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Diabetes Nutrition Guidelines 2017

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips for Using the Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner and Grocery List by The Diabetes Food Hub Team The all-new interactive Meal Planner and Grocery List features on Diabetes Food Hub make planning meals, tracking nutrition, and shopping for groceries a breeze. To make sure youre getting the most out of these features, try these easy-to-follow tips. First things firstif you have not done so already, create your free account with Diabetes Food Hub. Not only will creating an account let you save recipes, create a profile, and enjoy a more personalized experience on the site, but access to the Meal Planner and Grocery List features requires an account. If you have ever donated to the ADA or volunteered for Step Out or Tour de Cure, you probably have an account with the ADA already and can use that user name and password. Simply log in to the site! If you do not have a username and password, setting up an account is easy. Click on the Menu button in the upper right corner and select Log In from the listed options. When the Log In box appears, click on register here at the bottom of the box. Follow the instructions and fill out the necessary informationyoure all set! The Meal Planner uses recipes youve saved to your Recipe Box for building and planning meals. So be sure to save plenty of recipes in order to have a good selection in the Meal Planner . You can save recipes by clicking the star icon on recipes. You can then view these recipes in your Recipe Box . Be sure to save different types of recipes, such as sides, breakfasts, lunches, and main dishes, so you can build complete meals that meet your nutrition needs. Now that youve saved some recipes, its time to start building! Your saved recipes will show up to the right of the interactive Meal Planner . (If want to use rec Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

What To Know About The Ada's 2018 Standards Of Medical Care If You Have Diabetes

What To Know About The Ada's 2018 Standards Of Medical Care If You Have Diabetes

Living with poorly controlled blood sugar levels may lead to potentially serious health complications for people with diabetes — including diabetic neuropathy, diabetic retinopathy, amputations, depression, sexual issues, heart disease, stroke, and even death. But luckily, if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, managing your diet, lifestyle, and treatment well can help you stabilize blood sugar and ultimately reduce the risk of these potential future health issues. To do this, it’s crucial to stay up to date on current treatment standards in the United States — and that starts with turning to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), which releases its Standards of Medical Care each year. What Are the ADA Standards of Care and Why Should You Care? In the ADA’s latest guidelines, released online in December 2017, the organization lists updates in areas related to heart disease and diabetes, new health technology, and more. The standards reflect the latest evidence available to help improve care and health outcomes in people with diabetes, says William T. Cefalu, MD, the chief scientific, medical, and mission officer at the ADA who is based in New Orleans, Louisiana. “The new evidence that has been available this year from published work has been incredible,” Dr. Cefalu says. Although the Standards of Medical Care are primarily geared toward the healthcare community, your diabetes management can benefit if you know about them, says Robert A. Gabbay, MD, PhD, the chief medical officer of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Following is everything you need to know about the new guidelines if you or a family member has type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, or gestational diabetes. What the 2018 ADA Standards of Medical Care Say Here are some of the major changes and Continue reading >>

Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes Management

Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes Management

If you have diabetes, it is important to eat well to help keep yourself healthy. Nutrition care should be personalized for each person based on blood glucose (sugar) level, blood lipid (fat) levels, risk factors for heart disease and high blood pressure, exercise habits, and food preferences. For most people, general guidelines for diabetes are as follows: Aim to maintain a healthy weight Exercise moderately for about 30 minutes at least five times per week Get your carbohydrates mainly from fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and low-fat or skim dairy products Limit saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol Do not use low-carbohydrate diets to control diabetes Weight If you currently have prediabetes, controlling your weight can help prevent you from getting type 2 diabetes. If you already have diabetes, controlling your weight can help you improve your blood sugar levels. A healthy eating pattern, combined with regular physical activity, can help people who are overweight lose weight and keep it off. Frequently, this will also lead to improvements in blood lipid levels. Diets for weight loss Individuals must find a healthy eating pattern that they can continue for a lifetime in order to successfully achieve weight loss and weight maintenance. No best diet exists because different things work for different people. However, changing eating and exercise behaviors is essential for successful weight loss. To lose weight, a deficit (decrease) of approximately 500 calories per day is generally recommended. A combination of eating and drinking fewer calories, and burning more calories through physical activity can create this deficit, and help you lose weight. Generally, about 1 hour per day of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, along Continue reading >>

Cystic Fibrosis-related Diabetes Clinical Care Guidelines

Cystic Fibrosis-related Diabetes Clinical Care Guidelines

Clinical Care Guidelines for Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes: Executive Summary Clinical Care Guidelines for Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes: a position statement of the American Diabetes Association and a clinical practice guideline of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, endorsed by the Pediatric Endocrine Society. Diabetes Care. 2010;33(12):2697-2708. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common comorbidity in cystic fibrosis and occurs in up to 20 percent of adolescents and 50 percent of adults with CF. A diagnosis of CFRD has a negative impact on lung function, nutrition, and survival. As early CFRD may be clinically silent, these guidelines highlight the importance of regular screening in various clinical contexts. A diagnosis of CFRD is made based on standard American Diabetes Association criteria, but may also be made after detection of intermittent hyperglycemia during illness or gastrostomy feedings. Management recommendations focus on insulin therapy and ongoing care provided by a multidisciplinary team with knowledge of CF and diabetes. Methodology The latest Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes (CFRD) Clinical Care Guidelines from 2010 summarize screening, diagnosis and management recommendations resulting from a joint collaboration of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Pediatric Endocrine Society. The report references the ADA Standards of Medical Care, published annually in Diabetes Care for all people with diabetes, but focuses on aspects unique to the care of CFRD. The process for developing these guidelines included an: expert committee, specific questions, systematic literature review, recommendations drafted, committee vote, final recommendations, and grade (US Preventative Task Force [USPSTF] and ADA S Continue reading >>

Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes2017 Abridged For Primary Care Providers

Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes2017 Abridged For Primary Care Providers

Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes2017 Abridged for Primary Care Providers Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2017 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The American Diabetes Associations (ADAs) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes is updated and published annually in a supplement to the January issue of Diabetes Care. The ADAs Professional Practice Committee, comprised of physicians, diabetes educators, registered dietitians, and public health experts, develops the Standards. Formerly called Clinical Practice Recommendations, the Standards includes the most current evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing and treating adults and children with all forms of diabetes. ADAs grading system uses A, B, C, or E to show the evidence level that supports each recommendation. AClear evidence from well-conducted, generalizable randomized controlled trials that are adequately powered BSupportive evidence from well-conducted cohort studies CSupportive evidence from poorly controlled or uncontrolled studies EExpert consensus or clinical experience This is an abridged version of the current Standards containing the evidence-based recommendations most pertinent to primary care. The tables and figures have been renumbered from the original document to match this version. The complete 2017 Standards of Care document, including all supporting references, is available at professional.diabetes.org/standards . PROMOTING HEALTH AND REDUCING DISPARITIES IN POPULATIONS Treatment plans should align with the Chronic Care Model, emphasizing productive interactio Continue reading >>

Tailoring Treatment To Reduce Disparities:

Tailoring Treatment To Reduce Disparities:

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) publishes the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes annually, based on the latest medical research. The following narrative provides a summary of the 2017 updated recommendations that have been developed for clinical practice. The ADA guidelines are not intended to aid or preclude clinical judgment. The full guidelines can be accessed at ADA’s Diabetes Pro website. Tailoring Treatment to Reduce Disparities: Updated guidelines focus on improving outcomes and reducing disparities in populations with diabetes such as: Ethnic/Cultural/Sex/Socioeconomic Differences and Disparities: Provide structured interventions that are tailored to ethnic populations and integrate culture, language, religion, and literacy skills. Food Insecurity: Evaluate hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in the context of food insecurity (FI), which is defined as the unreliable availability of nutritious food. Recognize that homelessness and poor literacy and numeracy often occur with FI. Propose solutions and resources accordingly. Comprehensive Medical Evaluation and Assessment of Comorbidities: The clinical evaluation should include conversation about lifestyle modifications and healthy living. PAs should address barriers including patient factors (e.g., remembering to obtain or take medications, fears, depression, and health beliefs), medication factors (e.g., complex directions, cost) and system factors (e.g., inadequate follow up). Simplifying treatment regimens may improve adherence. This section highlights the elements of a patient-centered comprehensive medical exam, including the importance of assessing comorbidities such as: Cognitive Dysfunction: Tailor glycemic therapy to avoid significant hypoglycemia. Cardiovascular benefits of statin therapy outweigh Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

4. Lifestyle Management

4. Lifestyle Management

Lifestyle management is a fundamental aspect of diabetes care and includes diabetes self-management education (DSME), diabetes self-management support (DSMS), nutrition therapy, physical activity, smoking cessation counseling, and psychosocial care. Patients and care providers should focus together on how to optimize lifestyle from the time of the initial comprehensive medical evaluation, throughout all subsequent evaluations and follow-up, and during the assessment of complications and management of comorbid conditions in order to enhance diabetes care. DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT EDUCATION AND SUPPORT Recommendations In accordance with the national standards for diabetes self-management education and support, all people with diabetes should participate in diabetes self-management education to facilitate the knowledge, skills, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care and in diabetes self-management support to assist with implementing and sustaining skills and behaviors needed for ongoing self-management, both at diagnosis and as needed thereafter. B Effective self-management and improved clinical outcomes, health status, and quality of life are key goals of diabetes self-management education and support that should be measured and monitored as part of routine care. C Diabetes self-management education and support should be patient centered, respectful, and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and should help guide clinical decisions. A Diabetes self-management education and support programs have the necessary elements in their curricula to delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes self-management education and support programs should therefore be able to tailor their content when prevention of diabetes is the desired goal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Source: American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes—2016. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(suppl 1):S1-S106. Available here. Refer to source document for full recommendations, including class of recommendation and level of evidence. Jump to a topic or click back/next at the bottom of each page Lifestyle Changes Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) The ADA acknowledges that there is no one-size-fits-all eating pattern for individuals with type 2 diabetes. MNT is recommended for all individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes as part of an overall treatment plan, preferably provided by a registered dietitian skilled in diabetes MNT Goals of MNT: A healthful eating pattern to improve overall health, specifically: Achievement and maintenance of weight goals Attainment of individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Type 2 diabetes prevention or delay Attain individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Achieve and maintain body weight goals Delay or prevent diabetes complications Nutrition guidelines from the ADA are available. Click here for summary recommendations on coordinating foods with diabetes medications, eating patterns, and more. Physical Activity Adults with diabetes Exercise programs should include ≥150 min/wk moderate-intensity aerobic activity (50%-70% max heart rate), spread over ≥3 days/wk with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise Resistance training ≥2 times/wk (in absence of contraindications)* Reduce sedentary time = break up >90 minutes spent sitting Evaluate patients for contraindications prohibiting certain types of exercise before recommending exercise program† Consider age and previous level of physical activity Children with diabetes, prediabetes ≥60 min physical activity/day *Adults with typ Continue reading >>

Updated Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Guidelines

Updated Type 1 Diabetes Treatment Guidelines

This article requires a subscription for full access. NEJM Journal Watch articles published within the last six months are available to subscribers only. Articles published more than 6 months ago are available to registered users. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet Guidelines

Diabetic Diet Guidelines

Tips to keep your blood sugar in check and help prevent diabetes. Nearly 21 million Americans have diabetes and one-third of these people dont even know it. Whats more, an additional 54 million people in the U.S. have blood-glucose levels that fall into a risky prediabetes range. Basically, diabetes is a health condition characterized by high levels of glucose a form of sugar that fuels our bodys cellsin the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucosebut the sugar cant get into cells without an escort. Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, ushers the sugar in. But in people who have diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas dont make enough insulin ( type 1 diabetes ), or the bodys cells dont respond effectively to the hormone ( type 2 diabetes ). The result: glucose stays in the blood, where it accumulates. Over time, this high concentration of blood glucosea condition called hyperglycemiaweakens blood vessels and then can damage the eyes, kidneys and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease and stroke. The root cause for the diabetes epidemic still eludes medical researchers but most experts agree that poor diet and sedentary living are significant contributing factors. The upside of this is that eating well and moving more helps prevent the conditioneven if your blood glucose level is already in whats considered to be a pre-diabetes range. (And if you have diabetes already, a healthy diet helps keep glucose levels in check.) The nutrition experts at EatingWell recommend the following steps to help control blood glucose and prevent diabetes. Extra fat can make your body resistant to the action of insulin. Losing weight improves insulins activity, which reduces blood-glucose levels. Research suggests that people at high risk for diabetes who Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Guide To Nutrition Therapy For Diabetes, 3rd Edition

American Diabetes Association Guide To Nutrition Therapy For Diabetes, 3rd Edition

American Diabetes Association Guide to Nutrition Therapy for Diabetes, 3rd Edition Marion J. Franz, MS, RDN, CDE, and Alison B. Evert, MS, RDN, CDE For positive, cost-effective outcomes, few other treatments compare to nutrition therapy. From macro- and micronutrients to methods of intervention among different patient groups, this guide provides a comprehensive evidence-based foundation. Nutrition therapy is an essential component of effective diabetes management. Healthcare providers need to stay current on new developments in nutrition therapy and specific interventions for a wide range of patient populations and special circumstances in order to provide the best possible outcomes for their patients. Revised and updated to incorporate the latest research and evidence-based guidelines, the third edition of the American Diabetes Association Guide to Nutrition Therapy for Diabetes is a comprehensiveresource for the successful implementation of nutrition therapy for people with diabetes. Nutrition therapy for pregnant women, youth, older adults, andpeople with prediabetes Nutrition therapy for hospitalized and long-term care patients Celiac disease, eating disorders, and diabetes complications Cost-effectiveness of nutrition therapy, health literacy and numeracy, and community-based diabetes prevention programs Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Abstract Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2017 Standards of Care, the ADA Professional Practice Committee did MEDLINE searches from 1 January 2016 to November 2016 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations on the basis of new evidence. The committee rated the recommendations as A, B, or C, depending on the quality of evidence, or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The Standards of Care were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendation: This synopsis focuses on recommendations from the 2017 Standards of Care about monitoring and pharmacologic approaches to glycemic management for type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) first released its practice guidelines for health professionals in 1989. The Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes have since provided an extensive set of evidence-based recommendations that are updated annually for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. The 2017 Standards of Care cover all aspects of patient care (1); this guideline synopsis focuses on monitoring and pharmacologic approaches for patients with type 1 diabetes. Guideline Development and Evidence Grading Monitoring Glycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Glycemic Goals: Recommendations Pharmacologic Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes: Recommendations Continue reading >>

Idf Clinical Practice Recommendations For Managing Type 2 Diabetes In Primary Care

Idf Clinical Practice Recommendations For Managing Type 2 Diabetes In Primary Care

IDF Clinical Practice Recommendations for managing Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Care - 2017 2 IDF Working Group Chair: Pablo Aschner, MD,MSc, Javeriana University and San Ignacio University Hospital, Bogota, Colombia. Core Contributors: Amanda Adler, MD, PhD, FRCP, Addenbrooke´s Hospital and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence(NICE), Cambridge, UK Cliff Bailey, PhD, FRCP(Edin), FRCPath, Aston University, Birmingham,UK Juliana CN Chan, MB ChB, MD, MRCP (UK), FRCP (Lond), FRCP (Edin), FRCP (Glasgow), FHKAM (Medicine), Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, China. Stephen Colagiuri, MB, BS Honours Class II, FRACP, The Boden Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Caroline Day, PhD, FRSB, MedEd UK and Aston University, Birmingham, UK Juan Jose Gagliardino, MD, Cenexa (Unlp-Conicet), La Plata, Argentina Lawrence A. Leiter, MD, FRCPC, FACP, FACE, FAHA, Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute at St. Michael’s Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Shaukat Sadikot, MD, President International Diabetes Federation (2016-2017), Diabetes India and Jaslok Hospital, Mumbai, India Nam Han Cho, MD, PhD, President-Elect International Diabetes Federation (2016-17), Department of Preventive Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea Eugene Sobngwi, MD, MPhil, PhD, Central Hospital and University of Yaounde, Yaounde, Cameroon Acknowledgements Milena Garcia, MD, MSc, Javeriana University and San Ignacio University Hospital, Bogota, Colombia. Co-chaired the consensus meeting and contributed to the appraisal of the guidelines Chris Parkin - Medical writing support, CGParkin Communications, USA Martine V Continue reading >>

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