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Diabetes Nurse Specialist Training

Postgraduate Diploma In Diabetes (online Delivery)

Postgraduate Diploma In Diabetes (online Delivery)

Postgraduate Diploma in Diabetes (Online Delivery) Postgraduate Diploma in Diabetes (Online Delivery) This clinically-focussed course in diabetes is run with the collaborative partner Diploma MSc and provides post-qualification preparation for roles in diabetes specialist teams, diabetes specialist nursing, practice nursing and allied health professionals aiming to provide diabetes services in primary care. It is designed to equip professionals with the knowledge and skills to deliver a first rate diabetes service, and independently access information to critically assess, evaluate and disseminate the evidence base for diabetes care. Delivered entirely online, the Postgraduate Diploma in Diabetes focuses on the person with diabetes and supports the improvement of care. It recognises the contribution of the whole diabetes team and prepares professionals for specialist practice. The curriculum is based on the International Curriculum for Diabetes Health Professional Education produced by the International Diabetes Federation and meets the highest international standards for diabetes education. On successful completion of this course you could go on to study the MSc Diabetes . The postgraduate diploma in diabetes starts with a one day residential induction of clinically focussed teaching at the Universitys Glyntaff campus, followed by these modules: Each easy to use online module will last six weeks, using real life case problems linked to forum based discussions, a reflective portfolio, group activities and a case-based examination. The postgraduate diploma in diabetes course is delivered by an innovative and experienced team who have an established international reputation in diabetes and medical education. You will develop problem-solving skills in preparation for lead Continue reading >>

The Patient With Diabetes- Archived [?]

The Patient With Diabetes- Archived [?]

Get weekly personalised updates on modules relevant to you. Sign up for email alerts from BMJ Learning Tell us what you think. We are working hard to improve BMJ Learning and want to know if you like our changes and what we should do next. Get weekly personalised updates on modules relevant to you. Sign up for email alerts from BMJ Learning Tell us what you think. We are working hard to improve BMJ Learning and want to know if you like our changes and what we should do next. 10046986en_GBThis course has been archived. Individual modules within this course may still be valid, but you if you complete this course now, you will not receive any extra CPD points or be able to claim a certificate for the course. If you have previously completed this course, you can claim your certificate using the button on this page. Click OK to start the first module in this course. Click Cancel to stay on this page.PLEASE NOTELoading.... Continue reading >>

Becoming A Diabetes Nurse Consultant

Becoming A Diabetes Nurse Consultant

Deciding how and when to specialise in your nursing career can take considerable thought and planning. If you’re attracted to the idea of specialising in diabetes care, here are the steps you might want to take, the roles available, and the opportunities on offer. What the role involves Diabetes is becoming increasingly prevalent – due to an ageing population, obesity and sedentary lifestyles – and is predicted to affect some five million people in the UK by 2025. Diabetes Specialist Nurses (DSNs) and Diabetes Nurse Consultants (DNCs) work wholly in diabetes care. They may work in primary care; secondary care providing inpatient care; intermediate care working in the community; or in a mixture of these settings. The DSN is often the first point of contact for patients, referring them to other specialist services that are appropriate to their needs. DSN’s spend at least half of their time in clinical care, with the rest taken up by patient and staff education. More senior and experienced DSNs and DNCs are expected to take on other elements such as audit and research and guideline development. Generally, most nurse consultant roles are split equally between service development; clinical practice; teaching and educating others; research, (including quality and audit). How to specialise Most nurses will come across patients with diabetes. If you work in an acute setting, acting as a link nurse – linking in with the specialist diabetes nurse in your area to ensure excellent care of patients with diabetes – can be a good place to start. Work shadowing diabetes specialists is also a good way to build networks. Experience of teaching and making autonomous decisions is also helpful. Cathy Taylor, careers advisor at the Royal College of Nursing, explains: ‘Some nurs Continue reading >>

Online Education | Diabetes Update 2017

Online Education | Diabetes Update 2017

Course Description Regardless of the practice setting, most clinicians are involved in managing care for patients with diabetes. Staying abreast of the latest research and treatment strategies for glycemic control is essential for helping patients achieve maximum health and manage complications. This online course focuses on current approaches to recognizing and managing diabetes across clinical settings. Lectures were recorded in February 2016 at the Diabetes Update conference provided by Continuing Nursing Education at the University of Washington School of Nursing. Teaching methods include video, audio and downloadable handouts. "A ton of information packed into one day! Speakers are state-of-the-art and include useful, important research data." "Even though I am not a diabetes educator, I encounter many diabetic patients in my practice. I learned so much about their medications and the issues they face." "Excellent speakers overall, and I learned a lot. This was the best diabetes update I have been to." Watch Lecture Previews Target Audience Nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse educators, certified diabetes educators, dietitians, nutritionists, pharmacists, social workers, health educators, physical therapists and other healthcare professionals across all settings. Learning objectives After taking this course, you should be better able to: Distinguish evidence-based nutrition recommendations from fad diet ideas. List the risk factors for developing gestational diabetes (GDM). Identify key feature of Type 1 diabetes. Recognize the role in therapy of new formulations of insulin. Compare and contrast the mechanism of action of different classes of anti-diabetic agents. Topics Food Facts, Fads and the Future Sweet Baby! Implications of Diabetes in Pregnancy EDIC - 30 Year Continue reading >>

Evolving Roles: From Diabetes Educators To Advanced Diabetes Managers

Evolving Roles: From Diabetes Educators To Advanced Diabetes Managers

In Brief The evolution of advanced practice in diabetes management has emulated the advanced practice efforts of nursing groups. However, many disciplines are involved in the care and education of people with diabetes. This article reviews the expanded role of health professionals in diabetes and describes the development of a new clinical management credential for nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists with advanced degrees and advanced practice experience in diabetes. In the mid-1970s, the first health care professionals known as “diabetes educators” provided basic patient education to complement the medical care provided by diabetes specialists. They taught patients the skills of self-monitoring, meal planning, and medication administration. In the 1970s and early 1980s, people with diabetes were frequently hospitalized for hyperglycemia to “get their blood glucose under control.” Diabetes educators provided education for such hospitalized patients and for people newly diagnosed with diabetes. Often, this was the only diabetes education patients ever received. Changes in insurance reimbursement policies during the 1980s led to a decrease in hospitalizations for hyperglycemia, and outpatient diabetes education programs were developed to meet the continuing need for education among people with diabetes. Still, despite the growing numbers of diabetes educators and diabetes outpatient education programs throughout the 1980s, only about 35% of patients with diabetes attended a class or program about diabetes at some time during the course of their disease.1 Patients and health care professionals often cited the lack of insurance reimbursement for diabetes education services as the reason for this inadequate level of diabetes education. The National Institutes of Heal Continue reading >>

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Recent research commissioned by the U.S. Department of Education has shown that students benefit tremendously from being able to complete their coursework online. Indeed, their academic outcomes are often better than those of students who have completed their work in classroom settings. The nursing profession, which is keen to ensure their entire workforce is as highly educated as possible, has taken this to heart. As a result, various MSN nursing programs are now offered partially or fully online. Diabetes nurses are those who help people with a disease that stops the body from absorbing or producing enough insulin. The largest proportion of the working day of a diabetes nurse is spent on liaising between patients, their family members and their doctors. As such, communication skills are absolutely vital in this field. Indeed, as a diabetes nurse, you will become an advocate for people who suffer from this disease, or for those who are likely to develop it. Prevention is very important, and educating people about healthy lifestyle choices is a hugely important part of your job. At present, only two online MSN degrees in diabetes nursing exist in the country. One of these is accredited through CCNE, which is the Capella University program. The other one, which is offered by Columbia University, is not accredited. The college itself is accredited through the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The program is also known by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. However, this association does not currently offer accreditation at all. Hence, although this program is not CCNE accredited, we have still decided to add it in this information, as it is still a high quality program that you may want to enroll in. 1. Capella University At Capella University, stu Continue reading >>

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

How do I become a diabetes educator? One must be a healthcare professional who has a defined role as a diabetes educator, not for those who may perform some diabetes related functions as part of or in the course of other usual and customary duties. Practice as a diabetes educator means actively employed for compensation, providing a direct or indirect professional contribution to the care and self-management education of people with diabetes. Diabetes education, also referred to as diabetes self-management education or diabetes self-management training, is performed by health care professionals who have appropriate credentials and experience consistent with the particular profession's scope of practice. Diabetes self-management education is defined as the interactive, collaborative, ongoing process involving the person with diabetes or pre-diabetes and/or the caregivers and the educator(s). The process includes: Assessment of the individual's specific education needs Identification of the individual's specific diabetes self-management goals Education and behavioral intervention directed toward helping the individual achieve identified self-management goals Evaluation(s) of the individual's attainment of identified self-management goals Proper documentation of all education encounters Diabetes educators can be found in a variety of settings: hospitals, physician offices, clinics, home health, wellness programs, to name a few. They most often work within accredited or recognized diabetes education programs. This means that the diabetes education program has met requirements set forth by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and can bill for diabetes self-management training through two different codes: G0108 and G0109, which are for individual and group diabetes ed Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Nurse Practitioner: Promoting Partnerships In Care

The Diabetes Nurse Practitioner: Promoting Partnerships In Care

Diabetes Spectrum Volume 12 Number 2, 1999, Pages 113—117 These pages are best viewed with Netscape version 3.0 or higher or Internet Explorer version 3.0 or higher. When viewed with other browsers, some characters or attributes may not be rendered correctly. Clinical Decision Making The Diabetes Nurse Practitioner: Promoting Partnerships in Care Jane Jeffrie Seley, RN, BSN, MPH, MSN, GNP, CDE, CHES, Phyllis Furst, RN, MA, ANP-C, CDE, Terry Gray, RN, PhD, ANP-C, CDE, Donna Jornsay, RN, BSN, CPNP, CDE, and Nancy Reilly Wohl, RN, MSN, ANP-C, CDE The treatment of diabetes is complex, involving numerous lifestyle adaptations and requiring a great deal of teaching and support. Advances in technology have contributed to the need for education and patient participation in care. Many procedures formerly performed by health care professionals, such as blood glucose monitoring, are now routinely done at home by patients. In the past 20 years, nursing has been a major contributor to the improvement in the quality of care provided to people with diabetes, as shown in the findings of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.1 Working with professionals from other disciplines, nurses have helped develop and test National Standards for Diabetes Patient Education. These standards still serve as a guide to the planning, implementation, and evaluation of comprehensive, quality programs. The recognition process for meeting the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education currently offered by the American Diabetes Association2 came from this initiative. In 1986, an examination was developed through the National Certification Board for Diabetes Education (NCBDE) to certify diabetes educators.3 According to the NCBDE national office staff, there are currently 10,000 certif Continue reading >>

Improvement Of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care By The Development Of Educational Programs

Improvement Of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care By The Development Of Educational Programs

Improvement of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care by the Development of Educational Programs We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Improvement of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care by the Development of Educational Programs Bakalis Vissarion, Maria Malliarou, [...], and Sofia Zyga Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion educational programs help patients with diabetes to obtain information about their condition and improve their self-care skills. Key words: diabetes, diabetes clinical nurse specialist, training Diabetes is among the chronic diseases that feature significantly in public health and are the greatest cause of disability and premature death in Europe. Diabetes is a chronic, and largely preventable, disease that can lead to cardiovascular disease, blindness, kidney failure, loss of limbs and loss of life. It causes suffering and hardship for the approximately 60 million people in the European Region currently living with the disease, while also straining its health syste Continue reading >>

How Do I Become ... A Diabetes Nurse Consultant?

How Do I Become ... A Diabetes Nurse Consultant?

Student Nursing Times talk to Diabetes Nurse Consultant Jill Hill about what makes her job so worthwhile Full, instant access to all stories Customised email alerts straight to your inbox 5,000+ practice articles in our clinical archive Online learning units on fundamental aspects of nursing care Speak with a member of the team about providing Nursing Times for your whole team Already have an account? Sign in Continue reading >>

Cookie Policy

Cookie Policy

Diabetes The Diabetes Specialist Nursing Team provides a service for people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes living in North Derbyshire. Our specialist nurses support patients to improve their overall diabetes management and to reduce the short and long term complications. The team will alter treatment programmes, initiate new treatments and advise and counsel patients on how to manage and live with their diabetes more effectively. The Specialist Diabetes Service is a small service covering North Derbyshire offering specialist advice in the management of patients with diabetes. This includes specialist advice to children with diabetes. Support is also given in education and training to clinical staff and health care professionals working in the community. Educational programmes The team is also available as a resource to other practitioners, for advice, support and teaching either via the telephone or face to face. We provide and support a number of educational programmes on diabetes management for people living with diabetes. Programmes include; A range of courses and training are provided for practitioners and staff caring for people with diabetes, including; Understanding diabetes - Day course for unqualified staff Foundation diabetes - 2 day course for qualified staff Diabetes and learning disability - Day course for professionals and carers How To Access The Service Referrals can be for a variety of reasons, usually to improve the control of an individual's diabetes and can be made by any health professional; GP, professions allied to health or by individuals living with diabetes. Patients will be seen either in a clinic setting local to them, or via a home visit (Home visits are for individuals who are unable to access clinics). Service Locations Clinics are held i Continue reading >>

The Role Of A Diabetes Specialist Nurse

The Role Of A Diabetes Specialist Nurse

For the nearly 12 million women in America with diabetes, getting proper care for their condition can improve their quality of life and can even mean the difference between life and death. Women make up half of all diabetes sufferers in the United States and nearly one-quarter of diabetes patients do not even know they have the disease. Providing a key service to diabetes patients, diabetes specialist nurses undergo special training that educates and prepares them for a role as a diabetes specialist. Specialized Training Before working as a diabetes specialist, a nurse must complete certain training and educational requirements. The educational path starts with a bachelor's degree in nursing, followed by taking and passing the National Council Licensure Examination. A nurse may practice as a diabetes nurse, but to advance in her career she must earn an advanced degree and certification. Once a diabetes nurse has earned a master's in nursing and completed 500 professional hours in diabetes nursing, she may apply for certification through the American Association of Diabetes Educators and obtain the Advanced Diabetes Management Certification. Patient Care Like other nursing disciplines, the main role of a diabetes specialist nurse is to provide specialized care to diabetes patients. Duties include monitoring a patient's blood sugar, minimizing diabetic nerve damage, providing pre-operative care and performing physical examinations. The diabetes specialist nurse relays information between the patient and his endocrinologist, family and other healthcare providers. Along with diabetic care, the nurse provides general care, such as taking vital signs, answering common medical questions and coordinating patient care with other providers. Other patient care duties include inter Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Nurse Specialist

The Diabetes Nurse Specialist

After many years of controlling her type 2 diabetes with oral medication, 92-year-old VNSNY CHOICE MLTC member Manuela* was recently started on daily insulin injections. But with her advanced dementia, she couldnt administer the shots herself. So Christina F., her CHOICE Care Coordinator, reached out to Yael R., a VNSNY Clinical Support Manager, certified diabetes educator, and diabetes nurse specialist. Yael is invaluable because of her vast range of diabetes expertise, explains Christina. No one is better at assessing patients and coming up with a diabetes regimen suitable for their needs. Manuelas switch from oral medication to injectable insulin is a common occurrence, says Yael, whos worked with VNSNY for 22 years and has been a diabetes specialist and educator since 2004. Most people can manage their type 2 diabetes with oral medications for the first eight to ten years after theyve been diagnosed. After a decade, though, most will have to start using insulin because of the diseases progressive nature. Insulin therapy comes with a unique set of challenges, however. Many patients, as well as their family and caregivers, have an aversion to needles. Some patients also suffer from impaired dexterity due to conditions like Parkinsons, MS, or ALS, making self-injection impossible. Plus, insulin needs to be administered at the same time every day, which can be a challenge for people with irregular caregiver schedules. Whatever the obstacles, we work around them, says Yael. Ill review the clinical notes and come up with a recommendation that the nurse then presents to the doctor. If theres still no improvement after a few visits, she will accompany the nurse on a patient call to identify the issues that are impeding treatment. One patient wasnt taking his insulin becaus Continue reading >>

Nu5077 Diabetes Management | University College Cork

Nu5077 Diabetes Management | University College Cork

Part-Time. See Additional Teaching Mode Information for more info. 400 See Fees and Costs for full details. Now closed for applications. 2018-19 dates will be confirmed early 2018. Centre of Nurse Education, Mercy University Hospital, Cork. Exact rooms to be confirmed. This module is designed for registered nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals who wish to develop and extend their knowledge of the management of individuals with diabetes. Clinical issues surrounding diabetes management are discussed from an evidenced based perspective for example: disease management, diagnostic procedures and progress of condition, therapeutic options, management of complications, and lifestyle and cultural aspects of diabetes management. On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Apply knowledge of diabetes to the management of individuals with diabetes Recognise the diagnostic procedures and progress of the condition Examine the therapeutic options and be able to identify and treat complications Discuss the lifestyle and cultural aspects of diabetes care. Main aspects of the content include: Classification and Diagnosis, Diabetes Management, Lifestyle and Culture, Therapeutic Options, Complications and Team management. Teaching Method(s):25 x 1hr(s) Other (Lectures and will also include group work, video/practical workshops); 75 x 1hr(s) Directed Study (Self-directed learning). The Diabetes Management Module is delivered over one college term and consists of 24 theory/practical hours. Students will also engage in online learning. Assessment:Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 1,500 words written project). Open to Registered Health Care Professionals in Nursing, Midwifery, Medicine, and Clinical Therapies or other allied disci Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (degree Level)

Diabetes Mellitus (degree Level)

A module for the practitioner, carer, or person with diabetes or related syndromes, which explores care issues and complication prevention Visit: Professional Development Unit, Level 4 Rolle Building, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA United Kingdom Whether its study days, modules, short courses, degrees or masters programmes that you are looking for, we're sure to have something to suit your needs and circumstances, so why not join our mailing list . This 20 credit degree-level module is aimed atpractitioners, carers and/or people with diabetes or related syndromes. You will explore care issues and complication prevention as well as increasing your capacity for evidence based enquiryin disease pathwaysrelating to diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. This module is basedupon the new competencies and explorescore knowledge and care issues relating to diabetes mellitus, pre-diabetes,management issues and complication prevention. Complete our survey for the chance to win a 20 Amazon voucher Blended learning approach with face to face delivery in Plymouth *This module was previously known as HEAB396 At the end of the module you will be able to: demonstratedevelopment of knowledge and practice in diabetes care exploretheories relating to insulin resistance and the development of diabetes, criticallyreflect upon the screening for and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and itscomplications. criticallyappraise epidemiological data relating to diabetes and pre-diabetes syndromes. explainthe pathophysiology of insulin resistance, Type 1 diabetes, and other rarerforms of the disease process. discusslifestyle changes individuals may need to make to improve health outcomes. The assessment for this module is a written piece of coursework. (Please note that these Continue reading >>

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