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Diabetes Nhs

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms The symptoms of diabetes include feeling very thirsty, passing more urine than usual, and feeling tired all the time. The symptoms occur because some or all of the glucose stays in your blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to get rid of the excess glucose in your urine. The main symptoms, which are common to both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, are: urinating more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired unexplained weight loss cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision – caused by the lens of the eye becoming dry The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes are usually obvious and develop very quickly, often over a few weeks. These signs and symptoms aren't always as obvious, however, and it's often diagnosed during a routine check-up. This is because they are often mild and develop gradually over a number of years. This means you may have type 2 diabetes for many years without realising it. See your GP as soon as possible if you think you may have diabetes. Early diagnosis and treatment for type 2 diabetes is very important as it may reduce your risk of developing complications later on. Hyperglycaemia Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, can't produce enough insulin to control your blood glucose level, or when the cells in your body don't respond properly to the insulin that is produced. This means your blood glucose levels may become very high, and is known as hyperglycaemia. Hyperglycaemia can occur for several reasons, including: eating too much being unwell ineffective diabetes medication, or not taking enough Hyperglycaemia causes the main symptoms of diabetes, which include extreme thirst and frequent urination. Next review due: 27/06/2018 Type 2 diabetes occurs when t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nhs Costs Could Hit £17 Billion

Diabetes Nhs Costs Could Hit £17 Billion

The future of the NHS is at risk because the cost of treating diabetes could hit £17 billion by 2035, health experts have warned. According to Public Health England there are currently 4.5 million people in the UK who have diabetes, mainly type 2, but that could rise to 5 million if obesity is not tackled. The current cost of treating diabetes is £10 billion a year which is nearly 10 per cent of the health service’s entire budget. The national clinical director for obesity and diabetes at NHS England Professor Jonathan Valabhji said: “We need to stem the tide otherwise we could see [a] crisis and there are issues of sustainability for the NHS if we do nothing differently.” The issue was the subject of a special BBC One documentary called Inside Out, which was broadcast on Monday, October 24. The programme said there could be an extra 263,000 people with type 2 diabetes by 2035 if the obesity crisis continues. Prevention programmes Speaking to the BBC as part of the programme, chief executive of Diabetes UK Chris Askew said: “”As things stand we are certainly looking at a crisis in diabetes which threatens to bankrupt the NHS if we continue with these current trends. “I believe we’re facing a crisis and we really need concerted action right across society for us to fund more research, provide best possible care and crucially prevent so many cases of type 2 – in future.” Nick Hex, who is the economist who calculated the NHS treatment figures for the York Health Economics Consortium, said: “There is a fixed amount of money for the NHS so clearly if one disease area like diabetes is taking up more, a considerable amount of that cost, then there is less money to spend on cancer. “So it’s really important policymakers think about ways costs can be mi Continue reading >>

Nhs Spending On Diabetes 'to Reach £16.9 Billion By 2035'

Nhs Spending On Diabetes 'to Reach £16.9 Billion By 2035'

A new report published in the journal Diabetic Medicine has projected that the NHS’s annual spending on diabetes in the UK will increase from £9.8 billion to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years, a rise that means the NHS would be spending 17% of its entire budget on the condition. The Impact Diabetes report also suggests that the cost of treating diabetes complications is expected to almost double from the current total of £7.7 billion to £13.5 billion by 2035/6. Preventable complications Authored by the York Health Economic Consortium and developed in partnership between Diabetes UK, JDRF and Sanofi Diabetes, the report highlights the large percentage (79%) of NHS diabetes spending that goes on complications – many of which are preventable. Investing in the checks and services that help people manage the condition and thereby reduce the risk of complications could actually be less expensive than the current approach. The report quantifies the current costs of direct patient care for diabetes (which includes treatment, intervention and complications) and indirect costs of diabetes, such as those related to increased death and illness, work loss and the need for informal care, and also predicts the UK’s future costs of diabetes. According to the report, the total cost associated with diabetes in the UK currently stands at £23.7 billion and is predicted to rise to £39.8 billion by 2035/6. "Unfolding public health disaster" Barbara Young, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said, "This report shows that without urgent action, the already huge sums of money being spent on treating diabetes will rise to unsustainable levels that threaten to bankrupt the NHS. But the most shocking part of this report is the finding that almost four fifths of NHS diabetes spending goe Continue reading >>

Nhs Starts Diabetes 'stem Cell Factory'

Nhs Starts Diabetes 'stem Cell Factory'

The NHS is setting up a stem cell factory in Liverpool to treat people with diabetes. NHS Blood and Transplant wants to make and give the experimental therapy to patients at high risk of developing diabetes-related kidney problems. It is hoped the injections will slow down or stop tissue damage, removing the need for dialysis or transplants. Diabetes is the most common cause of end stage kidney disease, which kills around 40,000 people a year in the UK. The 48 patients taking part in the study will be treated at University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust and Belfast Health and Social Care Trust or at another trial site in Italy. The injection of cells they will receive are called stromal cells and they are grown from donated human bone marrow. These immature cells can grow and change into a variety of tissue - bone, cartilage and fat. But it is their ability to release proteins that reduce inflammation in the kidney which interests the researchers. In animal studies, stromal cell injections have provided measurable improvements in kidney function and it is hoped they will do the same in people. Only some of the patients in the study will get the real jab (at different doses). The others will get a dummy injection. This will let the investigators check whether the treatment really works and if it has any side effects. Project leader Prof Timothy O'Brien, from the National University of Ireland, Galway, said: "Diabetic kidney disease is very common so any therapy that could slow the progression of this disease would have a significant impact." About three in four people with diabetes will develop kidney disease. It is caused by damage to the small blood vessels that supply the kidneys. But it can be prevented or delayed by keeping blood sugar and blood pressure Continue reading >>

The Healthier You: Nhs Diabetes Prevention Programme Is An Appropriate Strategy

The Healthier You: Nhs Diabetes Prevention Programme Is An Appropriate Strategy

The paper by Barry and colleagues raises questions as to whether the Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme is an appropriate strategic approach to the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes. They report results of two meta-analyses: assessing diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for what they refer to as pre-diabetes; and assessing efficacy of interventions in preventing onset of Type 2 diabetes in people at high risk.[1] In the first meta-analysis, they use the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as gold standard for defining pre-diabetes. They suggest that, compared to this gold standard, HbA1c is neither sensitive nor specific for detecting pre-diabetes, and that fasting glucose is specific but not sensitive. They point out that HbA1c and fasting glucose are the tests used most commonly in England to assess for undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes, and the tests used for referral into the Healthier You Programme. Historically, the major randomised controlled trials that demonstrated the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions to prevent or delay onset of Type 2 diabetes in those at risk, defined high risk using OGTT,[2-6] which we assume was the authors’ justification for using OGTT as gold standard. The OGTT however is cumbersome and expensive, and is rarely used now in clinical practice aside in pregnancy. The diagnostic thresholds for Type 2 diabetes using the 2 hour OGTT glucose value, fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c (11.1 mmol/l, 7.0 mmol/l, and 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) respectively) were all defined as the values above which one can see development of the diabetic microvascular complication of retinopathy. It was recognised that the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in populations will not be exactly the same when using each of these three different Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Nhs

Diabetes And The Nhs

National spotlight for York research into cost of diabetes treatment Research by the York Health Economic Consortium (YHEC) has projected that the NHS’s annual spending on diabetes in the UK will increase from £9.8 billion to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years - a rise that means the NHS would be spending 17 per cent of its entire budget on the condition. BBC Radio 4’s Today programme highlighted the Impact Diabetes report which also suggests that the cost of treating diabetes complications (including kidney failure, nerve damage, stroke, blindness and amputation) is expected to almost double from the current total of £7.7 billion to £13.5 billion by 2035/6. Developed in partnership with Diabetes UK, JDRF and Sanofi Diabetes, the report was published in the journal Diabetic Medicine. It highlighted the high percentage (79 per cent) of NHS diabetes spending that goes on complications – many of which are preventable – and speculates that investing in the checks and services that help people manage the condition and therefore reduce risk of complications could actually be less expensive than the current approach. The report quantifies the current costs of direct patient care for diabetes (which includes treatment, intervention and complications) and indirect costs of diabetes, such as those related to increased death and illness, work loss and the need for informal care, and also predicts the UK’s future costs of diabetes. According to the report, the total cost associated with diabetes in the UK currently stands at £23.7 billion and is predicted to rise to £39.8 billion by 2035/6. Diabetes is a prominent disease in the UK which has a significant societal and economic burden. Key findings from the report include: There are currently around 3.8 million peo Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

There's no cure for diabetes, so treatment aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and to control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you'll be referred for specialist treatment from a diabetes care team. They'll be able to help you understand your treatment and closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. Type 1 diabetes occurs because your body doesn't produce any insulin. This means you'll need regular insulin treatment to keep your glucose levels normal. Insulin comes in several different preparations, each of which works slightly differently. For example, some last up to a whole day (long-acting), some last up to eight hours (short-acting) and some work quickly but don't last very long (rapid-acting). Your treatment is likely to include a combination of different insulin preparations. Insulin Insulin injections If you have type 1 diabetes, you'll probably need insulin injections. Insulin must be injected, because if it were taken as a tablet, it would be broken down in your stomach (like food) and would be unable to enter your bloodstream. When you're first diagnosed, your diabetes care team will help you with your insulin injections, before showing you how and when to do it yourself. They'll also show you how to store your insulin and dispose of your needles properly. Insulin injections are usually given by an injection pen, which is also known as an insulin pen or auto-injector. Sometimes, injections are given using a syringe. Most people need two to four injections a day. Your GP or diabetes nurse may also teach one of your close friends or relatives how to inject the insulin properly. Insulin pump therapy Insulin pump therapy is an alter Continue reading >>

Nhs Diabetes Prevention Programme (nhs Dpp)

Nhs Diabetes Prevention Programme (nhs Dpp)

Most people would be shocked to know that around 22,000 people with diabetes die early every year. Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age and is a major contributor to kidney failure, heart attack, and stroke. There are currently 3.4 million people with Type 2 diabetes in England with around 200,000 new diagnoses every year. While Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented and is not linked to lifestyle, Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through lifestyle changes. One in six of all people in hospital have diabetes – while diabetes is often not the reason for admission, they often need a longer stay in hospital, are more likely to be re admitted and their risk of dying is higher. As well as the human cost, Type 2 diabetes treatment accounts for just under nine per cent of the annual NHS budget. This is around £8.8 billion a year. There are currently five million people in England at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. If these trends persist, one in three people will be obese by 2034 and one in 10 will develop Type 2 diabetes. There is strong international evidence which demonstrates how behavioural interventions, which support people to maintain a healthy weight and be more active, can significantly reduce the risk of developing the condition. The Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) identifies those at high risk and refers them onto a behaviour change programme. The NHS DPP is a joint commitment from NHS England, Public Health England and Diabetes UK. We are currently piloting a digital stream of the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme. Contact us If you are a participant on the programme and have a query, or if you are interested in getting involved in your local scheme, please contact your GP. N Continue reading >>

Endocrinology And Diabetes

Endocrinology And Diabetes

Endocrinologists and diabetologists (ED) are medical doctors who investigate, diagnose and treat disorders of the endocrine system. This page provides useful information on the nature of the work, the common procedures/interventions, sub-specialties and other roles that may interest you. Nature of the work The main glands of the endocrine system are the adrenal glands, ovaries and testicles, pancreas, pituitary gland, parathyroid glands and thyroid gland. These glands secrete hormones (chemical messengers) into the circulation which have an effect on specific organs of the body. Endocrinology and diabetes is predominantly an outpatient specialty but a number of patients require hospital admission for complex investigations or the management of complications. Furthermore, at least 15% of hospital inpatients have diabetes mellitus or other endocrine conditions. Increasingly, hospital-based specialists manage diabetes patients jointly with colleagues in primary care and training has been adjusted to reflect this. Patients usually have chronic conditions and management is holistic and long term often in a multidisciplinary team fashion. Endocrinologists and diabetologists treat conditions such as: diabetes mellitus thyroid disease endocrine disorders of the reproductive system, such as polycystic ovary syndrome adrenal disease bone and calcium disorders pituitary disease endocrine late effects of cancer treatment Common procedures/interventions These include: programmed investigations for complex endocrine disorders pre and post-operative management of endocrine patients and patients with diabetes management of diabetic and endocrine emergencies such as ketoacidosis and hypercalcaemia management of diabetes and endocrine conditions during pregnancy multidisciplinary working Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Audit

National Diabetes Audit

The National Diabetes Audit (NDA) is the one of the largest annual clinical audits in the world, integrating data from both primary and secondary care sources, making it the most comprehensive audit of its kind. To find out more about the NDA Programme check out this short presentation, or view a power point presentation here Latest Reports National Diabetes Audit Report 1 Care Processes and Treatment Targets 2016-17 A short report for the NDA 16-17 collection was published on the 10 November 2017. This is a small national report accompanied by GP, CCG, LHB and specialist service level data. A full report will be published in March 2018, which will contain the full key findings, recommendations, results of analysis for multiple readings, and information for learning disability and severe mental illness. The link to the short report is here. The National Diabetes Audit Insulin Pump Report 2015-16 The Insulin Pump Audit collects information on the number of people with diabetes using an insulin pump, the reason for going on an insulin pump and the outcomes achieved since starting the pump. The report and supporting documentation is available here. National Diabetes Audit Complications and Mortality 2015-2016 Report This report, Report 2a and an accompanying Report 2b, from the National Diabetes Audit (NDA) covers complications of diabetes. The reports and supporting documentation are available here For the audit reports for previous audit years please check out the link on the right hand side "Access the audit reports" including patient friendly versions of the reports. National Diabetes Audit 2017-18 collection The 2017-18 collection for the NDA will incorporate information about people with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia. A pilot was carried out with 22 GP practices in Eng Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk Read more about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Read about the causes and risk factors for type 2 diabetes Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Read mor Continue reading >>

The Nhs Is Turning To Tech To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

The Nhs Is Turning To Tech To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Last year, the NHS launched a diabetes prevention programme aimed at helping high-risk patients stop or delay the onset of full-blown Type 2 diabetes. NHS England has now announced that it's turning to tech for the second phase of the project, and will pilot the use of digital tools and wearables to further the programme's goal. Eight regions in the UK will aim to recruit over 5,000 patients in total over the next six months to take part in a year-long trial of new ways to tackle obesity and high blood sugar levels, both of which are common precursors to Type 2 diabetes. Many of the resources on offer to participants revolve around promoting a healthier lifestyle to help bring blood sugar levels down. These include online personal coaching sessions, support groups, and various apps designed to help you set positive goals and achieve them. Some patients will also receive wearables as part of the programme. In one intensive six-week course by OurPath, a wearable will be paired with a smart weighing scale. A longer-term project will see participants wear Buddi's medical-grade Nujjer activity, sleep and eating tracker. The Nujjer wristband and app is specifically designed to decrease the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The NHS has thought about how activity tracking could be used to promote healthier lifestyles before, but this diabetes prevention programme is the first time wearables have been made available to NHS patients. Encouraging people to lead healthier lives can help prevent any number of illnesses developing, but wearable tech is becoming increasingly valuable in treating diabetes. Rumor has it a future generation of the Apple Watch could even include glucose monitoring functionality to help diabetics better manage their chronic condition. Continue reading >>

Nhs 'wastes Billions On Diabetes'

Nhs 'wastes Billions On Diabetes'

The majority of NHS spending on diabetes is avoidable, says a report in the journal Diabetic Medicine. It suggests that 80% of the NHS's £9.8bn annual UK diabetes bill goes on the cost of treating complications. Experts say much of this is preventable with health checks and better education - something the Department of Health says it is tackling. The report also predicts that by 2035, diabetes will cost the NHS £16.8bn, 17% of its entire budget. If this rise in diabetes is allowed to continue, it will simply be disastrous for NHS budgetsBaroness Barbara Young, Chief executive of Diabetes UK BBC Health: Diabetes treatment There are 3.8 million people living with diabetes in the UK. The study looked at annual direct patient care costs for both types of diabetes, with Type 2 at £8.8bn being far higher than that of Type 1 at £1bn. Both Type 1 diabetes, which tends to appear in childhood, and Type 2 diabetes, often linked to diet, lead to problems controlling the amount of sugar in the blood. Complications occur when people with diabetes sustain high levels of glucose over a long period. This can lead to increased chances of developing disease-related complications, such as kidney failure, nerve damage, damage to the retina, stroke and cardiovascular disease. Budget crash Baroness Barbara Young, from Diabetes UK - one of the charities involved in the Impact Diabetes report - said: "The report shows that without urgent action, the already huge sums of money spent on treating diabetes will rise to unsustainable levels that threaten to bankrupt the NHS. "If this rise in diabetes is allowed to continue, as is happening at the moment, it will simply be disastrous for the NHS and wreck NHS budgets. I think we have a car crash coming. "But the most shocking part of this report Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Watch Tom's story (NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme) This animation follows Tom who has been told he is at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. It looks at how Tom can prevent the disease from developing and how he got the help and support he needed from the Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme. News and blogs A flagship NHS diabetes prevention scheme has succeeded in signing up significantly more people than expected according to a comprehensive progress report published today (20 December) in leading academic health journal, Diabetic Medicine. The report which is co-authored by experts from NHS England, Public Heath England and the charity Diabetes UK, charts the positive impact […] Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 1 diabetes. Other types of diabetes are covered separately (read about type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes, which affects some women during pregnancy). Symptoms of diabetes Typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes are: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk The symptoms of type 1 diabetes usually develop very quickly in young people (over a few days or weeks). In adults, the symptoms often take longer to develop (a few months). Read more about the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. These symptoms occur because the lack of insulin means that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Find your local GP service Read about how type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. Causes of type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin. So, glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Type 1 diabetes is o Continue reading >>

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