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Diabetes No Appetite

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Appetite

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Appetite

Why Has My Appetite Changed? One of the odd things about diabetes is that it can cause people to lose their appetite, or conversely, can cause them to feel hungrier than usual. Both extremes are usually a warning sign of some possible issue to your health so it’s important (even if you have not been diagnosed with diabetes) to know about how your appetite can signify a potentially more serious health problem. Loss of Appetite Many people would be delighted to lose their appetite if that made it easier to lose some weight, but when appetite loss is linked to diabetes it can be dangerous. Gastrparesis One possible cause of loss of appetite is gastroparesis, a condition where food moves too slowly through the digestive tract. This happens when over time high blood glucose levels damage the vagus nerve — the nerve that supplies nerve fibers to the pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), trachea (windpipe), lungs, heart, esophagus, and intestinal tract. When this occurs, the muscles in the gut can no longer move food easily out of the stomach into the small intestine to continue the digestion process. This state is called gastroparesis. As well as loss of appetite, symptoms of gastroparesis include weight loss, heartburn, abdominal bloating, reflux, nausea and vomiting undigested food. Additional symptoms might present as high or low blood glucose levels and stomach spasms. The condition makes blood glucose levels more difficult to control. Ketoacidosis Another diabetes-related condition that can cause appetite loss is diabetic ketoacidosis — a complication that occurs when hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) goes untreated and high levels of ketones build up in the blood and urine. When your body does not produce enough insulin, the cells are unable to use glucose for fue Continue reading >>

Lack Of Appetite From Diabetic Cat

Lack Of Appetite From Diabetic Cat

My cat was recently diagnosed as diabetic two weeks ago. He was prescribed insulin 2x daily and we slowly changed his diet to the wet foods after researching online with Binky's comparison chart. Our vet was pushing the dry diabetic cat foods which I resisted after reading all the information online. The first week, he was doing very well and enjoying the wet cat food. Now, two weeks later, he has stopped eating his food and is not interested in chicken or turkey. The first day we called the vet and were told by the vet tech not to give his dosage while the vet told us to give the insulin... after almost two days of this, we brought him back to the vet who tested his blood sugar and we were told to hold off on insulin shots because his blood sugar had dropped. The vet has mentioned a pill or injection to stimulate his appetite. Can you please tell me what is recommended as I have doubts about what is actually best for my cat? When a diabetic cat stops eating for whatever reason, their glucose levels will still stay elevated because they are diabetic. The fact that your kitty's blood glucose got too low means either he got too much insulin and became hypoglycemic or he has lost his insulin requirements and is no longer diabetic (yes, this happens.) However, since he wasn't eating, I would guess that it was the former - his insulin dosage was too high and his glucose went too low and he didn't feel well. This can be an extremely dangerous situation, even leading to death. I think there's more at stake here than using an appetite stimulant. You need to know the underlying cause of his loss of appetite, which seems to be unstable glucose levels and that needs to be addressed. I can't recommend strongly enough purchasing your own glucometer and testing your cat's blood gluc Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Loss Of Appetite - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Anyone else feeling a loss of appetite? I'm 34 weeks and have been on a strict paleo diet due to GD and midwives orders and lately my body is just rejecting all the food I'm supposed to be eating. I've about had it with salads and sweet potatoes. And eggs. I'm so tired of all the same foods and not even being able to have milk or yogurt. It makes the days long and tiring and I would just rather not eat anything that have to gag down all the food I've been eating since 28 weeks. I don't really know if I'm asking a question or if I'm venting. I just needed to get it out. Blah I have been feeling the same this week! So sick of the same things and am just not hungry some days. I don' know if it is the baby squishing my stomach but I am having to force myself to eat my snacks and some meals. I am allowed Greek yogurt though and am not strictly paleo. Not alone!!! I cried all morning cause I feel weak and hungry and cannot stomach another egg!!! Last night I could not eat. We had grilled chicken salad AGAIN.... I feel defeated I'm so glad this isn't just me. Even though I know it sucks, having other women going through it makes it suck less for some reason. I know that loss of appetite is common near the end but I just want to eat what sounds good. Like French fries. Of all things. A bowl of cereal. I cannot for the life of me eat another darn egg. I can't even have toast! Agh. This is has been the longest 6 weeks ever and I still have another 6 before due date. I'm praying little mister comes early so I can have a milk shake and grilled cheese! I have had this myself. Last night I dropped half my bedtime snack on the floor and couldn't get myself to go get something else instead, I just wasn't hungry and so sick of the same old so I went to bed. My fasting number this morni Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite?! - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Loss Of Appetite?! - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. i've been going through this weird phase this past week; i've lost my appetite and eating food kind of turns me off. i'm sort of worried... i've lost 5 pounds in just a few days because i just can't seem to eat anything. should i go see a doctor, or should i wait another week or two? oh, and my numbers are extremely stable, i'm guessing it's because i don't eat anything and have an active basal. I have felt the same exact way all week. Only my sugar drops so I have to force feed myself to keep it normal. I've been sick to my stomach and I also have GERD so I'm thinking it's just that acting up but it's making me not want to eat anything either. It sucks. I dunno what meds you're on sometimes they make you lose your appetite. I wouldn't let it go for too long, wouldn't hurt to run it by your doc. I go too go through phases of feeling "green", but not for a prolonged period of time - like an entire week. Something is definitely not right there - would definitely get it checked at the Dr. Also, just a thought, is there any chance that you may be pregnant? I go too go through phases of feeling "green", but not for a prolonged period of time - like an entire week. Something is definitely not right there - would definitely get it checked at the Dr. Also, just a thought, is there any chance that you may be pregnant? no, no chance of being pregnant. and my hunger still hasn't returned; i force myself to eat at least one meal a day to try to get some fuel in my body. I've lost a few more pounds since i first put up this post... i'm starting to look like i did right before i was diagnosed with diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Medications Affect Your Appetite

How Diabetes Medications Affect Your Appetite

Many of my patients with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. For them, losing weight is an important way to gain better control over their diabetes and improve their health in general. But losing weight by diet and exercise alone can be very difficult. In fact, the latest science about obesity suggests the hormones controlling appetite in an obese body are dysregulated. To put it very simply, that means obese patients’ brains may tell them they’re hungry when they’re actually full. It shows us we may need pharmacological assistance to rebalance leptin, ghrelin, and other appetite hormones to get the body functioning correctly. On top of tracking your diet and blood sugar, regular exercise is a key part of managing your diabetes. And while any exercise is better than none, certain activities have specific benefits for people with diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. While researchers are still learning more about appetite hormones, many of my patients wonder about the effect of their diabetes medications on their appetite. While the more standard diabetes treatments don’t suppress appetite or cause weight loss, newer therapies have come to the market in recent years that do offer these benefits. However, they’re so new that they lack long-term data on safety. Until we get more information, I tend to stick with the standards for most of my patients. Still, there are niches these drugs can fill. The classic treatment prescribed for diabetes, insulin, has the potential to cause weight gain, and doesn’t suppress appetite–which can be a huge drawback to ins Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Gastroparesis

Type 2 Diabetes And Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis, also called delayed gastric emptying, is a disorder of the digestive tract that causes food to remain in the stomach for a period of time that is longer than average. This occurs because the nerves that move food through the digestive tract are damaged, so muscles don’t work properly. As a result, food sits in the stomach undigested. The most common cause of gastroparesis is diabetes. It can develop and progress over time, especially in those with uncontrolled blood sugar levels. The following are symptoms of gastroparesis: heartburn nausea vomiting of undigested food early fullness after a small meal weight loss bloating loss of appetite blood glucose levels that are hard to stabilize stomach spasms acid reflux Gastroparesis symptoms may be minor or severe, depending on the damage to the vagus nerve, a long cranial nerve that extends from the brain stem to the abdominal organs, including those of the digestive tract. Symptoms can flare up any time, but are more common after the consumption of high-fiber or high-fat foods, all of which are slow to digest. Women with diabetes have a high risk for developing gastroparesis. Other conditions can compound your risk of developing the disorder, including previous abdominal surgeries or a history of eating disorders. Diseases and conditions other than diabetes can cause gastroparesis, such as: viral infections acid reflux disease smooth muscle disorders Other illnesses can cause gastroparesis symptoms, including: Parkinson’s disease chronic pancreatitis cystic fibrosis kidney disease Turner’s syndrome Sometimes no known cause can be found, even after extensive testing. People who have gastroparesis have damage to their vagus nerve. This impairs nerve function and digestion because the impulses needed to chu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

The most common type of diabetes in children is type 1 diabetes. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in the U.S. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes may also be known by a variety of other names, including: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) Juvenile diabetes Brittle diabetes Sugar diabetes There are two forms of type 1 diabetes: Idiopathic type 1. This refers to rare forms of the disease with no known cause. Immune-mediated diabetes. An autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Immune-mediated diabetes is the most common form of type 1 diabetes and is generally referred to as type 1 diabetes. What causes type 1 diabetes? The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. However, it is believed that people inherit a tendency to develop diabetes, and that some outside trigger may be involved. Type 1 diabetes is the result of the body's failure to produce insulin, the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to provide fuel. This is the result of an autoimmune process in which the body's immune system attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood, depriving the cells of nutrition. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections and regularly monitor their blood sugar levels. What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. In children, type 1 diabetes symptoms may resemble flu symptoms. The following are the most common symptoms for type 1 diabetes. However, each ch Continue reading >>

Why People With Diabetes Lose Appetite?

Why People With Diabetes Lose Appetite?

Pancreas is an organ of the body. Insulin is a hormone secreted by your pancreas to stimulate the glucose in the blood to get absorbed by the body’s cells. But diabetes makes the body immune to insulin. Thus, the body’s cells are no longer capable of using the glucose to produce energy. While the glucose remains in the blood- increasing blood sugar levels- the body begins to break down body fat to release energy. This process releases ketones, which are chemicals released when fat is broken down to produce energy. The ketones collect in the blood and this makes the blood more acidic. As a result, you may experience the following symptoms: Thirst or a very dry mouth Frequent urination Fatigue Dry or flushed skin Nausea or vomiting Abdominal pain Breathing difficulties Inability to concentrate Therefore, it is clear that ketone poisoning can make you very sick. When you are sick you often don’t feel like eating anything. This is considered a serious condition as it is a sign that your diabetes is out of control and you should contact your doctor. To keep things in check always monitor your blood sugar levels. Get your blood and urine checked for ketone levels. Low appetite can mean that you’re running the risk of weight-loss. Thus, it’s important to increase your calorie intake. You can help your appetite by: Taking a detox program Eating a little more than you normally do Watching what and how much you drink Doing short periods of structured exercises You can also talk to your doctor about it. Your doctor might be able to recommend something to help increase your appetite. Always talk to a nutritionist before making any changes in your eating habits. Source: Continue reading >>

Fatigue And Loss Of Appetite

Fatigue And Loss Of Appetite

Fatigue is a constant state of tiredness, even when youve gotten your usual amount of sleep. This symptom develops over time and causes a drop in your physical, emotional, and psychological energy levels. Youre also more likely to feel unmotivated to participate in or do activities you normally enjoy. Some other signs of fatigue include feeling: as though you have less stamina or endurance than normal Loss of appetite means you dont have the same desire to eat as you used to. Signs of decreased appetite include not wanting to eat, unintentional weight loss, and not feeling hungry. The idea of eating food may make you feel nauseous, as if you might vomit after eating. Long-term loss of appetite is also known as anorexia, which can have a medical or psychological cause. It may be a warning sign from your body when you feel fatigue and loss of appetite together. Read on to see what conditions may cause these symptoms. What causes fatigue and loss of appetite? Fatigue and loss of appetite are symptoms of several health conditions. The condition can be as common as the flu or a sign of something more serious like cancer. Often a loss of appetite can cause fatigue, especially if you arent getting enough calories or nutrients. Chronic, or long-term, pain can also interfere with your appetite and cause fatigue. Some conditions that can cause continuous pain include: You also should make an appointment to see your doctor if youre experiencing these symptoms after taking a new medication, even after youve taken it for several days. Seek emergency attention if you or someone you know has thoughts of harming themselves. How will your doctor diagnose fatigue and loss of appetite? While there isnt a specific test for fatigue and loss of appetite, your doctor will review your medical Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis

What is gastroparesis? Gastroparesis, also called delayed gastric emptying, is a disorder that slows or stops the movement of food from the stomach to the small intestine. Normally, the muscles of the stomach, which are controlled by the vagus nerve, contract to break up food and move it through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. The movement of muscles in the GI tract, along with the release of hormones and enzymes, allows for the digestion of food. Gastroparesis can occur when the vagus nerve is damaged by illness or injury and the stomach muscles stop working normally. Food then moves slowly from the stomach to the small intestine or stops moving altogether. What causes gastroparesis? Most people diagnosed with gastroparesis have idiopathic gastroparesis, which means a health care provider cannot identify the cause, even with medical tests. Diabetes is the most common known cause of gastroparesis. People with diabetes have high levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the vagus nerve. Other identifiable causes of gastroparesis include intestinal surgery and nervous system diseases such as Parkinson’s disease or multiple sclerosis. For reasons that are still unclear, gastroparesis is more commonly found in women than in men. What are the symptoms of gastroparesis? The most common symptoms of gastroparesis are nausea, a feeling of fullness after eating only a small amount of food, and vomiting undigested food—sometimes several hours after a meal. Other symptoms of gastroparesis include gastroesophageal reflux (GER), also called acid reflux or acid regurgitation—a condition in which stomach contents flow back Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite Dangerous For Diabetics

Loss Of Appetite Dangerous For Diabetics

Q: Dear Donovan, I enjoy your column and see where you give advice to people who want to lose weight, and some of the advice is given to people with lifestyle diseases such as diabetes. However, my issue is a bit different. What if you're a diabetic who is losing too much weight and whose appetite is waning? How can this be treated? A: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease which interferes with the body's ability to control the blood glucose level. Diabetes can cause a number of symptoms including a loss of appetite, which can last for a few days. In your specific situation I wish you had given me more information. For example, are you currently on medication for diabetes? How did your loss of appetite occur: gradually or sudden? What do you eat on a daily basis? Also, are you exercising? Furthermore, are you having any stomach pain, vomiting or feeling nauseous? Overall, it is very important to find out the underlying cause of your lack of appetite. I would strongly suggest that you consult with your doctor. Until your appetite returns to normal you are at great risk of malnutrition and other health problems. In diabetes mellitus, the body does not produce enough insulin or functional insulin. The cells are therefore unable to properly use glucose to produce energy. As a result, the body will break down fat for energy. This further results in the production of ketones, which can make the body acidic as well as reduce the appetite. However, it should be noted that some diabetics do experience an increase in appetite. Therefore, it is very important that you consult with your doctor. In a nutshell, if your appetite is low, this can lead to weight loss. Hence, in order for you to regain your weight you will have to get the appetite back up and increase your intake of cal Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Loss Of Appetite

Diabetes: Loss Of Appetite

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that interferes with the body’s ability to control the level of glucose in the blood. No matter what type of diabetes you have, symptoms develop as a result of high blood glucose levels, according to MayoClinic.com. Complications can cause a loss of appetite that lasts for more than a couple of days. Video of the Day When trying to determine the cause for your loss of appetite, your health care provider may ask whether you feel nauseous, have stomach pain or vomiting or are currently taking any medications. Your doctor may also ask if your loss of appetite came on gradually or suddenly and if you've recently lost weight. Mention how long it has been since you first noticed changes in your appetite. Tell your doctor if there is a family history of diabetes. Until your appetite returns to normal, you are at risk for malnutrition and other health problems; therefore, you need to find out the underlying cause for your decrease in appetite. Complications can occur when diabetes goes undiagnosed for an extended length of time. Suffering a loss of appetite for a few weeks or more can lead to malnutrition, a condition where your body does not get the nutrients it needs. Aside from possible malnutrition, if left untreated, diabetes can damage the eyes, kidneys and nerves. Undiagnosed diabetes can also cause circulation problems, heart attack and stroke. Although there is no cure for the disease, you can prevent complications from occurring by maintaining a healthy weight and controlling blood glucose levels. Monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol levels, eating a balanced diet, being physically active and seeing your doctor regularly are additional steps you can take to help manage your diabetes. If hyperglycemia goes untreated, diabet Continue reading >>

Glucophage (metformin) And Loss Of Appetite

Glucophage (metformin) And Loss Of Appetite

Glucophage (metformin) and loss of appetite Glucophage (metformin) and loss of appetite Hello everyone! I'm new here, my name is Penny and I was diagnosed as insulin resistant and pre-diabetic almost 10 years ago. As a kid suddenly I started getting fatter and fatter and my mom decided to get me to an endocrinologist, who said that I had some hormonal problems and that my brain had a switch that was constantly on and did not register if I was full or not, so I constantly ate plates of food in one sitting. That changed dramatically after he balanced out my hormones (injecting Daronda over the course of the years) and later he prescribed me Glucophage. Then I started feeling full, had no appetite and lost A LOT of weight (I was on 1700 per day). 2 years later, I still did not have my appetite back, and I did not feel hungry even if I hadn't eaten in many hours, that resulted to me being underweight. So my mom just decided to make me ditch the pill in order for me to gain some kilos back. After a week of stopping it, then I started not feeling full, constantly wanting to eat even if I had just eaten! Oh and the worst, the cravings. I craved everything. Carbs, sweets everything bad. Then I also got depression and until a year ago I reached 72 kilos. Mind you, I am 165m so that was when I revisited my endo and he prescribed me again the metformin. (He, of course, told me to follow a certain lifestyle with it, no sugar, limit my carbs etc.) It was a little after a month of starting it that I felt like my old self. I had no appetite, no cravings, and no hunger. Fast forward to today. After a year I managed to lose weight and now I'm 54 kilos. My endo reduced my pill intake to just 850 per day because I am and he is afraid that I can become underweight again (now I have a norm Continue reading >>

Should I Eat If I'm Not Hungry?

Should I Eat If I'm Not Hungry?

I have been a diabetic for over 40 years and have been on the insulin pump. I am not hungry for the most part all day long, and sometimes a week at a time. My A1C is 6.1 and my endocrinologist is very happy with my blood sugars. Should I force myself to eat, whether I am hungry or not? I do not feel weak or anything like that — I'm just not hungry. — Margo, New Hampshire The short answer is yes. You must try to eat for two reasons: to prevent hypoglycemia, and more importantly, to prevent malnutrition. Even though you do not feel weak, your body requires nutrients continuously for its vital functions. I recommend eating small portions frequently and choosing nutrient-dense foods to ensure that you have adequate intake. Work with your doctor or a nutritionist to calculate your caloric needs. I also suggest that, with your doctor’s help, you find the cause of your loss of appetite. Since you say you have had diabetes for 40 years, you might be experiencing gastrointestinal neuropathy, a type of neuropathy that affects the gut and can cause you to feel full. There are several other possible reasons for loss of appetite that should be explored with your doctor. If you have not been sleeping well, have felt down, and have difficulty concentrating, the loss of your appetite might be due to depression. Bring this to your doctor’s attention, as depression is treatable. She will also work with you to investigate other reasons for your loss of appetite. One final note: In those who have had diabetes for a long time, or have had repeated episodes of low blood sugar, the warning signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia can be blunted. In other words, you may not feel its symptoms until your blood sugar dips to a dangerously low level. You should be vigilant about checking your su Continue reading >>

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