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Diabetes Numbness In Legs

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy, a nerve disorder, is a complication of diabetes that can lead to problems throughout the body. Persons with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but significant clinical neuropathy can develop within the first 10 years after receiving a diabetes diagnosis. The risk of developing neuropathy increases the longer a person has diabetes. About half of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. What causes diabetic neuropathy? Although the exact causes of diabetic neuropathy are unknown, several factors may contribute to the disorder, including the following: high blood glucose High blood glucose causes chemical changes in nerves and impairs the nerves' ability to transmit signals. It also has the potential to damage blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to the nerves. inherited factors There are some genetic traits that may make some people more susceptible to nerve disease than others. What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy? The following are the most common symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms include: numbness in the hands or feet pain in the hands, feet, or legs problems with internal organs such as the digestive tract, heart, or sexual organs causing the following: indigestion diarrhea or constipation dizziness bladder infections impotence weakness weight loss depression The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis. What are the different types of diabetic neuropathy? Diffuse neuropathy is neuropathy that affects many parts of the body, and includes the following: diffuse peripheral neuropathy - neuropathy affecting nerves in the extre Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Management

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Management

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Symptoms: Patients can experience diabetic neuropathic pain from damaged nerves that can feel like sharp pain, burning, tingling or numbness in the arms/hands and legs/feet. Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Causes: Diabetic neuropathic pain is caused when there is a prolonged exposure to high blood sugar/glucose levels, causing nerve damage in the body. Other factors that may contribute to diabetic neuropathic pain include inflammation, genetic factors, smoking and alcohol abuse. There are different types of diabetic neuropathy causing different types of pain symptoms. You may have more than one type causing more than one type of diabetic neuropathic pain symptom as well. Most of the diabetic neuropathic pain symptoms do develop gradually and may not be noticeable until significant nerve injury is present. The different types of diabetic neuropathy are listed below. Numbness. Tingling and burning sensations that may be worse at night. Decreased ability to feel pain in the feet causing unnoticed injury that can progress to infections. Commonly, patient can develop ulcers and infection causing deformity and bone and joint pain. Pain with movement. Allodynia or pain to light touch. Weakness. Mononeuropathy also called Focal Neuropathy: This is typically seen more commonly in older adults. The pain symptoms from this condition can occur suddenly but tends to improve and resolve over a period of weeks to months. A specific nerve gets injured, often in the head, torso or leg, but there usually is no associated long-term injury. The pain symptoms of mononeuropathy include: Double vision, difficulty focusing, pain in one eye. Paralysis on one side of the face (Bell’s palsy). Pain in specific area of the leg, thigh or foot. Chest or abdominal pain that can s Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

DEAR DOCTOR K: I have peripheral neuropathy. I know that people with diabetes often get neuropathy, but I'm not diabetic. What else can cause this condition? And what can I do about it? DEAR READER: Neuropathy is a medical term that means nerve damage. The type of nerve damage that people with diabetes get involves specific nerve fibers in all nerves, particularly the nerves that travel to the legs and feet. (There are other conditions in which a single nerve leading to the legs and feet is pinched, causing pain. An example is what is often called a "slipped disk" or "herniated disk" in the lower part of the spine). The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include numbness and tingling. Some cases cause burning, shooting or stabbing pain. When the doctor does a physical examination and touches your feet and lower legs with something as light as a feather (like some cotton), you may not feel it. However, you will feel it if the cotton touches your skin in the thigh or elsewhere in the body. You may also lose sensation to a pinprick in the lower legs and feet, but not the rest of you. Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy. But neuropathy can result from other causes as well. These include: -- Excessive alcohol intake. -- Hypothyroidism. In this condition, the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. -- Amyloidosis, a disease in which an abnormal protein accumulates in the body. -- Vitamin deficiencies, particularly vitamin B1, B12 and folate deficiency. -- Critical illness, particularly if you develop a severe inflammatory response to infection. -- Guillain-Barre syndrome. This uncommon autoimmune disorder damages the peripheral nerves. Diagnosing peripheral neuropathy is best done by electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS Continue reading >>

Painful Peripheral Neuropathy:

Painful Peripheral Neuropathy:

Neuropathy, Neuropathic Pain, and Reviewed by Nick Christelis, MBBCH, FRCA, FFPMRCA, FANZCA, FFPMANZCA Co-chair, International Neuromodulation Society Public Education, Outreach, and Website Committee, 2016 - Director and Co-Founder Victoria Pain Specialists, Richmond, Australia Introduction This article is intended for patients, caregivers, and the general public, as well as doctors and medical specialists. It has three sections. The first defines neuropathy. The second gives a broad overview of neuropathic pain. The final section concerns painful peripheral neuropathy, a common neurological complaint, its causes, diagnosis and treatment. I. What Is Neuropathy? Neuropathy is a condition that results from damage to, or dysfunction of, the nervous system. Most often, the damage exists in the peripheral nervous system, which lies beyond the spine and brain, although brain injury, such as stroke, can also result in neuropathic symptoms. The symptoms of neuropathy depend on the underlying nerves whose function has been affected. Neuropathy that damages sensory nerves can cause numbness, weakness and stabbing or burning pain – symptoms that may worsen if not treated early. If there has also been damage to the type of nerves that convey the sense of touch, vibration, and temperature, patients may experience tingling, numbness, or the sense of wearing an invisible glove or sock over their hands or feet. If there is damage to motor nerves that control stability and movement, patients may have a lack or coordination, weakness, or cramping. Finally, if the autonomic nerves that regulate internal organ function have also been damaged, patients may experience a reduction in saliva, tears, perspiration, or other organ or gland dysfunction. The Impact of Neuropathy Neuropathy is a Continue reading >>

American Association Of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

American Association Of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

Patients Donate to Advance Research and Education With your help, the AANEM Foundation can fund research that will improve the lives of patients with neuromuscular diseases. What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Patients with diabetes often develop abnormalities of the peripheral nerves in the extremities after a period of many years. Symptoms usually develop 10-20 years after the initial diabetes diagnosis. Patients can experience numbness or abnormal tingling sensations and pain in the hands and especially in the feet. Other symptoms are lightheadedness, heartburn, swallowing problems, diarrhea or constipation, bladder problems and failure to achieve sexual arousal. This type of neuropathy (nerve injury) usually develops in stages. First one may experience intermittent pain and tingling in extremities, particularly in the feet. In later stages, the pain is more intense and constant. In the last stage, all pain sensation is lost to an area. This greatly increases the risk of severe tissue injury because the patient can no longer detect pain to let them know they are injured. Who gets Diabetic Neuropathy? Decreased blood flow and increased blood sugar level are the causes of diabetic neuropathy. When the blood sugar level is higher than normal for an extended period of time, the blood vessels and nerves start to degenerate. This degeneration is what causes the nerves to be less effective. Electrodiagnostic testing in the form of nerve conduction studies (NCS) are a sensitive way of detecting the development of diabetic neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic testing can also exclude other abnormalities that can be confused with diabetic neuropathy. How is Diabetic Neuropathy treated? Treatment is aimed at slowing down or stopping the blood vessels and nerves from degenerating. Treatment i Continue reading >>

Healing Numb Feet

Healing Numb Feet

Overview of treatment approaches: • Nondrug therapies • Relaxation and biofeedback • Anodyne therapy • Exercise • Massage • Daily foot care Diabetes is hard on feet. Because the feet are farthest from the heart, any problems with blood flow can leave feet without enough circulation. Results can include numbness, loss of foot strength, and worse. Fortunately, there are some good ways to heal and protect your feet. As Birgitta I. Rice, MS, RPh, CHES, wrote here, much of the pain and numbness people with diabetes experience comes from nerve damage. The nerves are injured both by poor circulation and by high glucose levels. We really need healthy nerves. (As a person with a nerve disease, I know about this.) According to Rice, “Loss of nerve fibers can result in muscle weakness, numbness, loss of reflexes, foot deformities, change in gait, and impaired balance and coordination. Loss of sensitivity to pain or temperature can also occur, leading in turn to blisters and sores from foot injuries that go unfelt.” Numbness is dangerous. Sometimes, people can have a pebble in their shoe and not notice it. Others may get in a hot bath and not realize their feet are being scalded. These kinds of seemingly minor things can lead to infections, which don’t heal because of having poor circulation. This is the major pathway to losing a leg to amputation. People with diabetes are eight times more likely than other people to have a lower leg amputated. If you just woke up one day with numb feet, you would notice a big difference and ask about ways to treat it. It doesn’t work that way, though. Numbness comes on slowly over years, so you don’t notice day-to-day changes. Also, severe pain often comes before numbness, so that the numbness is perceived as a relief rather Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Definition Diabetic neuropathy is a nerve disorder and its many complications that are caused by diabetes. Description Diabetic neuropathy refers to several types of nerve damage associated with diabetes. The most common form is a slowly progressive degeneration of nerves in the arms and legs, in which the longest nerves (e.g., in the toes and feet) tend to be affected first and most severely. As nerve damage worsens, symptoms spread up the legs and begin in the hands. Neuropathy from diabetes can occur at any point, although typically it occurs in patients who have had diabetes for a longer period of time or in those who have had poorly controlled diabetes. This type of neuropathy from diabetes causes numbness, pain, weakness, and in severe circumstances can affect nerves that control basic bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, sweating, blood pressure and others. Other types of diabetic neuropathy include isolated injury to one of the cranial nerves. Also, isolated nerves in the legs and arms may become acutely injured as a result of diabetes. Causes Scientists do not know how diabetic neuropathy occurs, although several factors interact together. High blood glucose causes chemical changes in nerves, impairing their ability to transmit nerve signals. High blood glucose also damages blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to the nerves. Also, inherited factors probably unrelated to diabetes may make some people more susceptible to nerve disease than others. Diabetic neuropathy appears to be more common in smokers, people over 40 years of age, and those who have had problems controlling the levels of glucose in their blood. Symptoms Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy Doctors divide diabetic neuropathy into three main types: Peripheral Neuropathy. The most comm Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic neuropathy definition and facts Diabetes is thought to damage nerves as a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly causes: Autonomic neuropathy causes symptoms related to dysfunction of an organ system, such as: Diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy is usually done by a clinical exam. There is no cure for diabetic neuropathy, but treatments are available to manage the symptoms. Diabetic nerve pain may be controlled by medications such as tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine (Cymbalta), or certain antiseizure medications. Keeping tight control of blood sugar levels is the best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy and other complications of diabetes. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy? The symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy depend upon the type of neuropathy that is present. Signs and symptoms can also vary in severity among affected people. Signs and symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include: Numbness or tingling of the feet and lower legs Pain or burning sensations Loss of sensation in the feet or lower legs Sometimes, but less commonly, these symptoms can occur in the hands or arms Signs and symptoms of diabetic proximal neuropathy include: Pain, usually on one side, in the hips, buttocks, or thighs Signs and symptoms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy depend upon the organ system that is involved and can include: Feeling full after eating a small amount Inability to empty the bladder completely Decrease in vaginal lubrication in women Rapid resting heartbeat Signs and symptoms of diabetic focal neuropathy also depend upon the location of the affected nerve. The symptoms can appear suddenly. It usually does not cause a long t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

Diabetes And Leg Swelling: The Terrible Twosome

If you are diabetic, you need to worry about a lot more things like heart diseases and leg swelling. This causes peripheral edema in some cases and can be painful. If you see symptoms of swelling in your ankles, lower legs or feet, it is time to pay your physician an emergency visit. Diabetes expand blood circulation in an inappropriate way, which can cause swelling in the lower leg region. However, there could be other reasons as well that would cause the swelling. So a visit to the doctor is a must. Diabetes is a serious disease which gives rise to many further complications; swelling in the legs is one of them. Let’s discuss a few reasons that could be contributing to the swelling and its cure. What can lead to leg swelling? For any diabetic patient, it is a must to consult a doctor in case you notice any changes in the body. A patient who’s been living with diabetes for several years needs to be extra careful because this disease comes with so many attached risks. If you are diabetic and have noticed some leg swelling recently, the following could be a few reasons for it. The main reason for leg swelling in diabetes is peripheral edema. Fluids collect in the feet, ankles and leg and this condition can become quite severe if left untreated. A consultation with a doctor is a must. Sometimes, a diabetic may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This is a condition that leads to numbness in legs and feet. As a result, the diabetic may not be able to feel an injury, maybe something even as severe as a sprain or a fracture and continue to use the limb. But the swelling caused by the injury is what will raise concern, which is why a consultation with the doctor becomes very important. Diabetics have low immunity towards infections and your swelling could very well be a sign Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy | Western Washington Medical Group

Diabetic Neuropathy | Western Washington Medical Group

If youre one of 29 million people living with diabetes, youre at risk of diabetic neuropathy, a condition caused by diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy occurs for several reasons that are all related to the long-term damage caused by extended periods of high blood sugar. Before going into the specific causes and implications of diabetic neuropathy, its important to first have a top-level understanding of diabetes and its effects on the body. Diabetes, in short, is the inability to manage changing levels of blood glucose, or blood sugar levels in the body. Problems arise when the body has trouble maintaining the balance of blood glucose levels, and must be treated. Type 1 Diabetes: The pancreas, the organ responsible for producing insulin, has difficulty producing enough insulin for the body due to damaged cells in the pancreas. Insulin is necessary for blood sugar regulation, and without it, blood sugar spikes occur causing unstable and damaging conditions in the body. Type 2 Diabetes: The pancreas produces enough insulin, but the cells reject the insulin. When this happens, the body creates an overproduction of insulin, and eventually, the pancreas ends up overworked and damaged. For more on Diabetes and blood sugar monitoring, read our previous blog, Blood Glucose Monitoring: Why and How? With diabetes, the body has difficulty recovering from high blood sugar spikes (after a meal, drink, or sugary snack), leading to extended periods of high blood sugar in the bloodstream. Over time, these high levels of blood sugar can damage nerves in the body. This nerve damage caused by diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy, and the signs and symptoms vary for each one. Many people experience anywhere from one to many symptoms, and some Continue reading >>

Tingling In Hands And Feet

Tingling In Hands And Feet

Tingling in the hands or feet is common and can be a long-term or temporary symptom. In many cases, the pins and needles feeling can be caused by a sitting or sleeping position and is nothing to worry about. However, if the tingling hands or feet come with other symptoms, like numbness, itching, pain or muscle wasting it can be a sign of nerve damage. This can be the result of diseases such as diabetes, a bacterial or viral infection, toxic exposure or an injury. The medical term for this nerve damage is peripheral neuropathy and it’s estimated almost 1 in 10 people in the UK aged 55 or over is affected to some degree. There are more than 100 different types of peripheral neuropathy and over time it can result in decreased mobility and even disability. That’s why it's important to seek medical advice promptly. Causes of tingling in the hands and feet In the UK, diabetes is the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy. Between 10% and 20% of people recently diagnosed with diabetes will have a peripheral neuropathy, called peripheral polyneuropathy. In diabetic polyneuropathy, tingling often first develops in both feet and then goes up the legs, followed by tingling that affects both hands and goes up the arms. These are often the first signs of diabetes. In a number of peripheral neuropathy cases, the cause is 'idiopathic' which means what the cause is isn’t known. However, there are a variety of conditions that can cause the condition such as: Vitamin deficiencies. Vitamins E, B1, B6, B12 and niacin are essential for healthy nerve function. A lack of B12 can lead to pernicious anaemia, an important cause of peripheral neuropathy. However, too much B6 can also cause tingling in the hands and feet. Alcoholism. Alcoholics are more likely to have vitamin deficienci Continue reading >>

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Cause Your Feet To Go Numb?

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Cause Your Feet To Go Numb?

Numbness in the feet is a symptom of neuropathy or nerve damage, one of the most common long-term complications of type 2 diabetes. Neuropathy is caused by poor blood sugar control that persists over a long period of time. “The higher the blood sugars and the longer they stay high, the greater the chance of the person developing neuropathy,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at the University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “The nerves that get affected by high sugars tend to be the longest nerves in the body,” explains Dr. Zonszein. These nerves go from the spine to the toes, which is why the feet get affected before the arms or hands. Diabetic neuropathy also tends to be bilateral. “Both feet will be affected equally,” he says. If blood sugar remains poorly controlled, it can lead to serious complications. In the feet, diabetic neuropathy can not only cause numbness but pain and injuries. It can change the shape of your feet, deforming them so they no longer fit into regular shoes. It can also dry out and damage your skin, cause calluses and ulcers on your feet, and interfere with circulation. The numbness also makes it hard to tell if there is a cut or injury which can increase your risk of infections and amputation. People with diabetes are also at an increased risk for amputation. In 2010, approximately 73,000 non-traumatic lower-limb amputations were performed on adults (20 years or older) diagnosed with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. The good news is that most amputations are preventable when you manage your diabetes well, take good care of your feet, and wear proper footwear. If you have circulatory problems or you’ve alre Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Conditions

Diabetic Foot Conditions

What are diabetic foot conditions? Diabetic foot conditions can develop in people with diabetes from having too much blood sugar, called glucose, in their system. This can lead to serious complications, including in the feet, where nerves can be damaged and the flow of blood reduced. Damaged nerves may keep someone with diabetes from feeling a simple injury, while reduced blood flow could keep the injury from healing or resisting infection—both of which could lead to the loss of a foot or leg to amputation. Nerve damage that is caused by uncontrolled diabetes is called neuropathy, which typically affects the feet and legs. Neuropathy occurs over time as damaged nerves stop sending signals, or sends them too slowly or at the wrong times. This can cause tingling, burning, or weakness in the legs and feet, but it can also stop you from feeling pain, heat, or cold. This loss of feeling means you could have a pebble in your shoe that causes a sore, but you don't feel it, leading to infection or worse. Neuropathy can also lead to foot deformities or changes in the muscles, bones, and shape of your feet. Poor blood flow (or circulation) to the arms and legs is called peripheral artery disease (PAD). If you have diabetes, PAD can make it hard for a sore or infection to heal, which can lead to the development of skin ulcers or gangrene, the death of skin and tissue due to lack of blood. Most often, PAD affects the legs, causing intermittent claudication, which is basically leg pain when walking. PAD can also cause changes in the shape of your feet and toes, leading to other problems. Common problems that can affect feet and lead to complications include: athlete's foot, which is a fungus that can enter through cracks in the skin that causes itching, redness and cracking; it ca Continue reading >>

Sensitive Feet And Diabetes: Why My Feet Hurt?

Sensitive Feet And Diabetes: Why My Feet Hurt?

What is nerve damage from diabetes? Diabetic neuropathies are nerve damage caused by diabetes. Neuropathy is one of the most common long term complications of diabetes. It can occur anywhere in the body, and in any organ. Symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and loss of protective sensation can be found in the hands, arms, fingers, feet, legs, toes, and lips. You may also have symptoms of nerve damage in the digestive system (gastroparesis), in the heart, or in sexual organs (erectile dysfunction, or vaginal dryness). In this article, we will be mainly looking at peripheral neuropathy in the feet, also commonly known as sensitive feet. What are sensitive feet? Patients complain about numbness and tingling in their feet and toes, or elsewhere, with a frequency that is more often than in similar reports of other diabetes complications they experience. It’s no wonder these patients with diabetes have complaints of neuropathy symptoms. Other than the tingling sensation or the numbness usually associated with neuropathy, those who have it complain about how much it hurts to put their socks and shoes on. The skin is sensitive to touch, to a point where one can’t even brush up against anything. It is likened to an over-sensitivity and mild pain that is uncomfortable. If it goes on day in and day out, it can be frustrating. Sometimes, a person with diabetes may also get other related foot problems, such as plantar fasciitis. This condition affects the heel of the foot, and can be extremely painful. You will find it too sore to walk with plantar fasciitis. Even without heel problems, the generalized foot pain and soreness can become severe. It has been found that as many as 60 to 70% of people with diabetes have neuropathy somewhere in their body. The longer you have diabete Continue reading >>

Other Neuropathy Causes Besides Diabetes

Other Neuropathy Causes Besides Diabetes

There are many situations where a problem on the surface could be caused by a number of factors going on underneath. An unsafe bridge could be due to poor construction, age, or amount of traffic over time. Cavities in your teeth could be caused by what you eat, failing to floss, and poor brushing habits. Neuropathy is a serious foot condition in which nerves become damaged. It is widely known to be associated with diabetes but there are actually several neuropathy causes. Neuropathy is a complication that can develop within several different medical conditions. The dominant symptom is nerve damage, which affects your ability to feel heat, cold, and pain. This loss of sensation puts a person at high risk for injury, making it imperative that you control the problem and do everything possible to prevent future damage. At the root of this is finding out what is damaging the nerves in the first place. Peripheral neuropathy can affect autonomic nerves, motor nerves, and sensory nerves. Patients often complain of tingling sensations, burning, and numbness. While diabetes is the leading cause of this condition, which often manifests in the lower extremity, there are several other factors, which include: chronic liver disease, chronic kidney disease, HIV infection, Vitamin B deficiency, cancer, Lyme disease, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and excessive alcohol use. If you are feeling any of the symptoms mentioned above, we strongly encourage you to seek medical treatment and find out what is happening. After the root cause is identified, the proper treatment can begin to reduce your risk of any future nerve damage. Don’t ignore symptoms. If they are due to a life-threatening disease, they are the clues to show that you need to take action. Contact Dr. Kevin Powers in Bloomingto Continue reading >>

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