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Diabetes Nosebleeds

"nosebleeds": Diabetes Community - Support Group

These message boards are closed to posting. Please head onover to our new WebMD Message Boards to check out and participate in the greatconversations taking place: Your new WebMD Message Boards are now open! 1. Head over to this page: 2. Choose the tag from the drop-down menu thatclicks most with you (and add it to any posts you create so others can easilyfind and sort through posts) Sorry should have made this all one post. I have also been experiencing a lot of nosebleeds lately. Does that have any relationship to my diabetes?? Also do any of you take a vitamin regimen or fish oil and do u find that helps somewhat? If so what do u take. Your reply violates WebMD's rules. The issue ishighlighted in red. Please correct the issue, then click Submit. Post my content anonymously (without my username) Put this on my watchlist and alert me by email to new posts I doubt there is a correlation between your diabetes and frequent nosebleeds. At my doctor's recommendation, I take a daily multivitamin, a vitamin formulation to support eye health, and a thiamine (vitamin B-1) supplement (because I am a recovering alcoholic and was B-1 deficient). I also take fish oil supplements twice per day (AM and PM) with the approval of my doctor. None of these vitamins or fish oil supplements are intended to help with glycemic control or to prevent nosebleeds. We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. One other thing. Is your blood pressure in good control? Sometimes, nosebleeds can be caused by high blood pressure. It is not a common cause, but it can happen. We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. betaquartz replied to DavidHueben ' Continue reading >>

Pets With Diabetes: Princess's Story

Pets With Diabetes: Princess's Story

story is about diabetes management complications which are caused by other problems. Even though her diabetes couldn't be regulated, it wasn't the diabetes that took her life. But if it wasn't for the diabetes, we might have been able to prolong her life a bit longer. I hope our story won't be discouraging to others, but other owners should know that it's possible that other problems can interfere with the diabetes treatment, regardless of how much effort is put into it. Princess and I shared many wonderful years together. I adopted her in late October 1987, when she was, I was told, 1-1/2 years. Due to stress and worms, she hardly ate at first, and was close to being force fed. After a couple of weeks of care, I offered her some tuna salad, which she ate out of the container. Soon after, she was eating dog food out of her bowl.Eight months later, we were joined by 6 week old kittens Bootsie and Gizmo.Even though Princess was jealous of any attention I gave them, she was a good momma to them... their idea, which you can below.Four years later, kitten Sassy joined us and raised havoc in what once was a harmonious home. Except for minor skin problems, Princess remained in good health for almost eight years. Princess was attacked by a neighbor dog. While she recovered, this marked the beginning of her serious health problems. During a follow-up exam that November, a pea-size malignant growth was found in one of her anal glands, and removed along with the gland. She didn't tolerate well the 3 rounds of chemotherapy which followed. At the time of the surgery, Princess' kidney values (BUN and Creatinine) were borderline, and I began feeding her kidney diet food, along with W/D which she needed to keep her stools firm. Once over the effects of the chemo, Princess' stayed in r Continue reading >>

Nosebleeds Can Be An Early Warning Sign To More Serious Health Problems

Nosebleeds Can Be An Early Warning Sign To More Serious Health Problems

Nosebleeds Can Be an Early Warning Sign to More Serious Health Problems HEALTH experts have warned that frequent nosebleeds could be a sign of much more serious medical conditions. While nosebleeds are common in pregnancy, for those on blood- thinning drugs and as a result of injuries and allergies, frequent bleeding could be an early sign of serious problems. And a host of other minor ailments, including swollen ankles, headaches and moles, can also act as vital warnings of health concerns. Regular nosebleeds can be an indication of high blood pressure, the bleeding disorder haemophilia and, in rare cases, nose cancer. Research suggests one in four people suffer regular nosebleeds but around 74 per cent of them are unaware of how serious they could be. Roddy Morrison, chairman of the Haemophilia Society, said: Some 20,000 people in the UK are diagnosed with a bleedingdisorder. Warning However, it is estimated that a further one per cent of the population remains undiagnosed. Nosebleeds are just one of the bodys many early warning signals. Heres our guide to knowing what your body is trying to tell you. The thunderclap headache is a severe sudden headache which reaches maximum intensity within a minute and lasts between an hour and 10 days. They could be nothing to worry about or a symptom of minor problems such as sinus infections. But in some instances, it can be caused by bleeding on the brain, an unruptured aneurysm or other blood vessel problems. A headache that occurs during sex could also, on occasion, indicate something much more serious, like a stroke or haemorrhage. Sharp, stabbing headaches caused by bending, coughing, laughing or sneezing could just be increasing blood pressure but, if they are frequent, severe or lengthy, they could point to problems such Continue reading >>

Nose Bleeds After Bcp-pzi Started? Just A Coincidence

Nose Bleeds After Bcp-pzi Started? Just A Coincidence

This is a little strange. I started BCP-PZI about two weeks ago, a switch from Levimer. Levimer wasn't bad, and maybe I shouldn't have messed with something that was working, but after reading about BCP-PZI I just had to try and see if it would be better. The numbers swing much more radically with BCP-PZI (everything on paper now and nothing in the computer, sorry) and even at 3 shots a day the best I can get is highs between 250-300 with lows at 80 - 90. It is really a roller coaster and with Silky it almost resembles Vetsulin, which I first started out with a couple years ago. I will probably be going back to Levimer after consulting with the Vet, it was by far much longer lasting and smoother. Shame on me for upsetting the apple cart. Here is my question though: My Silky baby never had a nose bleed in the 8 years I have had her. She is estimated by the vets to be about 16-17 years old. We really have no way of knowing her age for sure. Two weeks ago, when I made the switch from Levimer to BCP-PZI, she started having nose bleeds. About 4 or 5 in the last two weeks. She has a sneezing attack and then blood is flowing from her nostril and sometimes sprayed into the food bowl. I have taken some photos because over these two weeks I have noticed scratch patterns on the fur right above her nostrils signifying she has been scratching her nose. I am open to any and all speculation and advice. I just called the vet. Vet not in till morning. I will call back in morning and inform him and see if I need to bring her in to have looked at. Allergic reaction to the BCP-PZI? Is there such a thing when it comes to insulin? I thought I knew all of this feline diabetes subject well and have been doing fine by it for a couple years now, but I realize I will never know it all and here I Continue reading >>

Nosebleeds In Pregnancy

Nosebleeds In Pregnancy

Nosebleeds are quite common in pregnancy because of hormonal changes. They can be frightening, butthere's nothing to worry about as long as you don't lose a lot of blood, and theycan often be treated at home. During a nosebleed, blood flows from one or both nostrils. It can be heavy or light and last from a few seconds to more than 10 minutes. Nosebleeds can happen when you're asleep.You might feel liquid in the back of your throat before blood comes out of your nose if you're lying down. During pregnancy, you may also find that your nose gets more blocked up than usual. Sit down and firmly pinch the soft part of your nose, just above your nostrils, for 10 to 15 minutes without releasing the pressure. Lean forward and breathe through your mouth. This will drain blood down your nose instead of down the back of your throat. Sit or stand upright, rather than lying down, as this reduces the blood pressure in the veins of your nose and will discourage further bleeding. Place a covered ice pack, or a packet of frozen peas wrapped in a tea towel, on the bridge of your nose. If the bleeding doesn't stop, seek medical advice call your midwife or GP urgently. Avoid blowing your nose, bending down and strenuous activity for at least 12 hours after a nosebleed. Talkto your midwife or GP if you're worried about your nosebleeds. Learnmore about nosebleeds , including tips for preventing nosebleeds, and readabout other common pregnancy problems . Continue reading >>

Nosebleeds Causes - Mayo Clinic

Nosebleeds Causes - Mayo Clinic

Alter H. Approach to the adult with epistaxis. Accessed June 5, 2015. Messner AH. Management of epistaxis in children. Accessed June 5, 2015. Messner AH. Epidemiology and etiology of epistaxis in children. Accessed June 5, 2015. Messner AH. Evaluation of epistaxis in children. Accessed June 5, 2015. Ferri FF. Epistaxis. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015: 5 Books in 1. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2015. Accessed June 5, 2015. Marx JA, et al. Otolaryngology. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2014. Accessed June 5, 2015. Nosebleeds. American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. Accessed June 5, 2015. Wilkinson JM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 24, 2018. Continue reading >>

Nose Bleeds - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Nose Bleeds - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. For the past few weeks, ive had a nose bleed every day. Out of my left nostral. Sometimes its a large flow, sometiems i just whipe my nose and see blood. What could be wrong? i hadnt had any for liek 8 years, untill a few weeks ago, now there really common. Diabetes realated? or soething else? Help I wouldn't like to hazard a guess as to whether this is diabetes related since I don't really know how long I have had diabetes (diagnosed in Dec 2004) or how long I was in a pre-diabetic state. But what I can tell you is that ever since adolescence, I have suffered bouts of nosebleeds - just as you describe. Sometimes they last a week or two, sometimes shorter. Sometimes there is a gap of years between bouts, sometimes months. I haven't tied them down to anythng. The only thing that my Dr can say is that I must have a weak vein and if it ever caused a serious problem (i.e. the bleed doesn't stop) then the answer is for it to be cauterised. I stop my bleeds in a couple of minutes by stuffing tissue up my nostril. I think this happens, sometimes, when there is a lot of change in temperature or when the air is very dry. It tends to dry out the inside of your nose and even blowing your nose can cause it to bleed. I'm concerned that it might be caused by high blood pressure. My grandmother had a lot of problems with nose bleeds when her blood pressure was up. I have never had nosebleeds, I live in Colorado where for some people they are very common, even after climbing 14000 feet I didnt have one, I would say it isnt diabetes related, you should try to think of other things that could have caused it. I Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with no history of any kind of diabetes in her life. Like the general form, the gestational type is characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels [1]. High glucose levels in the blood can be dangerous both for the mother and child. Gestational diabetes is usually diagnosed later in pregnancy; so, if you have diabetes in the first trimester that often means you have had it before getting pregnant [2]. Gestational Diabetes Classification Gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM (common) [3] Gestational diabetes insipidus or GDI (rare) [4] What causes diabetes during pregnancy? Researches are still being carried out to find the exact factors triggering high blood glucose levels in pregnancy. But, the hormonal and other changes occurring in your body are known to be responsible for the problem. Certain genetic factors have also been recognized to play a role in some cases [5]. Pathophysiology of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The body changes during pregnancy make your body somewhat resistant to insulin [6]. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to help your body use glucose for producing energy. The reduced functioning of insulin during pregnancy causes glucose build up in the blood, leading to diabetes. Gestational diabetes is more likely to occur late in the second trimester or during the third trimester as the pregnancy hormone levels gradually becomes higher with the advancement of your pregnancy [7]. What are the risk factors for gestational diabetes? Being overweight before conceiving Being over 25 years of age [7] History of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Family history of type 2 diabetes Carrying twins A tendency to have high blood glucose levels, but not hi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes tends to start when people are under 25, although it can be diagnosed later in life. With Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. When glucose can't enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body's cells literally starve to death. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood glucose levels. The cause of Type 1 diabetes is unknown but it is thought to be an autoimmune disease, where the body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Not all diabetes in children and teenagers is the kind called Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is being seen increasingly in young people. Where Type 1 diabetes always requires insulin, Type 2 can require insulin but often it can be treated with other medicines such as tablets. This section deals only with young people who have Type 1 diabetes. We have talked to a range of young people who've lived with Type 1 diabetes from those who were very young when they were first diagnosed to those who were diagnosed when they were teenagers. We have also talked to some young people only recently diagnosed. In this section young people talk about the signs and symptoms that prompted them to seek medical help. Signs of diabetes Most people remembered that the first symptoms of diabetes had crept up on them over weeks or even months- most had felt thirsty all the time and said that they started to drink more and more and found that they were unable to quench their thirst. Lots of people described realising something must be wrong wi Continue reading >>

Nosebleeds | Mass. Eye And Ear

Nosebleeds | Mass. Eye And Ear

Epistaxis or nosebleeds are very common and can occur for a variety of reasons. The inside lining of the nose has a rich blood supply, with blood vessels located very close to the surface. When these vessels break, it can cause the nose to bleed. Most of the time, a nosebleed resolves on their own. Keeping your head elevated and a constant pinching the front of your nose (like you are diving underwater) for 15 to 20 minutes will help control the bleeding. In dry climates (such as the Northeast during winter months), the lining of the nasal cavity in front of the nose may become too dry and damage the blood vessels. Preventing this with humidifiers in the home can be helpful and also reduce frequency of upper respiratory infections. When the bleeding is aggressive and persists beyond the above measures, patients should seek emergency care. In some cases, packing the nasal cavity in the emergency room setting will stop the bleeding. If that is not enough, the broken blood vessel may need to be treated. This is sometimes done through cautery, a minor procedure in which the area thats bleeding is slightly burned to block the vessel from bleeding. Sometimes, an operative procedure that identifies and clips the problematic blood vessel may be necessary. In rare cases, embolization is recommended to stop the bleeding, in which a radiologist will perform an angiogram and inject particles into the blood vessels. If you experience recurrent episodes of brisk bleeding, you should be evaluated by an ear, nose, and throat specialist. There can be other underlying reasons for recurrent nosebleeds, such as vascular abnormalities or tumors. An endoscopic exam and CT or MRI scan may be needed to further evaluate the bleeding. If you or a loved one experiences recurrent nosebleeds, requ Continue reading >>

Health And Wellness Portal | Children's Hospital Vanderbilt | Diabetes And Other Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders | Nosebleed (epistaxis) In Children

Health And Wellness Portal | Children's Hospital Vanderbilt | Diabetes And Other Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders | Nosebleed (epistaxis) In Children

A nosebleed is bleeding from tissues inside the nose (nasal mucus membranes) caused by a broken blood vessel. The medical word for nosebleed is epistaxis. Most nosebleeds in children occur in the front part of the nose close to the nostrils. This part of the nose has many tiny blood vessels. These can be damaged easily. A nosebleed can look scary, but is usually not a serious problem. Nosebleeds are common in children. They happen more often in dry climates. They also happen more during the winter. Thats when dry heat in homes and buildings can cause drying, cracking, and crusting inside the nose. Many children outgrow nosebleeds during their teen years. Nosebleeds can be caused by many things. Some common causes include: In many cases, no specific cause for a nosebleed is found. Which children are at risk for a nosebleed? A child may be more at risk for nosebleed if he or she: What are the symptoms of a nosebleed in a child? The main symptom of a nosebleed is blood dripping or running from the nose. Bleeding from the mucus membranes in the front of the nose comes from only one nostril. Bleeding higher up in the nasal cavity may come from both nostrils. It may be painless. Or your child may have pain caused by an injury or an area of sore tissue inside the nose. The symptoms of a nosebleed can be like other health conditions. Make sure yourchild sees his or her healthcare provider for a diagnosis. The healthcare provider will ask about your childs symptoms and health history. He or she may also ask about any recent accidents or injuries. He or she will give your child a physical exam. Have your child sit up and lean forward slightly. Dont have your child lie down. This is to prevent him or her from swallowing blood. Swallowing blood may make your child vomit. Dont have Continue reading >>

Nosebleeds During Pregnancy: When You Should Be Concerned

Nosebleeds During Pregnancy: When You Should Be Concerned

Nosebleeds During Pregnancy: When You Should Be Concerned Nosebleeds during pregnancy are typically harmless. | Source Pregnancy can be a time of great joy. It can also be a time of great anxiety and worry. Your body is constantly changing and it is difficult to determine what is normal and what is cause for alarm. Epistaxis, the medical term for a nosebleed, is a common complaint during pregnancy. Approximately 20 percent of women will experience an occasional nosebleed during their pregnancy. Many of these occur during the first trimester. Many people experience this condition during pregnancy and, not surprisingly, they ask important questions. Frequently Asked Questions About Nosebleeds During Pregnancy When should you seek medical care for nosebleeds? Is epistaxis always related to pregnancy? Below you will find detailed answers to each of these questions. I have experienced this condition first hand and it can be quite scary, especially when it occurs in the first few weeks of a new pregnancy. After experiencing my first prenatal nosebleed, I performed research and visited several doctors to learn more about the topic. You may be happy to learn that it is rarely a cause for concern. Although epistaxis is generally a benign condition, there are instances when it is prudent to seek medical treatment. In rare cases, nosebleeds may be a symptom of an underlying condition. Pregnant women are at a greater risk for hypertension, diabetes, and stroke. Seek immediate medical treatment if a nosebleed accompanies any of these conditions or symptoms. Seek emergency care if persistent chest pain or labored breathing accompanies a nosebleed. It is not unusual for anxiety to induce some discomfort, but prolonged or severe pain should be investigated. Consult a physician after a Continue reading >>

What Causes Nosebleeds And How To Stop Them - Health

What Causes Nosebleeds And How To Stop Them - Health

Its estimated that one in seven Americans will have nasal bleeding, or epitaxis in medical lingo, at some point in their lifetime. Nosebleeds can occur at any age, but theyre more common in children ages 2 to 10 and in adults 50 to 80, says the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. There are two types of nosebleeds: posterior and anterior. Anterior nosebleeds involve tiny blood vessels in the front of the nose. Most anterior nosebleeds can be self-treated. Posterior nosebleeds involve bigger blood vessels deep in the nasal cavity and can be more problematic because bleeding can be profuse and difficult to stop. These nosebleeds almost always require medical intervention. Overall, anterior nosebleeds are much more common than posterior, says Shaunda Rodriguez, DO, an ear, nose, and throat/head and neck surgeon with Via Christi Health in Wichita, Kansas. Dont ever shove anything up your nose, Dr. Rodriguez cautions. No tissue, no gauze. You could make things worse, she says, by further irritating nasal blood vessels. During winters dry months, use an over-the-counter saline spray plus a humidifier at night to keep nasal membranes moist so they dont crack and bleed. Dr. Rodriguez does not recommend using petroleum jelly in the nose. In rare cases, it can travel to the lungs, causing inflammation. Instead, try over-the-counter saline gel or consult your doctor about a prescription for an antibiotic ointment, she says. Ear, nose, and throat specialists also recommend trimming childrens fingernails to avoid a picking-related nosebleed. Doctors also advise quitting smoking ; smoke dries out and irritates the nose. To get our top stories delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter When to contact a physician about a nosebleed If you h Continue reading >>

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

One of the best ways to prevent diabetes is to spot blood sugar (glucose) problems before the full-blown disease develops. But most people don’t realize that diabetes — and its precursor, prediabetes — can cause no symptoms at all or a wide range of symptoms that often are misinterpreted. Common mistake: Because diabetes is strongly linked to excess body weight, many people who are a normal weight assume that they won’t develop the disease. But that’s not always true. About 15% of people who are diagnosed with diabetes are not overweight. And paradoxically, even weight loss can be a symptom of this complex disorder in people (normal weight or overweight) who have uncontrolled high glucose levels. Shocking new finding: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimates that 40% of Americans ages 40 to 74 have prediabetes, and nearly two out of three Americans over age 65 have prediabetes or diabetes — most likely due to the increasing numbers of people who are overweight and inactive, both of which boost diabetes risk. However, most primary care doctors aren’t diagnosing and treating prediabetes early enough in their patients — often because they fail to order the necessary screening tests. And because the symptoms of prediabetes can be subtle, especially in its early stages, most people are not reporting potential red flags to their doctors. Fortunately, prediabetes can virtually always be prevented from progressing to diabetes if the condition is identified and treated in its early stages (by following a healthful diet, exercising regularly and taking nutritional supplements and medications, if necessary). Being overweight (defined as having a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 or higher) is perhaps the best-known risk factor for diabetes.* The mo Continue reading >>

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