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Diabetes Numbness In Legs

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetic neuropathy, which you may hear called diabetic nerve pain, is diabetes-related nerve damage. It develops over time; the longer you have diabetes, the more at risk you are for diabetic neuropathy. In fact, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases reports that 60% to 70% of people with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes will develop a type of diabetic nerve pain.1 There are 4 types of diabetic neuropathy: diabetic peripheral neuropathy (the most common type), proximal neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and focal neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is the most likely to cause pain, but proximal neuropathy can also cause pain. Diabetic Neuropathy Causes Even though the exact cause of diabetic neuropathies isn't fully understood, researchers in the medical community do know that poor blood glucose control (blood sugar) is related to the development of nerve damage. What they don't understand is how long-term exposure to high blood glucose levels leads to nerve damage. There is an idea that elevated blood glucose levels damage the blood vessels over time. Damaged blood vessels can't bring oxygen and nutrients to the nerves as well as they should be able to, eventually leading to nerve damage. Most likely, diabetic neuropathy develops because of a mix of factors: • Lifestyle: Smoking and excessive alcohol use can contribute to diabetic neuropathy. • Age: The longer you have diabetes, the more likely it is that you will develop diabetic neuropathy. • Nerve Injury: Your nerves can be injured because of other conditions, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, or they may be injured because of inflammation. Injured nerves may be more likely to develop diabetic neuropathy. • Autoimmune Factors: In autoimmune diseases, and type 1 diabetes is Continue reading >>

What Are The Treatments For Numb Feet In Diabetes?

What Are The Treatments For Numb Feet In Diabetes?

Numbness of the feet may be a symptom of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Diabetes damages the nerve endings, which leads to neuropathy. One type of diabetic neuropathy is peripheral neuropathy, which affects such body parts as the feet, legs and hands. Neuropathy is not curable, but proper treatment can help prevent the condition from becoming worse, according to a statement paper by the American Diabetic Association in the April 2005 issue of “Diabetes Care." Video of the Day Feet require special care among individuals with diabetes. Not only does diabetes damage nerve endings, the condition hinders the body’s ability to fight infections. Having numbness or reduced sensation in the feet may inhibit one’s awareness of feeling blisters or sores on the feet, which may easily lead to medical complications, such as foot ulcers, serious infections or amputations, according to a 2003 issue of “Lancet." To help prevent medical complications among individuals with numb feet, the American Diabetic Association advises checking feet daily for sores, blisters and cuts. Primary care providers and podiatrists can also check the feet during examinations. Also recommended is checking shoes for rough edges and small objects before putting them on. If foot sores are found, the American Diabetic Association advises seeking medical attention from a podiatrist or primary care provider. Diabetic neuropathy may get better with improved management of blood glucose levels, or blood sugar levels, according to the “Diabetes Care” article. Taking insulin or diabetes medication can help keep blood glucose levels within target range as established by a health care provider. Types of insulin include regular insulin, long-acting insulin and rapid-acting insulin. A health care provide Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (dpn)

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (dpn)

Definition Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy, also called distal symmetric neuropathy or sensorimotor neuropathy, is nerve damage in the arms and legs. Feet and legs are likely to be affected before hands and arms. Causes Diabetic peripheral neuropathy doesn’t emerge overnight. Instead, it usually develops slowly and worsens over time. Some patients have this condition long before they are diagnosed with diabetes. Having diabetes for several years may increase the likelihood of having diabetic neuropathy. The nerve damage that characterizes diabetic peripheral neuropathy is more common in patients with poorly managed diabetes. However, even diabetic patients who have excellent blood sugar (glucose) control can develop diabetic neuropathy. There are several theories as to why this occurs Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can It Be Reversed?

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can It Be Reversed?

Neuropathy refers to any condition that damages nerve cells. These cells play a critical role in touch, sensation, and movement. Diabetic neuropathy refers to damage of nerves that’s caused by diabetes. Scientists believe that the high content of blood sugar in the blood of a person with diabetes damages nerves over time. There are several different types of neuropathies. They include: Peripheral: Pain and numbness in the extremities including arms, feet, legs, hands, and toes Proximal: Pain and numbness in the upper legs, specifically the buttocks, thighs, and hips Autonomic: Damage to nerves of the autonomic nervous system which control sexual response, sweating, urinary and digestive function Focal: Sudden loss of function in nerves causing pain and weakness of the muscles Neuropathy is one of the common effects of diabetes. It’s estimated that 60-70 percent of people with diabetes will develop some sort of neuropathy throughout their lives. By 2050, it’s estimated that over 48 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with diabetes. That means in the future, anywhere from 28-33 million Americans could be affected by diabetic neuropathy. Nerve damage from diabetes cannot be reversed. This is because the body can’t naturally repair nerve tissues that have been damaged. However, researchers are investigating methods to treat nerve damage caused by diabetes. While you cannot reverse the damage from neuropathy, there are ways to help manage the condition, including: lowering your blood sugar treating nerve pain regularly checking your feet to make sure they are free of injury, wounds, or infection Controlling your blood glucose is important because it can help prevent additional damage to your nerves. You can better control your blood glucose through Continue reading >>

Numbness In Legs | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Numbness In Legs | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I suffer from Type2 Diabetes since 2008, for about 2 months I've had numbness in my legs, more in one leg then the other. There is some numbness in my hands. They feel hollow, difficulty walking, like can't control them properly. It's best to see your doc about it as it could be a symptom for a number of things. For me personally I get numbness in my left ankle and foot but it is because I have 3 bulging discs in my lumbar spine and one of them is leaning on my sciatic nerve. So I at least know the cause of mine. I wish you the best in finding answers to what is going on. All new symptoms should be reported to your primary health care professional. How are your glucose levels? As has been said, not everything should be put down to Diabetes, better get that numbness investigated. Good Luck. hi sorry to hear that. I suffer exactly the same and have had nerve conduction tests etc. read up on peripheral neuropathy and diabetic neuropathy. I am type 2 undiagnosed for a few years and this is nerve damage I believe caused by diabetes. I have been told there's no cure only controlled by good diabetic control. this is only my opinion by what I've been told by consultant but unfortunately with everything concerned with diabetes even the professionals don't know! please let me know if you are advised or told anything different ? good luck All new symptoms should be reported to your primary health care professional. How are your glucose levels? As has been said, not everything should be put down to Diabetes, better get that numbness investigated. Good Luck. Not great, pretty high. I had blood tests in October, best ever, HbA1c levl - 52 and not so great fasting g Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Problems)

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Problems)

Diabetic neuropathy, a nerve disorder, is a complication of diabetes that can lead to problems throughout your body. If you have diabetes, you can develop nerve problems at any time. Significant nerve problems, or clinical neuropathy, can develop within the first 10 years after receiving a diabetes diagnosis. The risk of developing neuropathy increases the longer you have diabetes. About half of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. Although the exact causes of diabetic neuropathy are unknown, several factors may contribute to the disorder, including the following: High blood glucose. High blood glucose causes chemical changes in nerves and impairs the nerves' ability to transmit signals. It also has the potential to damage blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to the nerves. Inherited factors. There are some genetic traits that may make some people more susceptible to nerve disease than others. The following are the most common symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms include: Numbness in the hands or feet Pain in the hands, feet, or legs Problems with internal organs, such as the digestive tract, heart, or sexual organs causing the following: Indigestion Dizziness Bladder infections Weakness Weight loss The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your doctor for a diagnosis. Diffuse neuropathy is neuropathy that affects many parts of the body, and includes the following: Diffuse peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy affecting nerves in the extremities (legs, feet, arms, and hands).Symptoms include: Numbness Tingling, burning, or prickling Sharp pains or cramps Extreme sensitivity to touch Loss of balance or coordination Insensitivit Continue reading >>

Healing Numb Feet

Healing Numb Feet

Overview of treatment approaches: • Nondrug therapies • Relaxation and biofeedback • Anodyne therapy • Exercise • Massage • Daily foot care Diabetes is hard on feet. Because the feet are farthest from the heart, any problems with blood flow can leave feet without enough circulation. Results can include numbness, loss of foot strength, and worse. Fortunately, there are some good ways to heal and protect your feet. As Birgitta I. Rice, MS, RPh, CHES, wrote here, much of the pain and numbness people with diabetes experience comes from nerve damage. The nerves are injured both by poor circulation and by high glucose levels. We really need healthy nerves. (As a person with a nerve disease, I know about this.) According to Rice, “Loss of nerve fibers can result in muscle weakness, numbness, loss of reflexes, foot deformities, change in gait, and impaired balance and coordination. Loss of sensitivity to pain or temperature can also occur, leading in turn to blisters and sores from foot injuries that go unfelt.” Numbness is dangerous. Sometimes, people can have a pebble in their shoe and not notice it. Others may get in a hot bath and not realize their feet are being scalded. These kinds of seemingly minor things can lead to infections, which don’t heal because of having poor circulation. This is the major pathway to losing a leg to amputation. People with diabetes are eight times more likely than other people to have a lower leg amputated. If you just woke up one day with numb feet, you would notice a big difference and ask about ways to treat it. It doesn’t work that way, though. Numbness comes on slowly over years, so you don’t notice day-to-day changes. Also, severe pain often comes before numbness, so that the numbness is perceived as a relief rather Continue reading >>

By Lawrence Wilson, Md

By Lawrence Wilson, Md

DIABETES,HYPOGLYCEMIA AND PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY I find thathypoglycemia and diabetes are closely related, extremely common, and often gounrecognized and undiagnosed.  Asan experiment, Dr. Robert Atkins, MD, tested everyone who walked through hisoffice door for any reason with a 5-hour glucose tolerance test.   Today the situation is probably farworse.  I would estimate that over90% of the American population has a disturbed glucose metabolism, thanks totoo much stress, eating sugars, vitamin and mineral deficiencies and the presenceof excessive toxic metals.             Whilethe exact mechanisms are not clear, diabetes, in particular, is associated withperipheral neuropathy. This simply means tingling, numbness orother unusual sensations in the nerves of the extremities – the arms andthe legs.  I believe this is themost important cause for these common symptoms. Diabetes difficult to detect in its earlystages.  Most of the time, theperson has not been diagnosed with diabetes or hypoglycemia. The main reason for this is that early diabetesis not easy to diagnose.  Simpleblood or urine tests for sugar, or even for insulin, are not sufficient.   The only recognized medical test is a5-hour glucose tolerance test.  This test iscumbersome to perform, for which reason it is not used as much as it mightbe.  Also, doctors sometimesdisagree on which results constitute a case of diabetes.   The test is not always definitivebecause diabetes and hypoglycemia are not simple conditions.   They are gradual, progressive disordersthat may come and go with stress, dietary habits, and perhaps other factorssuch as fatigue, pregnancy or even the time of the month for menstruatingwomen. As a result,most people are completely unaware of any problem at all.   Early sig Continue reading >>

Mysterious Pain Or Numbness In Your Arms Or Legs?

Mysterious Pain Or Numbness In Your Arms Or Legs?

It could be a sign of peripheral neuropathy Have you ever felt pain or numbness in your hands, legs or feet? This can be caused by a condition called peripheral neuropathy (PN), a form of nerve damage. PN is relatively common—about 20 million Americans have it—and most people associate it with diabetes. But there are literally hundreds of forms of PN. The condition can be caused by athletic injuries, repetitive motions and autoimmune diseases. Continual pressure on one part of the body (from using crutches, for example) or a ligament compression (such as carpal tunnel syndrome) also can cause PN, as can exposure to toxic chemicals. Even hormonal changes in women could be the cause. What you need to know… About one-third of neuropathy patients also have diabetes. And up to 70% of people with diabetes will eventually develop PN. Elevated blood sugar damages vessels carrying blood to the extremities, causing PN. The highest risk for PN is in people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Other causes of PN… Nerve entrapment injuries. Activities involving repetitive motions—for example, typing, working a cash register or riding a bike—are a common cause of nerve inflammation and damage. You should suspect a local injury if you have symptoms in just one area (mononeuropathy). Patients who have diabetes or other systemic diseases are more likely to have damage to multiple nerves (polyneuropathy). Vitamin B-12 deficiency damages the coating that surrounds and protects nerves (the myelin sheath), which can lead to PN. Between 10% and 25% of older adults are deficient in B-12 because of an age-related decline in intrinsic factor, a protein that’s needed for absorption of the vitamin. Autoimmune diseases (such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis) can cause the im Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

DEAR DOCTOR K: I have peripheral neuropathy. I know that people with diabetes often get neuropathy, but I'm not diabetic. What else can cause this condition? And what can I do about it? DEAR READER: Neuropathy is a medical term that means nerve damage. The type of nerve damage that people with diabetes get involves specific nerve fibers in all nerves, particularly the nerves that travel to the legs and feet. (There are other conditions in which a single nerve leading to the legs and feet is pinched, causing pain. An example is what is often called a "slipped disk" or "herniated disk" in the lower part of the spine). The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include numbness and tingling. Some cases cause burning, shooting or stabbing pain. When the doctor does a physical examination and touches your feet and lower legs with something as light as a feather (like some cotton), you may not feel it. However, you will feel it if the cotton touches your skin in the thigh or elsewhere in the body. You may also lose sensation to a pinprick in the lower legs and feet, but not the rest of you. Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy. But neuropathy can result from other causes as well. These include: -- Excessive alcohol intake. -- Hypothyroidism. In this condition, the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. -- Amyloidosis, a disease in which an abnormal protein accumulates in the body. -- Vitamin deficiencies, particularly vitamin B1, B12 and folate deficiency. -- Critical illness, particularly if you develop a severe inflammatory response to infection. -- Guillain-Barre syndrome. This uncommon autoimmune disorder damages the peripheral nerves. Diagnosing peripheral neuropathy is best done by electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS Continue reading >>

Types Of Neuropathy In Hands, Legs & Feet Premier Physical Therapy

Types Of Neuropathy In Hands, Legs & Feet Premier Physical Therapy

Nerve pain can leave people unable to perform day-to-day activities and can seriously hinder peoples quality of life. Unfortunately, this type of pain can take time to diagnose and pinpoint, which is why it is important to see your doctor at the first sign of symptoms. The sooner you can catch nerve damage the better your chances are at preventing or minimizing neuropathic pain. Neuropathy is a broad diagnosis covering different, more specific causes and Neuropathy diagnoses. You may have read our blog What Is Neuropathy and discovered that you do in fact have symptoms on Neuropathy. Here, well go more in detail about the types of Neuropathy that you may have. Peripheral Neuropathy (Non-Diabetic Neuropathy) Peripheral Neuropathy creates the pain symptoms of numbness, burning, tingling, etc in your extremities, most commonly hands and feet. However, it can include arms, feet, fingers, hands, legs, and toes. Peripheral Neuropathy means the nerve damage occurred to the peripheral nervous system, which affects the nerves on the outside of the spine and brain. Mononeuropathy Nerve damage, pain, and malfunctions on a singular nerve or nerve trunk. Some examples of Mononeuropathy are Carpel Tunnel, Sciatic Nerve Dysfunction, Femoral Nerve Dysfunction and Cubital Tunnel Syndrome. Unlike most neuropathies, this one is most often caused by injury. Diabetic Neuropathy Diabetic Neuropathy is non-reversible damage to the nervous system because of Diabetes. The damage creates malfunctions in the nerves which translates to burning, tingling, numbness, and weakness in the extremities (primarily hands and feet). Some estimate Diabetes Patients suffer from Neuropathy 50-70% of the time. The better a patient can manage their Diabetes the more they will be able to manage their Neuropathy. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy, a nerve disorder, is a complication of diabetes that can lead to problems throughout the body. Persons with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but significant clinical neuropathy can develop within the first 10 years after receiving a diabetes diagnosis. The risk of developing neuropathy increases the longer a person has diabetes. About half of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. What causes diabetic neuropathy? Although the exact causes of diabetic neuropathy are unknown, several factors may contribute to the disorder, including the following: high blood glucose High blood glucose causes chemical changes in nerves and impairs the nerves' ability to transmit signals. It also has the potential to damage blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to the nerves. inherited factors There are some genetic traits that may make some people more susceptible to nerve disease than others. What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy? The following are the most common symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms include: numbness in the hands or feet pain in the hands, feet, or legs problems with internal organs such as the digestive tract, heart, or sexual organs causing the following: indigestion diarrhea or constipation dizziness bladder infections impotence weakness weight loss depression The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis. What are the different types of diabetic neuropathy? Diffuse neuropathy is neuropathy that affects many parts of the body, and includes the following: diffuse peripheral neuropathy - neuropathy affecting nerves in the extre Continue reading >>

Numbness In Feet, But No Diabetes? Heres What Else It Could Be

Numbness In Feet, But No Diabetes? Heres What Else It Could Be

Numbness in the feet is one of the most common complications of diabetes but there are many other reasons why your feet may feel numb. Even if youre not diabetic, you can still suffer from this problem. Here are some of the possible causes. Several conditions can cause foot numbness when not enough blood is getting through to your feet. This is likely to be especially noticeable at the tips of your toes, and sometimes also at the backs of your heels. A podiatrist will be able to give you further information. If your arteries or veins have become narrowed, blocked, or tangled, you may lose some feeling in your feet. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can be caused by sitting in a cramped space , such as an airline seat, for long periods. If your feet get extremely cold, especially for long periods of time, this can give you frostbite and make you lose feeling. Your feet may go numb if you have suffered certain types of injury or disease. Because of the way your bodys nerves work, some conditions that affect other areas of your body can also cause numbness, so it may not be a foot injury that is the root cause. Many back injuries, such as slipped disks or brittle bone disease, can cause your feet to become numb. You can also get foot numbness if you have a trapped nerve, for example from sitting awkwardly for too long. If you have a broken bone that is supported by a cast, making the cast too tight can cause numbness. You can experience numbness if the nerves inside your feet stop working properly. There are many possible causes of this type of damage, so its important that you get advice from a podiatrist to make sure that you receive the correct treatment. If you dont get enough Vitamin B12, your feet can go numb. People on vegan diets are most at risk for this problem. Some b Continue reading >>

Diabetic Conditions Affecting The Legs And Feet

Diabetic Conditions Affecting The Legs And Feet

The feet and legs are common sites for complications in people with diabetes, and for this reason good foot care is very important. Having diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels that supply your legs and feet. This puts affected people at increased risk of developing ulcers on the feet and legs which can become infected, and in the worst cases, develop gangrene (where the tissue dies, resulting in the need for amputation). Nerve damage An injury to the foot or leg can be painful, but in people suffering from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage due to diabetes) the sensations are dulled and minor injuries may go undetected and untreated, potentially leading to more serious damage. Loss of temperature sensation is also a significant risk factor for injury in people with diabetes. This can result in problems such as burns from hot water or sitting too close to a heater. Diabetic neuropathy can also result in damage to the joints, bones, muscles and structure of your feet. In addition to numbness, diabetic neuropathy can sometimes also result in unpleasant feelings such as tingling, pain and burning in the legs and feet. Poor circulation Circulatory disorders, particularly blocked arteries, commonly occur in the lower extremities of people with diabetes. If injured, areas with poor circulation heal badly and, if left unattended, such injuries may develop into ulcers or even become gangrenous. If blood supply is severely impaired, ulcers can occur even in the absence of injury. A lack of blood supply to the leg muscles can also lead to pain in the legs when walking, which typically comes on after walking a certain distance and is relieved by rest. This is known as intermittent claudication. Infection High blood sugar levels can increase your risk of infections. Sores Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

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