dont get back to the place Im at billions of light years away from ASAP. Andgetting back is impossible. But, Ill try anything. A couple of weeks ago, I wokeup in this state, and ran about a mile naked while drinking honey. Its kind offunny, I mean, if I had been drinking alcohol or something. But, this is real life. Thesedelusions scare me like nothing Ive ever experienced. Ive done what I can to prevent them and from doing anythingstupid. I got a CGM. I gave away my guns. As soon as I recognize what ishappening, I tell my wife to lock me out of the house. But, Im a big boy andmy logical side has almost zero control of my bo Continue reading >>

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