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Diabetes Nursing Salary

Diabetes Nurse | Nursing Schools.net

Diabetes Nurse | Nursing Schools.net

Diabetes nurses care for patients that suffer from diabetes, a condition that affects the body's ability to produce or absorb enough insulin. This includes assisting patients in monitoring their blood sugar and medications, helping to minimize diabetic nerve damage, conducting nutritional therapy, dealing with psychosocial issues and behavioral management. They also spend a considerable amount of time educating patients and families on proper dietary, exercise and lifestyle habits to keep symptoms under control. These nurses also have a specialized knowledge of the endocrine system, including the hypothalamus, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, pineal body and the reproductive glands. Diabetes nurses must possess excellent communication skills in order to relay information between patients, physicians, family members and even insurance companies. They must also be compassionate as they are dealing with a disease that is often chronic and can be life threatening. Many diabetes nurses become advocates for diabetes awareness and even go on to become diabetes educators. Becoming a diabetes nurse requires both education and experience. First a student must become a registered nurse via either a two year associate's or four year bachelor's degree. Then students must take and successfully pass the National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX-RN) to become a registered nurse. Many facilities also require diabetes nurses to become certified as advanced diabetes specialists. In order to become eligible for the certification exam, nurses must possess a master's level degree and a minimum of 500 hours of professional nursing experience in a diabetes setting. This exam is called the Advanced Diabetes Management Certification and is administered via the American Association of Diabete Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde) Salary

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde) Salary

Job Description for Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) As the name implies, certified diabetes educator (CDE) is a position with specific certification requirements. In addition to being a certified diabetic specialist, many positions have further requirements. Common requirements include being a registered nurse (RN), Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) certifications, a bachelor's or master's degree in nursing, a bachelor's or master's degree in nutrition, or other related training. In some cases, these requirements are mandatory before applying, while some employers will provide employees with the opportunity to complete these requirements during their first few years of work. The CDE educates patients on dietary needs and general health. This may include specific diets aimed to treat medical conditions or diets geared towards general well being to prevent disease. Planning diets and following up with patients to ensure motivation and dedication are a part of the job. They must also serve as a general community resource . This includes regularly communicating with patients, providing educational materials to those interested, and keeping records of all patient interaction. General skills required in this position include communication, computer, and organizational skills; all of these help employee effectively share knowledge of diet and nutrition with patients. The work environment is indoors, typically in an office or hospital setting, while work hours are limited to general business operating hours. Risks and physical requirements are generally limited to basic office tasks. (Copyright 2017 PayScale.com) Assess nutritional needs, diet restrictions and current health plans to develop and implement dietary-care plans and provide nutritional counseling. Educate Continue reading >>

20 Best Travel Nurse Diabetes Jobs (hiring Now!) | Simply Hired

20 Best Travel Nurse Diabetes Jobs (hiring Now!) | Simply Hired

Territory Manager, Diabetes Connected Care - Cleveland, OH DIABETES BUSINESS DESCRIPTION:. Assist in establishing the company as the leader in diabetes products in the community by participating in community... Please note that all salary figures are approximations based upon third party submissions to SimplyHired or its affiliates. These figures are given to the SimplyHired users for the purpose of generalized comparison only. Minimum wage may differ by jurisdiction and you should consult the employer for actual salary figures. Territory Manager, Diabetes Connected Care - Baltimore, MD DIABETES BUSINESS DESCRIPTION:. Assist in establishing the company as the leader in diabetes products in the community by participating in community... Please note that all salary figures are approximations based upon third party submissions to SimplyHired or its affiliates. These figures are given to the SimplyHired users for the purpose of generalized comparison only. Minimum wage may differ by jurisdiction and you should consult the employer for actual salary figures. Territory Manager, Diabetes Connected Care - Boston, MA DIABETES BUSINESS DESCRIPTION:. Assist in establishing the company as the leader in diabetes products in the community by participating in community... Please note that all salary figures are approximations based upon third party submissions to SimplyHired or its affiliates. These figures are given to the SimplyHired users for the purpose of generalized comparison only. Minimum wage may differ by jurisdiction and you should consult the employer for actual salary figures. Territory Manager, Diabetes Connected Care - Chicago, IL DIABETES BUSINESS DESCRIPTION:. Assist in establishing the company as the leader in diabetes products in the community by participating in c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Nursing

Diabetes Management Nursing

Diabetes is a growing health problem in the United States. Diabetes management nurses (DMNs) are now in high demand. As a certified diabetes educator (CDE), you are the nurse who educates patients, helping others make positive lifestyle modifications to manage this difficult condition. Education Requirements for Diabetes Management Nursing The first step toward a career as a diabetes management nursing caregiver is the licensed practical nurse (LPN) certificate nursing program. This allows you to further your education by pursuing an Associates Degree in Nursing (ADN) or a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. Both of these degrees allow you to take the National Certification Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and use the title of RN. RN nursing school is anywhere from two to four years in length. Once you finish up with those programs, you can go on to earn a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) and work as an advanced practice nurse (APN) or clinical nurse specialist (CNS). The possibilities are endless in this profession.9 A CDE is a RN who specializes in caring for patients with diabetes mellitus and helping them manage the condition. They offer routine examinations, monitor the patients health status, and record information for the patients doctor to review. Because a CDE is a RN with advanced knowledge, she or he often uses the term diabetes nurse educator. The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) provides certification for RNs who pursue this specialty. Certification is not legally required for a nurse to educate a patient about diabetes, but it shows that you have additional knowledge and ability to do this job. Before applying for certification, you must have a minimum of two years of nursing experience and over 1,000 hour Continue reading >>

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

How do I become a diabetes educator? One must be a healthcare professional who has a defined role as a diabetes educator, not for those who may perform some diabetes related functions as part of or in the course of other usual and customary duties. Practice as a diabetes educator means actively employed for compensation, providing a direct or indirect professional contribution to the care and self-management education of people with diabetes. Diabetes education, also referred to as diabetes self-management education or diabetes self-management training, is performed by health care professionals who have appropriate credentials and experience consistent with the particular profession's scope of practice. Diabetes self-management education is defined as the interactive, collaborative, ongoing process involving the person with diabetes or pre-diabetes and/or the caregivers and the educator(s). The process includes: Assessment of the individual's specific education needs Identification of the individual's specific diabetes self-management goals Education and behavioral intervention directed toward helping the individual achieve identified self-management goals Evaluation(s) of the individual's attainment of identified self-management goals Proper documentation of all education encounters Diabetes educators can be found in a variety of settings: hospitals, physician offices, clinics, home health, wellness programs, to name a few. They most often work within accredited or recognized diabetes education programs. This means that the diabetes education program has met requirements set forth by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and can bill for diabetes self-management training through two different codes: G0108 and G0109, which are for individual and group diabetes ed Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nurse Salary And Career Advice | Chegg Careermatch

Diabetes Nurse Salary And Career Advice | Chegg Careermatch

Work with patients whose bodies do not produce enough insulin. Diabetes is a disease in which the body fails to produce the proper amount of insulin. Common conditions that arise from the disease involve nearly every organ in the body. Because of the sharp increase in case numbers over the last several decades, caring for diabetes has become big business. Diabetes Nurse Practitioners , Family Practice Physician, and Diabetes Nurses confront the daily challenge of treating patients who suffer from this debilitating disease. As a Diabetes Nurse, you might work in an outpatient environment, where patients check in for periodic visits. You take blood samples and run tests to monitor blood sugar levels. In addition, you ask questions about the patients eating, exercise, and other health habits. Because you work as a liaison between the Doctor or Nurse Practitioner and the patient, you keep careful records of all conversations, medications, test results, and procedures. Some patients require more intensive care, so you use your Diabetes Nurse skills when they enter the hospital, seek short-term intensive stabilization, or are in the terminal stages of the disease. At every stage in the process, you offer support and a nurturing spirit. Sometimes, that requires playing the role of Counselor. Other times, you act as Caregiver , ensuring they take their medicine, make good choices about their diet, and anything else that can help them monitor, manage, prevent, stabilize, or improve the symptoms of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nurse Practitioner: Salary, Role & Job Description

Diabetes Nurse Practitioner: Salary, Role & Job Description

Diabetes Nurse Practitioner: Salary, Role & Job Description Diabetes nurse practitioners are advanced practice nurses who work with diabetes patients to improve the patients' health. They assume the role of both nurse and patient educator. Find schools that offer these popular programs Nurse Assistant or Patient Care Assistant Nurse Practitioner or Family Nurse Practitioner Diabetes nurse practitioners (NPs) collaborate with other healthcare professionals, including endocrinologists, patient educators, dietitians and health care social workers, to help diabetic patients improve and maintain their health. Diabetes NPs examine, interview and diagnose patients; order lab tests; and prescribe treatments. They manage insulin therapies and infusions, monitor patients' glucose levels and help educate patients about their conditions. Diabetes NPs might work in hospitals or outpatient offices. Though much of their work is collaborative, their interactions with patients generally are one-on-one. Basic Life Support/Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support certified, critical-thinking skills, knowledge of medical equipment and terminology, electronic medical records training, ability to work in a team, strong written and verbal communication skills, self-direction, initiation skills 31% (for nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives and nurse practitioners) Sources: *PayScale, **U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics A Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) is the minimum level of education for prospective diabetes nurse practitioners. Some programs offer a specialty or coursework in endocrinology that could benefit future diabetes NPs. Students also might opt to pursue a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) for advanced studies. Diabetes nurse practitioners must be licensed as NPs in the state where they' Continue reading >>

Msn: Diabetes Nursing Programs

Msn: Diabetes Nursing Programs

Masters Of Nursing College Grants and Scholarships Diabetes nursing programs allow students to develop the advanced skills and knowledge that is needed to confront the growing number of diabetes cases. This program prepares students to lead, consult, and educate in diabetes treatment and prevention. This is a way for RNs to expand upon their education and to develop a masters degree with a specialization in helping diabetes patients. Requirements for Earning an MSN: Diabetes Nursing Degree The course work focuses on both theories and evidence-based practices to care for the special needs of individuals and vulnerable populations with diabetes. Through a multidisciplinary approach, students address diabetes issues through strategic collaboration with leaders across public administration, public safety, and heath care fields. The curriculum combines core courses with specialization courses including professional nursing practices, advanced nursing leadership and management, diabetes pathophysiology and assessment, and evidence-based education, and outcomes for diabetes care. Diabetes nurse specialists can find employment in the public and private sectors working in hospitals, healthcare centers, outpatient clinics, and assisted living facilities. This is a rapidly growing profession that provides ample opportunities for advancement within the profession. Salary data for this niche is not broken down in The Bureau of Labor Statistics occupational outlook handbook, but general salary information for nurses can be found at their website . Job Duties of a Diabetes Nurse Specialist As a diabetes specialist your role includes educating patients and their families about the disease and its risks, monitoring blood sugar intake, and developing nutritional and exercise plans with Continue reading >>

Nurses Participating In Research To Improve Diabetes Care

Nurses Participating In Research To Improve Diabetes Care

Nurses participating in research to improve diabetes care From coast to coast, nurses are participating in or conducting research that may change the way they and their colleagues care for patients with diabetes. [My job] is fantastic, said Terry Zierenberg, RN, CDE, a diabetes nurse educator at the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. We can see the difference we make in the lives of people with diabetes. Zierenberg works on the islet cell transplant program, evaluating candidates self-management skills and qualifications to participate in the study and helping coordinate blood glucose management after transplant. My role is to assess that we have exhausted all measures in attempting to control [the candidates], Zierenberg said. Trial participants, who have severe type 1 diabetes and frequent hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia unawareness, receive islet cells from the pancreas of a deceased donor through the hepatic circulation and the anti-rejection medication anti-thymocyte globulin. Participants can receive up to three transplants. Patients continue to self-manage their disease and will initially receive small doses of insulin and then are weaned off of it. City of Hope will follow them for five years. Some participants in prior islet cell trials at the institute have been followed for 10 years, including one woman whose islets are becoming exhausted. She is now waiting to start the new trial. While Fouad Kandeel, MD, PhD, said in a release that islet cells may provide a cure for type 1 diabetes, Zierenberg said, the goal of islet transplantation is to get rid of the dangerously and potentially life-threatening hypoglycemic events that occur. She also indicated a goal is to manage patients with islet cells but no immunosuppression. Z Continue reading >>

A Closer Look At Nurses' Salaries

A Closer Look At Nurses' Salaries

Here's a summary of the results of Nursing2006's seventh annual nationwide survey. See how your salary compares to that of colleagues across the country in this summary of Nursing2006's annual salary survey. Cheryl L. Mee is editor-in-chief of Nursing2006 and adjunct faculty for Immaculata (Pa.) University. OVER 1,100 NURSES responded to the salary survey published in the January issue of Nursing2006. Managers reported an average salary of $62,800. Advanced practice nurses reported an average annual salary of $69,600. Nurses in salaried positions made an average of $10,000 more per year than those paid by the hour. Salaries flatten when nurses are in a position for more than 10 years. Nurses working in the same position for 11 to 15 years report a salary of $56,000; those holding their positions for over 15 years made $56,700. As in previous years, men in nursing made more money than women. The average salary for all male respondents was $54,600, compared with $50,600 for womenan 8% difference. Looking at RNs specifically, the gender gap was about 6%. But for LPNs, the gap was even wider: 16%. Among all nurses, those who reported being certified in a specialty made $9,200 more annually than nurses who weren't certified. With one exception, compensation also increased with advances in education, as indicated by these average annual salaries: The high annual salary for diploma RNs is consistent with our findings from previous surveys. The most likely reason is that on average, diploma RNs have been in the profession longer than other RNs. Continue reading >>

50 Best Paying Nursing Specialties

50 Best Paying Nursing Specialties

We all have an image of the nurse at the bedside of a patient, administering medications, adjusting IVs and maybe even fluffing a pillow and straightening a blanket; but, that’s an old fashioned view of the nursing profession. Over the past twenty years, roles and opportunities for those in the nursing field have vastly expanded. According to the American Nurses Association, there is an annual growth of 100,000 nursing positions expected through 2022, making nursing the fastest growing profession in the U.S. Even more startling is the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) estimate that there will be the need for 1.1 million new Registered Nurses required to avoid a shortage. Nearly 500,000 nurses are anticipated to retire over the next ten years; and, the number of patients is expected to increase, more people joining the insured rolls of the Affordable Care Act and aging Baby Boomers straining the U.S. healthcare system. Recommended Online Nursing Programs There was a time that the field of nursing was limited to direct patient care; but, as technology advances, intensive research in quality patient care has increased, hospital and medical facilities have enhanced services and registered nurses are at the forefront of new careers and subspecialties. Best Medical Degrees has developed a ranking of the 50 best paying nursing careers based on information provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. News and World Report and the American Nursing Association. The Bureau of Labor Statistics often doesn’t distinguish specialties in nursing. Where the BLS does not cite a salary for a specific nursing path (i.e., Flight Nurse, Transplant Nurse, etc.) salary estimates have been reviewed from salary survey sources such as Indeed.com and the American Nursing Association Continue reading >>

31 Best Specialty Career Choices For Nurses

31 Best Specialty Career Choices For Nurses

Home / Nursing Articles / 31 Best Specialty Career Choices For Nurses 31 Best Specialty Career Choices For Nurses These 31 nursing careers were selected due to their impressive salary, work setting, and high demand, if youre searching for a career in nursing, this list may help you discover the route thats right for you. *All salary data is sourced from Indeed.com One of the fastest growing specialties, a certified dialysis nurse assists individuals who have severe problems with their kidneys. To become a certified dialysis nurse, you will need 2000 hours of experience in caring for nephrology and dialysis patients over a period of two years. Fifteen hours of continuing education in nephrology, an RN license, and the capability to pass a certification test. A certified legal nurse consultant uses their expertise to consult on medical lawsuits, offering information about the healthcare system. To become a legal nurse consultant, you will need a registered nurse license, but a BSN is not always required. A nurse midwife delivers babies, as well as providing healthcare before, during and after the birth for both the mother and the child. They can conduct gynecological exams, prenatal and postnatal care, as well as family-planning information. To become a nurse midwife, you will need a Master of Science in nursing, and a midwife-specialty program could help. A nurse anesthetist helps to provide patients with anesthesia when they are being prepared for surgery, and can assist in caring for individuals during their time in the operating room. A nurse anesthetist needs to gain two years of experience as a nurse with their BSN before enrolling in a MSN in nurse anesthesia program. A doctoral degree may also be required. A nurse care manager monitors the progress of patients, s Continue reading >>

Master Of Science In Nursing Salary

Master Of Science In Nursing Salary

The typical Master of Science in Nursing salary ranges from $60,000 to $120,000 depending on the field and location. When a registered nurse decides to earn his or her Master of Science in Nursing degree, considering the field of specialization is critical to determining the future Master of Science in Nursing Salary and demand of his or her job. With a Master’s degree in nursing, the RN is ready to fulfill a role as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in adult, med surge, community, public health, psychiatric, or mental health fields. The MSN also prepares an RN for work as a Nurse Practitioner, a Nursing Service Administrator, or a Nursing Instructor. Two of the top Master of Science in Nursing programs in the nation, Regis University in Denver, and the University of Pennsylvania, provide unique benefits to students specializing in a Master’s programs for nursing. Regis is well-known for helping its students enter the most competitive hospitals, and their job placement is the best in the nation. The University of Pennsylvania boasts the most specialized training in the country, preparing its students to work in more obscure and in-demand fields. Details About the Master of Science in Nursing Salary Specializing in a field of nursing is key to job demand, advancement, and a lucrative Master of Science in Nursing Salary. While most BSNs had to begin their career as float-nurses, by the time a career nurse has earned his or her MSN, the field is open for high-salary opportunities and great mobility. A nurse practitioner may work in a private office and earn $95,000 a year, or as the head of a unit in a hospital making over $100,000. In all cases, nursing is highly in demand, and the MSN gives a person an almost impenetrable fortress against unemployment since the degree is n Continue reading >>

The Best Nursing Careers And Specialties

The Best Nursing Careers And Specialties

The nursing shortage continues, and demand for nurses is expected to increase as the baby boomer generation ages and the nurses that are part of that generation retire. Nurses who specialize in various areas are often in even higher demand. The 20 specialties listed here were chosen based upon a combination of demand, salary, and settings. Over 100 different nursing specialties exist, each of them with different demands, settings, and schedules. Nevertheless, the specialties listed in this article were chosen to cover a wide range of nursing interests. If you’re into nursing, there’s something here for you! A Word About Salaries The salaries listed here come as much as possible from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, though some are also drawn from other sources. No matter what the median salary for a specialty, nursing salaries vary widely based on where the jobs are located. If you live in one of the less-populated states, your salary may be about half of the median. If you live in a very populous state, it may be higher. When making any employment decision, take the time to find out what the salary ranges in your particular geographical area are. All of our financial and other statistical information is taken from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, unless otherwise indicated. So, without further ado, in alphabetical order, here are the 20 best nursing specialties: The 20 Best Nursing Specialties Certified Nurse Midwife Certified nurse midwife is one of the “advanced practice” specialties which require extra schooling and/or experience and formal certification. What they do: As a certified nurse midwife, you will work alongside obstetricians seeing patients. When low-risk pregnancies are involved, you will follow your patient throughout her pregnancy, provide r Continue reading >>

Best Endocrinology Nursing Careers + Salary Outlook | Healthgrad 2017

Best Endocrinology Nursing Careers + Salary Outlook | Healthgrad 2017

Home Nursing Endocrinology Nursing Careers + Salary Basics Endocrinology Nursing Careers + Salary Basics The following page shows the career & education requirements, salary and job outlook for a Endocrinology Nursing around the country. Endocrinology nurses are usually pediatric nurses who deal with the endocrine glands of children. As a result, the majority of their patients are those with diabetes. Their patients usually have some form of developmental or growth delay, which can be caused by diabetes but also by hypoglycemia, thyroid problems, and pituitary problems. The nurse works hand in hand with the pediatrician or physician in order to develop a care and treatment plan for the patients. Because diabetes is the most common condition that these nurses work with, they are often experts on managing this condition, and on educating patients and their families on healthy lifestyle choices. Endocrinology nurses usually work in specialized diabetes clinics. In addition, they can also be found in pediatricians offices, hospitals, and more. To become an endocrinology nurse, you must first be a registered nurse (RN). This means completing at least a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN). In the past, those with associates degrees would also be considered, but this now being phased out. Those who have an interest in endocrinology should ensure their curriculum includes endocrinology, pediatrics, diabetes, and other such courses. Most endocrinology nurses, however, are advanced practice nurses, or nurse practitioners, which means they have also completed a master in science of nursing (MSN) with a specialization in endocrinology. To become a registered nurse, all nurses must take and pass the NCLEX-RN examination, which is a national examination. Every state also has other Continue reading >>

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