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Diabetes On Campus

Guidelines About Diabetes

Guidelines About Diabetes

Diabetes is a disorder of the metabolism and is characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. People with diabetes must have a balance of food, exercise, and insulin to manage blood sugar levels. Many average daily occurrences can disrupt this balance, such as a lack of sleep or stress. When this balance is disrupted, certain emergency conditions including low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) or high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) may result. High or low blood sugars are most often not due to neglect on the diabetic's part. If the individual is conscious, ask how you can help. The person may need your assistance in obtaining a sweetened drink or orange juice. Stay with the individual during recovery or find someone who can. If blood sugar levels do not rise sufficiently, the individual may need help securing medical attention. If the individual has a form of insulin (injections, tablets, or infusion pump), and is coherent enough to measure the amount of insulin needed, you may offer assistance. If the individual does not seem able to do this, do not try to give them insulin yourself, you risk overcorrecting the problem and sending them directly into a low blood sugar. Individuals displaying these symptoms should be encouraged to seek immediate medical attention. These symptoms may also be indicators of undiagnosed diabetes. If you know someone who exhibits these warning signs, suggest the person see his/her doctor for screening. If the individual is unconscious (unresponsive to voice command or in obvious pain) call 9-911 on campus and 911 off campus. Provide the 911 dispatcher with the following information: The exact location (name of building, street, floor) Condition/nature of emergency (look for a medica Continue reading >>

College And Diabetes: On Campus And On Course

College And Diabetes: On Campus And On Course

Michael Levy sampled all that college life has to offer in his first year at Virginia Tech. In addition to taking six courses a semester, the engineering major and music minor marched on the VT drum line, rushed a fraternity, and took a ski trip with friends in the winter. Levy, now 19 and a rising sophomore, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in sixth grade. He says he's always strived to fit diabetes into his life rather than fit his life around diabetes. Still, he admits, the transition to college was a bigger adjustment than he expected. "It's a lot more work," he says. "The toughest change is not being on a rigorous schedule that you follow every day. If I want to, I can stay up until 4 o'clock in the morning playing video games." Since his daily routine is unpredictableit could end in a late-night study session or a party any night of the weekLevy has become more vigilant about keeping his blood glucose in a healthy range throughout the day. "I check about four or five times a day and correct often," he says. And he never leaves his dorm without a bag that contains his test kit, three juices, and an insulin pen. "Even if I go to a party, I have that bag with me," he says. "People joke with me about it, but I say, 'It's my man purse.' Just having it gives me that sense of security that if something does go wrong, I'm ready to handle it." Figuring out how to survive and thrive at college is a big job for any student who's living away from home for the first time, but it's particularly complicated for those with diabetes. Not only do they have to learn how to use the coin-operated washing machine and get along with eccentric roommates, but they also have to calculate carbs in cafeteria specials they've never seen before (what's in Tofu Surprise, anyway?), monitor ho Continue reading >>

Centre For Diabetes Care And Education

Centre For Diabetes Care And Education

The St. Josephs Healthcare Hamilton Centre for Diabetes Care and Education provides assessment, education, treatment and support for people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, and people that are at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Our goal is to provide tools and techniques to manage diabetes and live a healthy lifestyle. We are committed to ensuring that people with diabetes have all the resources and support they need to care for themselves with confidence. Diabetes programs are offered at both our West 5th Campus and King Campus locations. You will learn about what diabetes is and how to manage it and care for yourself. The program is set up to help you meet all your educational needs. We offer one-to-one teaching and group sessions. Meet with the nurse educator and dietitian, who are certified diabetes educators. Meetings are spread over several months to give you time to apply what you have learned. During these meetings you will receive information about blood sugar testing, medications, activity, meal planning, controlling stress and preventing potential problems. You will be able to talk about your concerns and ask questions. This class provides an overview of what diabetes is and helpful information about how to live a healthy life with diabetes. Recommended for people with type 2 diabetes who are newly diagnosed or want a refresher on current information. This class teaches you what carbohydrates are, what foods contain carbohydrates and in what amounts, and how to count carbohydrates to help you control your blood sugar. This class teaches you how to read food labels and know what to look for when you are food shopping. This class helps you learn how to protect your blood vessels and heart when you have diabetes. It also reminds you about the effects of fat and Continue reading >>

College Diabetes Network

College Diabetes Network

Letting go of your son or daughter who is away at college is difficult enough. And when he or she has type 1 diabetes the feelings of pride and hope are compounded by worries about their health and well-being. As a student, your child may experience mixed emotions of both excitement and fear about their independence. Not only are they faced with navigating through campus life, but they also must resolve issues related to their diabetes care. Discovering that there were no support services available to college students with diabetes spurred Christina Roth, then a junior at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, to create the College Diabetes Network in 2009. The College Diabetes Network (CDN) is a national non-profit organization founded to address the unique challenges facing college students with diabetes, from access to better health care and resources, to creating a community that understands and supports the disease. Christina says, I started a small group on the UMass campus to go beyond the usual student groups. There were so many issues for students with diabeteshousing, dining, and social activities. I wanted students to connect with other students like them to share how they dealt with diabetes. Today, there are more than 20 chapters at colleges and universities across the United States. CDN chapters provide a way for students to meet in person and connect, talk, laugh, and share the ups and downs about life with diabetes on campus. When asked about CDN, a student from Wellesley College stated, I was always open about having diabetes, but I never truly took responsibility of it until I met other type-1s on my campus. The bond we have was definitely the push I needed. My HbA1C dropped three full points since I met them last year. Meeting them changed my life. Continue reading >>

Original Research The Lived Experience Of Canadian University Students With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Original Research The Lived Experience Of Canadian University Students With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the lived experiences of university students with type 1 diabetes mellitus. University students participated in a 2-part focus group. Transcripts were analyzed thematically using an open-coding approach. Data analysis was guided by a framework analysis method and emergent themes were triangulated between study authors for validity. Three major themes identified in this study were food issues within the university environment, lack of diabetes awareness on campus and internal struggles related to the participants' relationships with their diabetes. Results illustrate some of the unique challenges that interfere with diabetes self-management, academic performance and quality of life among this sample of university students. Findings can provide insight for diabetes educators and other healthcare practitioners regarding the issues that may interfere with optimal diabetes self-care in this population. Findings also can be used to inform university administrators how to make the university environment more diabetes friendly for its students. Résumé Le but de cette étude était d’examiner les expériences vécues par les étudiants ayant le diabète sucré de type 1. Les étudiants ont participé à un groupe de discussion en 2 parties. Les transcriptions ont été analysées de façon thématique au moyen d’une approche à codage ouvert (open-coding). L’analyse des données a été guidée par la méthode de l’analyse du cadre et les thèmes émergents ont été triangulés avec les auteurs de l’étude pour en déterminer la validité. Les 3 thèmes majeurs qui ont été relevés dans cette étude étaient les enjeux alimentaires de l’environnement universitaire, le manque de sensibilisation au diabète sur le Continue reading >>

Diabtes Expo Set For March 24penn State York Students To Conduct Research At Diabetes Expo On Campus | Penn State University

Diabtes Expo Set For March 24penn State York Students To Conduct Research At Diabetes Expo On Campus | Penn State University

Amber Seidel, assistant professor of human development and family studies at Penn State York, center, works with Penn State York students Ashley Baskette, left, from York, Pennsylvania, and Jessica Popp, from Baltimore, Maryland, stuffing packets for the upcoming Diabetes Expo at Penn State York on March 24. The expo is sponsored by the Diabetes Coalition of York County, and students in the HD FS program will be conducting research during the event. Penn State York students to conduct research at Diabetes Expo on campus Free event to be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 24 in Main Classroom Building Penn State York students to conduct research at Diabetes Expo on campus YORK, Pa. Penn State York students in the human development and family studies program will be conducting self-report survey research during the Diabetes Expo that will be held on campus from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 24. The free event, open to the public, is sponsored by the Diabetes Coalition of York, and will be held in the conference center of the Main Classroom Building. This is the coalitions inaugural event, which they hope to continue annually. Under the direction of Amber Seidel, assistant professor of human development and family studies at Penn State York and a certified family life educator, 18 students are volunteering to assist with the research during the expo. Seidel, is a member of the Diabetes Coalition of York, includes research opportunities for students in her courses, so this event was the perfect opportunity to involve her in the expo. In each of my courses, I assign a service learning component of engaged scholarship that pushes them to see things differently, said Seidel. Last year students in my adulthood course (HD FS 445) assisted in grant writing with Embracing A Continue reading >>

Campus Group Offers Support To Students With Diabetes

Campus Group Offers Support To Students With Diabetes

Campus group offers support to students with diabetes Written by Patrick Burgard March 28, 2018 The Northeastern chapter of the College Diabetes Network is also open to students from nearby schools. / Photo courtesy College Diabetes Network As Northeastern students continue to advocate for improved health care services, a new student-led resource is available on campus for students with diabetes. The College Diabetes Network, or CDN, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating a support system for college-age students with Type 1 diabetes. It has more than 110 chapters in the United States and Canada, including Northeasterns, which became a recognized group on campus in November. The chapter was founded by co-presidents Alex Peterson, a fifth-year psychology major, and Maggie Gallagher, a third-year interactive media and business administration combined major. Both Maggie and I have Type 1 diabetes, Peterson said. We noticed that there was really not a place where we could connect with other people with Type 1, or seek out support if we needed advice or supplies, or how to navigate registering with the Disability Resource Center or how to get benefits and accomodations through classes. According to its website , CDN is run by and for students and has three pillars of programming: providing tools for students with Type 1 diabetes to live healthy lives, creating a support network for students with diabetes to interact and, lastly, establishing an ecosystem of resources and information for people who do not have diabetes to learn more. Its a way for students affected by Type 1 diabetes to connect with a support network, to advocate for one another, to promote education on their campuses, Peterson said. Its a pretty all-encompassing network of students affected by Ty Continue reading >>

Dining Reaches Out To Students With Diabetes

Dining Reaches Out To Students With Diabetes

Dining Reaches Out to Students With Diabetes Case Dining Hall manager Jaelyn Phelps serves a dish at last month's Blue Zones dinner geared toward students with diabetes and allergies. Photo courtesy of Eamon Queeney. From plain burgers and fries to spicy lentil curry, theres a dish for almost every palate at NC State Dining and, increasingly, for almost every dietary need. For the past few years, NC State Dining has been reaching out to students with Type 1 diabetes to help build a network in which students can support one another, find resources to manage their condition and remain healthy and well fed during their time at NC State. Some of the things were doing with allergies and especially with dietary needs with our students have really been unique among college and university food services, says Lisa Eberhart, a registered dietician and certified diabetes educator who serves as NC State Dinings director of nutrition and wellness. One of those efforts was a special meal last month geared toward students with diabetes and allergies. The Blue Zones dinner, named for regions of the world known for dietary health and high quality of life, comprised several dishes that balanced protein, fat and carbohydrates. About 30 students tried dishes such as bean salad and Ikarian-style roast chicken. More importantly, they learned about how to navigate menus at NC State, met fellow students with food restrictions and sampled different cuisines in a safe setting. Sometimes people with diabetes are scared to try different foods from other cultures because they are not sure what ingredients might be in those foods or how they might affect their blood sugars, says Jaelyn Phelps, a manager at Case Dining Hall who helped organize the dinner. This is one thing I wanted to tackle and ope Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Locations > LG Health Physicians > Diabetes > Diabetes & Endocrinology LG Health Physicians Diabetes & Endocrinology is totally focused on managing diabetes and other hormonal disorders. Our goal is to establish a positive relationship, beginning with your first appointment with us. We listen to your concerns and help you understand your management and treatment options so you can make the choices that best support your wellness goals. The endocrine system secretes chemical messengers called hormones, which travel through the bloodstream to various tissues or organs in the body. A problem with the hormone itself, its production, its movement through the body or its activity at the target tissue causes an endocrine disease. Endocrinology is the study of hormones and their related diseases. We use diagnostic tests, such as blood work and ultrasounds, to diagnose and monitor your condition. Since many of the conditions we treat are chronic, we will work with you on a long-term management plan to help minimize the impact of the disorder. Our physicians and certified nurse practitioners work closely together to coordinate all aspects of your care. Many of our patients have diabetes. We provide medical management, as appropriate. We offer nutritional counseling on site, and we work closely with the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Lancaster General Health so our patients have access to diabetes nutrition consultations and other services. Our patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes can also take advantage of valuable information from a trusted provider at the LG Health Diabetes Online Community , where youll find: Diabetes Dialogue with blog posts from our team members Diabetes Q&As , where our specialists answer your questions Delicious recipes and healthy eating tips Patient s Continue reading >>

5 Steps For Managing Diabetes On Campus

5 Steps For Managing Diabetes On Campus

Tips for making college a safe and healthy home away from home Well before you get to college, find a diabetes care team near campus. Your current pediatrician or endocrinologist may know of nearby doctors, nurses, and diabetes educators. Or reach out to your local American Diabetes Association office for referrals, says Paul Madden, MEd, the Associations director of type1 and type2 diabetes programs. Plan to get to know the folks at your campus health centerand make sure they get to know you, Madden says. Students, not their parents, should call ahead of their move to introduce themselves as someone with diabetes. Then, within a couple days of school starting, visit the health center and share information about your diabetes, such as medication and insulin dosages, and perhaps bring backup insulin vials or pens to store there. This serves two purposes, Madden says: If you run low on insulin in your dorm room, it may be easier to walk to the health center than get to a pharmacy. It also makes you a familiar face with your care team on campus. The people you live withroommates, resident advisers, and resident directorsshould know you have diabetes, says Christina Roth, CEO and founder of the College Diabetes Network, an online and in-person network of college students and alumni with diabetes. Its wise to teach your roommates to administer glucagon in an emergency. Alternatively, Madden suggests telling them, If I cant safely drink something sweetnot alcohol!please call the health center or 911. Help them understand (and remember) by printing and distributing diabetes information sheets and medical emergency cards . College might be a time for getting to know people romantically. For safetys sake, you should be able to talk to your potential partner about diabetes and w Continue reading >>

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

So youre making the huge transition from high school to college congratulations! College is awesome, but whether youve been recently diagnosed or have had diabetes for years, navigating college life with T1D will require extra precautions. As in grade school, your college is legally responsible for accommodating your T1D needs, but its your responsibility to make your T1D known and to request the assistance you deserve. Contact your schools Office of Disability Services As a student with T1D, you have a right to accommodations . As soon as you make your decision, contact your colleges Office of Disability Services to see what services they offer. Many colleges require that you provide a letter from your doctor that includesyour T1D diagnosis and a request for specific accommodations. Examples of special accommodations include: On campus housing and in-room accommodations, like refrigerators for insulin and snacks Campus meal plan, including nutritional information and access to dorms with cafeterias or accessibility to those near by Early class registration to ensure optimal schedule Notification to teaching staff of your T1D status Breaks during class and exams for self-care Ability to reschedule exams in cases of hypo/hyperglycemia Changes to classroom attendance policies to accommodate the potential for sudden hypo/hyperglycemia or diabetes-related illnesses Find more information on your rights as a college student with T1D HERE . FERPA (The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) gives parents certain rights with respect to their childrens education and medical records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18. If you want your parents to assist in any way with your medical care while you are at college, be sure to authorize acce Continue reading >>

Preparing Students With Diabetes For Life At College

Preparing Students With Diabetes For Life At College

Before matriculation Ideally, students with diabetes should meet with their primary care provider or endocrinologist before matriculating at an institute of higher education. Such a meeting enables the clinician to review all aspects of the student’s medical care (3) and to educate the student about some issues that they may not have already considered. Before leaving the prematriculation visit, the student should have a clear understanding of what relationship they will maintain with their home clinician’s office and should ask for copies of their medical records to take with them. Ideally, the student and the clinician should contact the college’s health facility to set up an introductory appointment for the student once they arrive on campus. Direct contact with the student health facility will also provide information regarding the level of service that can be provided so the student’s health care status is optimized. Before leaving for college, students need to ensure that they have all of the supplies needed to manage their diabetes while at school. Although most remember to take their blood glucose meter, monitoring strips, alcohol wipes, insulin syringes (or pump), and insulin, many will forget items that they can easily find at home (e.g., sharps container) or may not have considered (e.g., urine ketone test strips). Other items to pack include ready sources of glucose (such as small cans of juice and glucose tablets), glucose gel, Medic Alert identification, a copy of important contact phone numbers, and their insurance card. In addition, it is a good idea to assemble a medicine kit for use during times of illness. Such a kit should include a thermometer, nonperishable bland foods and liquids (such as Jell-O, Saltines, broth-based soups, juice, and sug Continue reading >>

The Comprehensive Guide To Dorm And Campus Life With Diabetes

The Comprehensive Guide To Dorm And Campus Life With Diabetes

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 2 Comments Are you going off to college to get your first taste of independence and semi-adulting? Perhaps you have already been at college for a month or so. How are you managing your diabetes? Are/were you equipped for all of the challenges that come with leaving home and starting a new chapter of your life? Did you know there would be so many parties? Each year, about 2.3 million freshmen enroll in institutes of higher education in the U.S. About 7,700 of these freshmen, based on the current prevalence, have Type 1 diabetes1. These students, in addition to adjusting to dorm and campus life, do not have the support of their parents and/or someone that can remind them when they need to self-manage their diabetes. They are faced with many choices, some of which may be dangerous for them. There are extra challenges and responsibilities to think of as a college student with diabetes. Sofias concern, when she contacted the diabetes council, was exactly this. As a college freshman at the University of Maryland, she was having trouble managing her diabetes, along with her hectic schedule. She wanted to get some help learning how to manage life in college with diabetes. She wanted to be successful in college, so that she could pursue a career in the medical field. Being the parent of a college student with diabetes I am currently the parent of a rising sophomore at Appalachian State University. It was not so long ago when we drove her up the mountain, two cars loaded down, headed for Boone, NC with the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains as the backdrop. Tensions were high. Excitement was high too. She and I were venturing high up the mountain diving into the unknown. I had a whole list of worries back then. I still have a long list of things t Continue reading >>

Diabetes On The College Campus.

Diabetes On The College Campus.

Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University-Kalamazoo Center for Medical Studies, 1000 Oakland Drive, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-1284, USA. [email protected] Pediatr Clin North Am. 2005 Feb;52(1):279-305, xi. The college campus presents a unique scenario where older adolescents and young adults find themselves in an independent environment. The students with pre-existing diabetes face immense responsibility regarding their diabetes care and decision making, without the immediate presence of their parents and the pediatric diabetes team. In addition, there are many other students who may be faced with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus first identified in college. Current diabetes management strategies offer comprehensive care, which results in improved glycemic control and near-normal lifestyle. Continued effort at comprehensive diabetes education goes a long way toward giving these students healthy lives. This article reviews issues involving care of college students with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Campus Chapters | College Diabetes Network

Campus Chapters | College Diabetes Network

We have a ton of resources to help you get started - from finding interested members on your campus and registering as an official student organization, to hosting events and activities. CDN Chapters get access to our Start Up Guide, a budget to build your own Outreach Kit through our online Campus Store , a CDN email address for your Chapter, a Chapter webpage on our website, constitution templates, resources for faculty advisors, tips on how to find your members, an Activity Guide with meeting and event ideas from CDN students themselves, connections to speakers and community partners, and of course, the personal support of our dedicated Program Staff! Each year, CDN student leaders from across the country come together for the CDN Annual Retreat in Bridgton, Maine. Students spend time learning, networking, and growing as leaders throughout the course of the retreat. The 2018 CDN Annual Retreat will be held from May 21-25, 2018. Former attendees have written some great blogs about theirexperiencesat the Retreat. Check out Hannah's blog and Courtney's blog to learn more. CDN created a Student Advisory Committee (SAC) in 2013 to serve as the voice of the student population and to help the CDN team to identify key areas of student and Chapter programming. SAC members work closely with CDN National staff to gain real-world professional experience in the nonprofit sector, contribute to CDN's mission through virtual internships, and provide feeback and support for CDN programs. To learn more, email us ! We have resources for Faculty Advisors, too - check out our Campus Administration webpage! If you aren't currently an advisor but want to be, check if there's a Chapter at your school using the map above. No Chapter? You can help get the word out about CDN to students at yo Continue reading >>

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