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Diabetes Night Sweating

Can Diabetes Trigger Night Sweat Episodes?

Can Diabetes Trigger Night Sweat Episodes?

Diabetes is a lifelong condition, characterized by a person having blood sugar levels that are higher than normal. There are two strands of the condition - type 1 and type 2 - and in both types, night sweat episodes may symptomize abnormally low blood glucose levels. These should always be dealt with immediately, because potential consequences range from disorientation to loss of consciousness, or even death. Read on to learn more about diabetes, how diabetes can be a night sweats trigger, and how to efficiently restore low blood sugar levels. What Is Diabetes? The pancreas gland behind the stomach produces insulin, a hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood and enables the conversion of glucose into energy for the healthy functioning of the body. Diabetics produce insufficient amounts of insulin or insulin that doesn't function properly, which means they are unable to convert glucose into energy naturally. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood and is controlled by regular insulin injections to replace that which the body cannot produce; type 2 is more commonly associated with adults and obesity, and is managed with a healthy diet and tablets. Part of managing diabetes responsibly means being aware of the symptoms that indicate a change in blood sugar levels in the body. Hypoglycemia For a diabetic, night sweat episodes could be indicative of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is defined as a severe lack of energy caused by abnormally low blood sugar, when glucose levels drop to between three to four millimoles per liter (mmol). Hypoglycemia can occur when a diabetic has taken too much insulin, skipped a meal, or exercised too hard without replenishing lost energy levels. During the day, feeling hungry, dizzy, and shaky are all fairly noticeable symptom Continue reading >>

What Night Sweats Are

What Night Sweats Are

Most people sweat during the night. If you regularly wake up with soaking wet sheets you should get it checked by a GP. It's normal to sweat during the night if the room or your bedding is making you too hot. Night sweats are when you sweat so much that your night clothes and bedding are soaking wet, even though where you're sleeping is cool. Adults and children can get night sweats. See a GP if you: have night sweats regularly that wake you up or you're worried also have a very high temperature (or feel hot and shivery), a cough or diarrhoea have night sweats and you're losing weight for no reason Treatment from your GP Often you won't need treatment, but your GP will want to check if you have any other symptoms. If your GP thinks your medicine might be causing night sweats you could be prescribed a different one. Causes of night sweats The most common reasons for night sweats are: menopause symptoms ("hot flushes") anxiety medicines – some antidepressants, steroids and painkillers low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) alcohol or drug use a harmless condition called hyperhidrosis that makes you sweat too much all the time Sometimes the cause of night sweats is unknown. Next review due: 12/12/2020 Call 111 If you can’t speak to your GP or don’t know what to do next. Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

Do you ever wake up drenched in sweat in the middle of the night—even if the thermostat is turned low? Try these diabetes-friendly ways to prevent night sweats. If you’ve ever awakened a few hours after drifting off to sleep, wrapped in damp sheets and dripping with sweat, you know how disruptive it can be to a good night’s rest. Why might your body’s own thermostat be going haywire? “Night sweats are usually related to hypoglycemia, an episode of low blood sugar,” says L.A.-based diabetes educator Lori Zanini, RD. “Other signs of nighttime hypoglycemia include waking up with a headache and having nightmares,” both caused by fitful sleep. A variety of circumstances can throw your blood sugar off balance, from injecting the incorrect amount of insulin to eating or exercising differently than usual. “Focus on preventing your nighttime lows, rather than reacting to the symptoms caused by the lows,” says Zanini. Here’s how: Eat a bedtime snack. “A protein-rich snack is absorbed and processed by the liver slowly enough to ensure blood sugar remains stable throughout the night,” says Zanini. Opt for one that contains at least 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and one to two ounces of protein. Some ideas include: ¾ cup of blueberries and ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese Slice of whole-wheat, high-fiber toast with 1 to 2 tablespoons natural peanut butter One or two servings of string cheese Ask yourself: Have I been more active today? If the answer is “yes,” be sure to adjust for the extra physical activity by snacking or taking less blood sugar-lowering medication to compensate for burning extra sugar. Avoid late-night drinking. Consuming alcohol in the evening can put you at risk for low blood sugar, since your liver is busy clearing the alcohol from Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

How To Stop Sweating In Your Sleep

How To Stop Sweating In Your Sleep

Expert Reviewed Three Methods:Identifying the Cause of Your Night SweatsChanging Your Diet to Avoid Night SweatsSeeking Medical Treatment for Night SweatsCommunity Q&A Sweating in your sleep may be caused by a hot room, too much bedding, or an underlying health issue, such as sleep disorders, anxiety, diabetes, cancer, and other medical conditions, including menopause. If you experience more than occasional nighttime sweats, you may have night sweats, also known as hyperhidrosis. In rare cases, no underlying medical condition can be identified for night sweats. To stop sweating in your sleep, you should identify the cause of your night sweats. You should look for appropriate medical treatment and make appropriate changes to your diet. Continue reading >>

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

Doctors often hear their patients complain of night sweats. Night sweats refer to excess sweating during the night. But if your bedroom is unusually hot or you are wearing too many bedclothes, you may sweat during sleep, and this is normal. True night sweats are severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench your clothes and sheets and that are not related to an overheated environment. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or body) may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats. There are many different causes of night sweats. To find the cause, a doctor must get a detailed medical history and order tests to decide if another medical condition is responsible for the night sweats. Some of the known conditions that can cause night sweats are: Menopause. The hot flashes that accompany menopause can occur at night and cause sweating. This is a very common cause of night sweats in women. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the body chronically produces too much sweat without any identifiable medical cause. Infections. Tuberculosis is the infection most commonly associated with night sweats. But bacterial infections, such as endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves), osteomyelitis (inflammation in the bones), and abscesses can cause night sweats. Night sweats are also a symptom of HIV infection. Cancers. Night sweats are an early symptom of some cancers. The most common type of cancer associated with night sweats is lymphoma. However, people who have an undiagnosed cancer frequently have other symptoms as well, such as unexplained weight loss and fevers. Medications . Taking certain medications can lead to night sweats. Antidepressant medications are a common type of drug that can lead to Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Why Do I Sweat So Much At Night? 7 Unexpected Explanations

Why Do I Sweat So Much At Night? 7 Unexpected Explanations

Some medications iStock/Roel Smart Certain medications give a rise to night sweats and may leave you tossing and turning throughout your sleep. Antidepressants are the most common drug associated with night sweats, with anywhere from 8 to 22 percent of patients who use them reporting overheating at night. Night sweats are often seen with other psychiatric drugs, but even over-the-counter anti-fever medications like acetaminophen and ibuprofen can cause your body to heat up in bed, too. Here are 9 other things your sweat reveals about your health. Low blood sugar iStock/BartekSzewczyk For people with type 1 diabetes, waking up throughout the night in fits of heat may be your body's way of alerting you to low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia. Night sweats, along with other symptoms of low blood sugar, like headaches and nightmares, may occur if you don’t inject the correct amount of insulin right before you hit the sheets, according to the online resource Diabetes Self Management. Fortunately, these bouts of sweat are treatable, as taking preventative measures like eating a late night snack can help even out your insulin levels. Here are easy-to-miss signs that you have diabetes. From Merrill Lynch A long-term infection iStock/monkeybusinessimages If your night sweats begin to occur more regularly and more severely, it may be the sign of a more serious issue. For example, night sweats are one of the primary symptoms of tuberculosis, a potentially dangerous infectious disease that affects the lungs. They also can be a sign of bacterial infections like endocarditis (heart valve inflammation) and osteomyelitis (bone inflammation), as well as an early marker of HIV. iStock/CaseyHillPhoto Chronic night sweats are often one of the first visible signs of a lymphoma diag Continue reading >>

Night Sweats And Women's Health

Night Sweats And Women's Health

Night sweats are drenching sweats that soak clothes and bedding and disturb sleep. Night sweats occur when blood vessels expand, causing increased blood flow, and then contract. This causes a sudden wave of heat that spreads throughout the body, followed by sweating, reddening of the skin, and rapid heartbeat. Often, the night sweat is followed by a cold chill. References: National Cancer Institute. Hot Flashes and Night Sweats. Patient Version Accessed 6/1/2017. North American Menopause Society. Menopause 101: A Primer for the Perimenopausal Accessed 6/1/2017. Viera AJ, Bond MM, Yates SW. Diagnosing Night Sweats. American Academy of Family Physicians. Am Fam Physician 2003;67:1019-24. © Copyright 1995-2017 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. All rights reserved. This information is provided by the Cleveland Clinic and is not intended to replace the medical advice of your doctor or healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider for advice about a specific medical condition. This document was last reviewed on: 06/29/2017 Continue reading >>

Night Sweats And Diabetes

Night Sweats And Diabetes

One of the possible causes night sweats is diabetes. Night sweats and diabetes can affect men, women or children; it’s not discriminant. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it’s likely that you have suffered from night sweats on at least one occasion, possibly accompanied by other disturbing sensations like weakness, heart palpitations, dizziness, hunger or anxiety. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, may be causing these symptoms. Nighttime hypoglycemia and night sweats go hand and hand but there are a few things you can do to stabilize your blood sugar while you sleep and in turn help reduce your chances of experiencing that uncomfortable sweating at night that can be caused by changes in blood sugar levels. The Link Between Night Sweats and Diabetes There are a number of reasons why a person with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes might experience low blood sugar at night that leads to sweating while sleeping. When we sleep, our bodies require less fuel so the liver produces less sugar. In people without diabetes, the pancreas responds by producing less insulin and everything stays in balance. For individuals with diabetes, the pancreas either doesn’t produce enough insulin or produces no insulin at all, requiring individuals to inject insulin to control blood sugar levels. However, injecting too much insulin or changing the quantities or timing of meals can throw off blood sugar levels. When blood sugar drops to the mid 60’s, the nervous system reacts in a number of ways. One of those reactions is sweating, either as traditional night sweats or cold sweats at night. Sweating can also be accompanied by trembling, hunger, weakness or fatigue and a sense of nervousness or anxiety. These symptoms are important to note as it is your body’s way of signaling you t Continue reading >>

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

DEAR DR. ROACH: As a preventive measure for prediabetes, my doctor recommended I take 500 mg of metformin twice a day (morning and evening). I have been following this regimen for two months. The same day I started the medication, my night sweats started up again, with a vengeance. On the metformin, my quality of sleep was negatively affected by four to five episodes of bad hot flashes every night. Since hot flashes/night sweats were not mentioned as a side effect either by my doctor or on the information pamphlet, I notified my doctor. He suggested stopping the metformin for two to four weeks to see if the night sweats subsided. I had IMMEDIATE relief with the night sweats being eliminated the first day I stopped the medication. I am a 58-year-old female, and other than needing to lose about 20 pounds, am in good health, exercise every day and eat a healthy diet. Some research indicates that metformin causes hypoglycemia, which then causes the night sweats. A sometimes-mentioned desirable side effect is weight loss. What is your take on metformin and whether it is a help or a hindrance to good health? -- R.M.T. ANSWER: Metformin was tested in a large trial to see whether it could help prevent people at high risk for diabetes from developing overt diabetes, and it was successful at doing so. It wasn't quite as successful as a good diet and regular exercise, but many experts do use metformin, especially in overweight people, to help them lose weight and reduce their diabetes risk. In my opinion, it works best when combined with a healthy diet and regular exercise. However, it does have side effects. Gastrointestinal side effects, especially diarrhea but also nausea, are the most common. Hot flashes are listed as occurring in up to 10 percent of people taking the medicati Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Night Sweats

Diagnosing Night Sweats

Evaluation An extensive list of diagnostic considerations in patients with night sweats is provided in Table 1.2–9 The history and physical examination are aimed at revealing associated symptoms that will narrow this broad differential diagnosis and guide additional studies. Table 2 lists diagnostic actions to be considered based on findings from the history and physical. TABLE 1 Malignancy Lymphoma Leukemia Other neoplasm Infections Human immunodeficiency virus Tuberculosis Mycobacterium avium complex Infectious mononucleosis Fungal infections (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis) Lung abscess2 Endocarditis Other infection Endocrine Ovarian failure Hyperthyroidism Diabetes mellitus (nocturnal hypoglycemia) Endocrine tumors (pheochromocytoma, carcinoid tumor) Orchiectomy3 Rheumatologic Takayasu's arteritis Temporal arteritis4 Other Obstructive sleep apnea Gastroesophageal reflux disease Chronic fatigue syndrome Granulomatous disease5 Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia Lymph node hyperplasia6 Diabetes insipidus8 Prinzmetal's angina9 Anxiety Pregnancy9 Drugs (Table 3) Antipyretics (salicylates, acetaminophen) Antihypertensives Phenothiazines Substances of abuse: alcohol, heroin Over-bundling Autonomic over-activity Associated symptoms or signs Action to consider Fever, TB exposure, HIV status or risk factors, cough, weight loss, immunocompromise Purified protein derivative, chest radiograph, CBC, HIV test (CD4+ if known HIV positive), possibly blood cultures Menopausal Hormone replacement therapy (an elevated FSH test if uncertain based on history, helps confirm the diagnosis) Firm lymphadenopathy in absence of current or recent infection Lymph node biopsy Recent upper respiratory tract infection CBC; heterophile antibodies or anti-VCA evaluation Diabetic Rule out nocturnal Continue reading >>

Case Study: A 90-year-old Man With Confusion And Night Sweats

Case Study: A 90-year-old Man With Confusion And Night Sweats

C.G. is a 90-year-old man with metastatic prostate cancer who was brought to the emergency room (ER) at midnight after being found confused and sweaty. In the ER, his blood glucose level was 44 mg/dl. He received one ampule of D50 and was started on intravenous D5NS. His confusion improved. On transfer to the medical floor, his blood glucose level was 161 mg/dl. He denied nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, and weight loss. His last meal had been at 6:00 p.m. He recalled another episode of confusion 3 weeks ago in the middle of the night that was milder and did not require hospitalization. His medical records revealed that his blood glucose levels had been elevated in 1996 (136–144 mg/dl) and that 1 month before admission, his blood glucose level was 50 mg/dl. His medical history was remarkable for prostate cancer on leuprolide (Lupron) injection, colon cancer (status post hemi-colectomy) with recent negative colonoscopy, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura requiring splenectomy, and vitamin B12 deficiency. He did not smoke or drink alcohol and he had no allergies. He took leuprolide via intramuscular injection every 3 months; vitamin B12, 1,000 mg via intramuscular injection monthly; and aspirin, 325 mg per day orally. There was no personal or family history of diabetes, occupation in an allied health profession, or past insulin treatment. Physical examination showed a well-nourished man in no acute distress. He was alert and awake. His blood pressure was 120/80 mmHg, heart rate was 66 and regular, and temperature was 99.8°F. He was 68 inches tall and weighed 158 lb. His body mass index was 23.9 kg/m2. Head, eyes, nose, and throat were normal. Lungs were clear, and cardiac exam was normal. Abdomen Continue reading >>

Don't Lose Sleep Over Night Sweats

Don't Lose Sleep Over Night Sweats

If you are one of the many people who suffer from night sweats, classified as excessive sweating at night, then you may be wondering about the potential causes and if you should be concerned. “True night sweats are defined as severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench sleepwear and sheets,” explains Laura M. Rosch, DO, an osteopathic internal medicine specialist from Wheaton, Illinois. Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine​, or DOs, focus on prevention by examining how your lifestyle and environment impact your health, rather than just treating your symptoms. Practical reasons for why someone may be experiencing night sweats include: Spicy foods or hot drinks before bedtime Hot weather or an over-heated bedroom Excessive amounts of blankets or bedclothes Exercising before bedtime If your night sweats occur on a regular basis, interrupt your sleep, or are accompanied by a fever or other symptoms, such as unexplained weight loss, then you should schedule an appointment with your physician. “Your doctor will take a look at your detailed medical history and may order tests, such as blood counts and virus and thyroid tests, to determine if you have any underlying medical conditions that could be responsible for the night sweats,” explains Dr. Rosch. According to Dr. Rosch, the following medical conditions are common causes of night sweats. Menopause—Known as “hot flashes” during the day, night sweats are very common for women going through menopause and are often the first sign. Infections—Bacterial infections like endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves) and osteomyelitis (inflammation within the bones) may result in night sweats, with tuberculosis being the most common infection associated with the condition. Chronic sweating—Idiopathic hype Continue reading >>

Night Sweats (causes, Remedies, And Treatments In Women And Men)

Night Sweats (causes, Remedies, And Treatments In Women And Men)

Doctors in primary care fields of medicine often hear their patients complain of night sweats as they are common. Night sweats refer to any excess sweating occurring during the night. However, if if you keep your bedroom temperature unusually hot or you are sleeping in too many clothes, you may sweat during your sleep, which is normal. In order to distinguish night sweats that arise from medical causes from those that occur because one's surroundings are too warm, doctors generally refer to true night sweats as severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench sleepwear and sheets, which are not related to an overheated environment. In one study of 2267 patients visiting a primary care doctor, 41% reported experiencing night sweats during the previous month, so the perception of excessive sweating at night is fairly common. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or trunk) also may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats. 10 Ways to Deal With Menopause Symptoms Menopause Symptoms: Emotional, Physical, and Sexual Menopause symptoms can be perceived as physical problems, emotional disturbances, or problems associated with sexual functioning. Some of the variety of symptoms of menopause may include: Painful intercourse Hot flashes Insomnia Mood changes Anxiety Forgetfulness or problems with concentration What other signs and symptoms accompany night sweats? Depending upon the underlying cause of the night sweats, other symptoms may occur in association with the sweating. For example: Certain infections and cancers Shaking and chills can sometimes occur if you have a fever. Night sweats due to the menopausal transition are typically accompanied by other symptoms of menopause such as vaginal dryness, daytime hot flashes, and mood cha Continue reading >>

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