diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Numbness In Legs

Diabetic Nerve Problems

Diabetic Nerve Problems

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage the covering on your nerves or the blood vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include Shooting pains, burning, or tingling Nausea, vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea Problems with sexual function Urinary problems Dizziness when you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling your blood sugar can help prevent nerve problems, or keep them from getting worse. Treatment may include pain relief and other medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy | Western Washington Medical Group

Diabetic Neuropathy | Western Washington Medical Group

If youre one of 29 million people living with diabetes, youre at risk of diabetic neuropathy, a condition caused by diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy occurs for several reasons that are all related to the long-term damage caused by extended periods of high blood sugar. Before going into the specific causes and implications of diabetic neuropathy, its important to first have a top-level understanding of diabetes and its effects on the body. Diabetes, in short, is the inability to manage changing levels of blood glucose, or blood sugar levels in the body. Problems arise when the body has trouble maintaining the balance of blood glucose levels, and must be treated. Type 1 Diabetes: The pancreas, the organ responsible for producing insulin, has difficulty producing enough insulin for the body due to damaged cells in the pancreas. Insulin is necessary for blood sugar regulation, and without it, blood sugar spikes occur causing unstable and damaging conditions in the body. Type 2 Diabetes: The pancreas produces enough insulin, but the cells reject the insulin. When this happens, the body creates an overproduction of insulin, and eventually, the pancreas ends up overworked and damaged. For more on Diabetes and blood sugar monitoring, read our previous blog, Blood Glucose Monitoring: Why and How? With diabetes, the body has difficulty recovering from high blood sugar spikes (after a meal, drink, or sugary snack), leading to extended periods of high blood sugar in the bloodstream. Over time, these high levels of blood sugar can damage nerves in the body. This nerve damage caused by diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy, and the signs and symptoms vary for each one. Many people experience anywhere from one to many symptoms, and some Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Preventing And Reversing The Damage

Diabetic Neuropathy: Preventing And Reversing The Damage

Imagine living with the haunting possibility that one day, you may lose all feeling in your feet and that this lost sensation could ultimately lead to ulceration, infection, and even amputation of your unsalvageable limbs. This grim but very real condition is called diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease 60-70 percent of diabetics suffer some kind of nerve damage. That means as the number of type 2 diabetics continues to spiral out of control, we are facing a growing population suffering from pedal disasters like these. What’s tragic is that with all we now know about diabetes, many of these conditions are preventable and largely reversible when they do occur. To help you prevent DPN or reverse the damage if you are already suffering, in today’s blog I will review some of the issues that lead to the onset of the condition and outline some simple dietary measures and supplements you can take to properly support your feet and reverse the damage. Sadly, these conditions typically begin with one major medical assumption: Diabetes can be controlled by medicine alone. Controlling Diabetes with Medication: Can it Be Done? In my opinion, one of the biggest misconceptions in modern medicine is the assumption that diabetes can be controlled by medication alone. The truth is that it simply can’t be. Somehow our culture has developed this fantasy that people can eat anything they want, do no exercise, and any health complications will be resolved with a few pills or injections. Nothing could be further from the truth. On the surface it may appear that diabetes can be successfully treated with pharmaceuticals. Fasting blood sugar and hemoglobin A1C levels both seem to improve. And while these a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Management

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Management

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Symptoms: Patients can experience diabetic neuropathic pain from damaged nerves that can feel like sharp pain, burning, tingling or numbness in the arms/hands and legs/feet. Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Causes: Diabetic neuropathic pain is caused when there is a prolonged exposure to high blood sugar/glucose levels, causing nerve damage in the body. Other factors that may contribute to diabetic neuropathic pain include inflammation, genetic factors, smoking and alcohol abuse. There are different types of diabetic neuropathy causing different types of pain symptoms. You may have more than one type causing more than one type of diabetic neuropathic pain symptom as well. Most of the diabetic neuropathic pain symptoms do develop gradually and may not be noticeable until significant nerve injury is present. The different types of diabetic neuropathy are listed below. Numbness. Tingling and burning sensations that may be worse at night. Decreased ability to feel pain in the feet causing unnoticed injury that can progress to infections. Commonly, patient can develop ulcers and infection causing deformity and bone and joint pain. Pain with movement. Allodynia or pain to light touch. Weakness. Mononeuropathy also called Focal Neuropathy: This is typically seen more commonly in older adults. The pain symptoms from this condition can occur suddenly but tends to improve and resolve over a period of weeks to months. A specific nerve gets injured, often in the head, torso or leg, but there usually is no associated long-term injury. The pain symptoms of mononeuropathy include: Double vision, difficulty focusing, pain in one eye. Paralysis on one side of the face (Bell’s palsy). Pain in specific area of the leg, thigh or foot. Chest or abdominal pain that can s Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition caused by long-term high blood sugar levels, which causes nerve damage. Some people will not have any symptoms. But for others symptoms may be debilitating. Between 60 and 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms. Many people do not know that they have diabetes. People unaware of their diabetes may not know what’s causing some of the unusual sensations they’re experiencing. Nerve damage is the result of high levels of blood glucose over long periods of time. It isn’t entirely clear why high glucose levels damage nerves. A number of factors may play a role in nerve fiber damage. One possible component is the intricate interplay between the blood vessels and nerves, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other factors include high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and nerve inflammation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually first appears in the feet and legs, and may occur in the hands and arms later. A common symptom of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is numbness. Sometimes you may be unable to feel your feet while walking. Other times, your hands or feet will tingle or burn. Or it may feel like you’re wearing a sock or glove when you’re not. Sometimes you may experience sudden, sharp pains that feel like an electrical current. Other times, you may feel cramping, like when you’re grasping something like a piece of silverware. You also may sometimes unintentionally drop items you’re holding as a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Walking with a wobbly motion or even losing your balance can res Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy ? What Is A Neuropathic Ulcer And How Do You Treat It ?

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy ? What Is A Neuropathic Ulcer And How Do You Treat It ?

Diabetic Neuropathy What is diabetic neuropathy ? Diabetic neuropathy means damage of nerve fibres in people with diabetes. How the nerves are injured is not entirely clear but research suggests that high blood glucose changes the metabolism of nerve cells and causes reduced blood flow to the nerve. There are different types of nerves in the body. These can be grouped as : sensory (detect sensation such as heat, cold, pain) motor (contract muscles to control movement) autonomic (regulate functions we cannot control directly, such as heart rate and digestion) The most common type of diabetic neuropathy affects the nerves in the legs and is usually known as peripheral neuropathy. This is the type of neuropathy that causes foot problems. It affects mainly the sensory nerves although the motor and autonomic nerves can also be involved with important consequences. What problems can be caused by diabetic neuropathy ? Neuropathy can result in two sets of what superficially appear to be contradictory problems. Most patients who have neuropathy have one of these problems but some can be affected by both. loss of ability to feel pain and other sensation which leads to neuropathic ulceration. symptoms of pain, burning, pins and needles or numbness which lead to discomfort (see section on Painful Neuropathy). A typical neuropathic ulcer is shown in the figure below. Patients with neuropathy lose their sensation of pain. As a result, they exert a lot of pressure at one spot under the foot when they walk, building up a callus at that site without causing discomfort. The pressure becomes so high that eventually it causes breakdown of tissues and ulceration. The patient hardly notices any pain. Therefore a typical neuropathic ulcer is : painless surrounded by callus associated with goo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold Feet

Diabetes And Cold Feet

We’ve all heard of a bride or groom “getting cold feet” before walking down the aisle, but for people with diabetes, having cold feet takes on another meaning entirely. What causes cold feet? Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a form of nerve damage, is one of the most common causes of cold feet. About sixty to seventy percent of people with diabetes develop some form of neuropathy over time. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is actually the cause of all kinds of symptoms, including tingling, burning, or sensitivity to touch. Your feet might seem warm to the touch, but feel cold to you. Symptoms may worsen at night. Poor circulation is another common cause of cold feet. Poor circulation makes it more challenging for your heart to pump warm blood to your extremities, keeping your feet cooler than the rest of your body. Peripheral artery disease, caused by clogged arteries in your legs, can reduce circulation and lead to cold feet. This could be a sign of something more serious, like increased risk for heart attack or stroke, but your doctor can usually detect it by checking the pulse in your legs. Certain medications, particularly those that cause blood vessels to constrict, can cause cold feet. Popular medications associated with cold feet are those to treat blood pressure, migraine headaches, and head colds. Talk to your pharmacist if you start to experience cold feet after starting a particular medication. Hypothyroidism is a condition caused by an underactive thyroid. Low levels of thyroid hormone interfere with your body’s metabolism, contributing to reduced circulation and colder feet. Other causes of cold feet Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a neurological disorder that causes funny sensations in your legs when at rest, such as creeping, crawling, aching—and, so Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

There are a number of ways that diabetes damages the nerves, but they all seem related to blood sugar being too high for a long period of time. Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It is damage to the nerves which prevents an individual from feeling sensations such as pain. There are a number of ways that diabetes damages the nerves, but they all seem related to blood sugar being too high for a long period of time. Nerve damage caused by diabetes leads to numbness and sometimes pain and weakness in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Diabetes-related nerve damage can be painful, but it isn't severe pain in most cases and therefore commonly overlooked by the patient. There are four types of diabetic neuropathy: peripheral, autonomic, proximal, and focal. Peripheral neuropathy , the most common condition causes pain or loss of feeling in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Autonomic neuropathy can cause changes in digestion, bowel and bladder control problems, and erectile dysfunction, and it can affect the nerves that serve the heart and control blood pressure. Proximal neuropathy produces pain in the thighs and hips and weakness in the legs. Focal neuropathy can strike any nerve in the body, causing pain or weakness. The areas of the body most commonly affected by diabetic peripheral neuropathy are the feet and legs. Nerve damage in the feet can result in a loss of foot sensation, increasing your risk of foot problems. Injuries and sores on the feet may go unrecognized due to lack of sensation. Therefore, you should practice proper skin and foot care. Rarely, other areas of the body such as the arms, abdomen, and back may be affected. Symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy may include: Numbness (severe or long-term numbness can become permanent) In m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Conditions Affecting The Legs And Feet

Diabetic Conditions Affecting The Legs And Feet

The feet and legs are common sites for complications in people with diabetes, and for this reason good foot care is very important. Having diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels that supply your legs and feet. This puts affected people at increased risk of developing ulcers on the feet and legs which can become infected, and in the worst cases, develop gangrene (where the tissue dies, resulting in the need for amputation). Nerve damage An injury to the foot or leg can be painful, but in people suffering from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage due to diabetes) the sensations are dulled and minor injuries may go undetected and untreated, potentially leading to more serious damage. Loss of temperature sensation is also a significant risk factor for injury in people with diabetes. This can result in problems such as burns from hot water or sitting too close to a heater. Diabetic neuropathy can also result in damage to the joints, bones, muscles and structure of your feet. In addition to numbness, diabetic neuropathy can sometimes also result in unpleasant feelings such as tingling, pain and burning in the legs and feet. Poor circulation Circulatory disorders, particularly blocked arteries, commonly occur in the lower extremities of people with diabetes. If injured, areas with poor circulation heal badly and, if left unattended, such injuries may develop into ulcers or even become gangrenous. If blood supply is severely impaired, ulcers can occur even in the absence of injury. A lack of blood supply to the leg muscles can also lead to pain in the legs when walking, which typically comes on after walking a certain distance and is relieved by rest. This is known as intermittent claudication. Infection High blood sugar levels can increase your risk of infections. Sores Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy resulting from chronically high blood glucose can be one of the most frustrating and debilitating complications of diabetes because of the pain, discomfort and disability it can cause, and because available treatments are not uniformly successful. Some patients find some relief from this nerve damage or neuropathy by keeping blood sugars as closely controlled as possible, getting regular exercise and keeping their weight under control. Using non-narcotic pain relievers consistently throughout the day—rather than waiting until nighttime when symptoms can become more severe—also seems to help if pain is the major symptom. Surprisingly, clinicians have also found that certain antidepressants may be helpful and can take the edge off the pain of neuropathy. Although pain or numbness in the legs or feet may be the most common complaint from people diagnosed with neuropathy, it is not the only symptom of this complication. Neuropathy can cause a host of different types of symptoms, depending on whether nerves in the legs, gastrointestinal tract, or elsewhere in the body are affected. If you have any of these symptoms, neuropathy may be the culprit: inability to adequately empty the bladder of its contents, resulting in frequent infections; nausea, vomiting, abdominal fullness or bloating, diarrhea, or constipation; low blood pressure upon standing that causes fainting or dizziness; inability to lift the foot or new deformities of the foot, or foot ulcers; trouble achieving or maintaining an erection. Although physicians have found some medications and other treatments that help ease these symptoms in some people, prevention continues to be the key. "Hemoglobin A1C readings should ideally be at 7.0% or lower. Those that are consistently n Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

COULD I HAVE DIABETIC NEUROPATHY? If you have diabetes and feel numbness or tingling in your feet, that could mean you suffer from what’s called diabetic neuropathy. Keep reading to learn more about the causes and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy from the experts at FootSmart. WHAT IS DIABETIC NEUROPATHY? While many people know that diabetes affects blood sugar levels, it may also cause nerve damage in a pattern that first affects the hands and feet. That damage to the nervous system is called diabetic neuropathy, and it can have direct consequences on your feet. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy may not appear until many years after your diabetes is diagnosed. High blood sugar levels—also called hyperglycemia—can injure the walls of the blood vessels that nourish your nerves and result in nerve damage. That’s why controlling your blood sugar levels with the right medication, diet, and exercise is essential in helping prevent diabetic neuropathy. That nerve damage may result in painful tingling or burning sensations in your feet and legs. But even worse is when you experience decreased protective sensation in your feet—a condition called "peripheral neuropathy" where you become unaware of pressure, pain, heat, and cold. For example, if you develop calluses, fissures, and wounds in your feet without noticing them, your risk of foot and leg infections increases. In addition, motor nerves—the nerves that control your muscles—can be affected as diabetic neuropathy progresses. Combined with the decreased protective sensation, repetitive microtrauma (a series of small, unnoticed injuries) may result in joint damage to your feet and worsen over time. In severe cases, this condition may even lead to foot deformity, which doctors call Charcot neuroarthropathy. Think y Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Causes And Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy: Causes And Symptoms

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy—DPN for short—is diabetes-related damage to nerves that sit near the surface of your skin. DPN usually affects the feet and the hands, but can also harm nerves in arms and legs. Approximately 50 percent of people with type 2 diabetes and 20% of those with type 1 diabetes develop this kind of nerve damage.1 DPN can be extremely painful—or cause numbness so that you have little feeling, especially in your feet. DPN damages two different types of nerves close to the surface of your skin. DPN can affect small nerves that protect your body by sending signals about pain and temperature changes to your brain. This condition can also attack large nerves that detect touch, pressure and help you keep your balance. 2 Symptoms are different for each type. Most people with DPN have damage to both types of nerves. DPN usually affects extremities—feet, hands, legs and arms—where nerve fibers are the longest and most numerous. 3 Causes Experts are still investigating exactly how diabetes harms and kills these nerve cells. “The causes remain unknown,” the American Diabetes Association noted in a definitive 2017 review. One thing is certain: The conventional wisdom—that high blood sugar is the cause—is just part of the story. New research is revealing a bigger cast of culprits. These include high cholesterol, high triglycerides (another blood fat), high blood pressure, obesity and smoking, according to a British research report in a widely-cited 2005 study that tracked 1,172 people with diabetes for seven years. 4 The threats are major: Obesity and high triglycerides each doubled risk in people with diabetes in a 2013 University of Utah study of 218 people with type 2 diabetes. 5 Smoking increased risk by as much as 42% in a 2015 Harvard M Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetes can harm your nerves. That damage, called neuropathy, may be painful. It can happen in several ways, and they all seem to be related to blood sugar levels being too high for too long. To prevent it, work with your doctor to manage your blood sugar. You may hear your doctor mention the four types of diabetes-related neuropathy: peripheral, autonomic, proximal, and focal. Peripheral Neuropathy This type usually affects the feet and legs. Rare cases affect the arms, abdomen, and back. Symptoms include: Tingling Numbness (which may become permanent) Burning (especially in the evening) Pain Early symptoms usually get better when your blood sugar is under control. There are medications to help manage the discomfort. What you should do: Check your feet and legs daily. Use lotion on your feet if they're dry. Take care of your toenails. Ask your doctor if you should go to a podiatrist. Wear shoes that fit well. Wear them all the time, so your feet don't get injured. Autonomic Neuropathy This type usually affects the digestive system, especially the stomach. It can also affect the blood vessels, urinary system, and sex organs. In your digestive system: Symptoms include: Bloating Diarrhea Constipation Heartburn Nausea Vomiting Feeling full after small meals What you should do: You may need to eat smaller meals and take medication to treat it. In blood vessels: Symptoms include: Blacking out when you stand up quickly Faster heartbeat Dizziness Low blood pressure Nausea Vomiting Feeling full sooner than normal If you have it: Avoid standing up too quickly. You may also need to wear special stockings (ask your doctor about them) and take medicine. In Men: Symptoms include: He may not be able to have or keep an erection, or he may have “dry” or reduced ejaculations. What Continue reading >>

More in diabetes