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Diabetes: A Disease That Is Ravaging Indian Country

Diabetes: A Disease That Is Ravaging Indian Country

Diabetes: A disease that is ravaging Indian Country By Tim Giago (Nanwica Kciji Stands Up For Them) Over the years I have written about the epidemic that is the scourge of Indian Country: Diabetes. It is a disease that hits close to home. My younger sister Shirley suffered with it. First she lost a leg, and then an arm and had to go on dialysis much too young. Diabetes eventually proved too much for her and she died at a young age. My sister Sophie also died of the ravages of diabetes. Eric Yellow Boy, a longtime friend and employee, was admitted to Rapid City Regional Hospital on Friday due to problems related to his diabetes. My wife and I went to the hospital to visit him on Saturday and we were told that he was in surgery and we found out that he was about to lose a leg. I spoke with him today for the first time since he lost his leg. We were talking about his doctor and how they had taken him to surgery on Saturday and he said it happened so fast that he didnt have time to ask any questions. He said, Yesterday, after coming out of the recovery room, the pain was so bad that the doctor had to put me under anesthesia again. He started to tell me about what happened on Sunday. He said, I looked down at my leg for the first time and then he couldnt go on. It was such a shock to see that his leg was gone he couldnt go on talking about it. We talked for a little while more and he said he is looking forward to rehab and getting back to work. Eric is a young man with a great sense of humor and a solid and reliable worker. He has worked for me for several years and suffered from his illness during all of those years. Perhaps there were times when he didnt take as good a care of himself as he should have, but it seems that people with diabetes have a tendency to do that. On Continue reading >>

Insulin Quality Questions Have Diabetes Experts Scrambling

Insulin Quality Questions Have Diabetes Experts Scrambling

Insulin quality questions have diabetes experts scrambling Pharmacist and researcher Alan Carter raised a stir with his recently published study finding that a variety of insulin vials he tested seemed to hold far less of the lifesaving hormone than they should. RENTON, N.J. Preliminary research suggesting that some diabetes patients may be injecting medicine that has partially disintegrated is causing concern even as serious questions are raised about the research itself. The study author, a pharmacist, bought vials of insulin at a number of pharmacies and found that on average the vials had less than half of what was listed on the label and none met a minimum standard. The study tested just 18 vials of insulin far too few to be definitive and questions have been raised about the methods used to test the insulin. Insulin makers, patient advocate groups, and diabetes experts say if the findings were accurate, diabetes patients would be getting sick. But given potentially serious implications for millions of diabetics, many of these groups are now trying to reassure patients in the wake of the research. All say that patients should continue to taking their insulin as prescribed. The Real World, Diabetes: As cameras roll at a Jamaican resort, desperate patients seek healing The groups are discussing how to quickly mount a major study that would ease fears by involving multiple research labs, different testing methods and many more samples of various insulin types. We want to make sure the study, when completed, will be well accepted, said Dr. William Cefalu, the American Diabetes Associations chief scientific officer. Roughly 6 million Americans inject synthetic insulin every day. Most patients use a syringe to draw insulin from a vial, like the ones tested in the study, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diagnoses Have More Than Doubled In 20 Years, Uk Analysis Suggests

Diabetes Diagnoses Have More Than Doubled In 20 Years, Uk Analysis Suggests

Diabetes diagnoses have more than doubled in 20 years, UK analysis suggests Diagnoses of all diabetes types have shot up since 1998, says Diabetes UK as it calls for greater efforts to lower risk of type 2 Last modified on Mon 26 Feb 2018 19.50EST Diagnosis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has increased, but the rise has been greater for type 2, which some experts link to higher obesity rates.Photograph: Alfsky/Getty Images The number of adults and older teens with diabetes in the UK has more than doubled over the past 20 years, with 3.7 million people aged 17 or older now known to be living with the disease, campaigners say. A new analysis, compiled by the charity Diabetes UK, appears to show that the number of diagnoses has shot up since 1998, at which point it is estimated 1.8 million over 16s were diagnosed with diabetes. 'The hardest thing is waking up and part of your body has gone' The analysis does not break down figures into the two main forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. But Nikki Joule, policy manager at Diabetes UK, said that other research had shown diagnoses of both have increased, but the rise has been greater for type 2. [The] rise in obesity has driven that largely over recent years, she said. While both types of diabetes are linked to genetics, type 1 diabetes is not associated with weight but is an autoimmune condition where insulin is not produced. It normally begins in childhood and accounts for about 10% of diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes where little insulin is produced, or insulin does not trigger an uptake of glucose by the bodys cells is linked to obesity , and typically starts later in life, with about 60% of cases thought to be preventable . Both types bring with them the risk of complications such as blindness, stroke, cardiovascular d Continue reading >>

News | Tandem Diabetes Care

News | Tandem Diabetes Care

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Upcoming Conference Presentations SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today announced that Kim Blickenstaff , president and CEO, will present a company update at the following Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Upcoming Conference Presentations SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar. 7, 2018-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today announced that Kim Blickenstaff , president and CEO, will present a company update at the Tandem Diabetes Care Announces 2017 Financial Results SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today reported its financial results for the year and quarter ended December 31, 2017 and financial guidance for Tandem Diabetes Care Applies for Health Canada Medical Device License Commercial launch of the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump in Canada planned for 2H 2018 SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps, today announced its submission of a medical device license Tandem Diabetes Care and Rubin Medical Announce Agreement for Distribution of Insulin Pump Products in Scandinavia SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today announced that it has entered into a distribution agreement Continue reading >>

High-fiber Foods May Boost Gut Bacteria To Control Diabetes

High-fiber Foods May Boost Gut Bacteria To Control Diabetes

High-Fiber Foods May Boost Gut Bacteria to Control Diabetes High-Fiber Foods May Boost Gut Bacteria to Control Diabetes Rutgers-led study finds fiber fermenting bacteria promotes glucose control, greater weight loss and better lipid levels Professor Liping Zhao, the Eveleigh-Fenton Chair of Applied Microbiology at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, is the study's lead author. Inner Ear Stem Cells May Someday Restore Hearing The fight against type 2 diabetes may soon improve thanks to a pioneering high-fiber diet study led by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick professor. Promotion of a select group of gut bacteria by a diet high in diverse fibers led to better blood glucose control, greater weight loss and better lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes, according to research published today in Science . The study, underway for six years, provides evidence that eating more of the right dietary fibers may rebalance the gut microbiota, or the ecosystem of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract that help digest food and are important for overall human health. Our study lays the foundation and opens the possibility that fibers targeting this group of gut bacteria could eventually become a major part of your diet and your treatment, said Liping Zhao , the studys lead author and a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology , School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers UniversityNew Brunswick . Type 2 diabetes , one of the most common debilitating diseases, develops when the pancreas makes too little insulin a hormone that helps glucose enter cells for use as energy or the body doesnt use insulin well. In the gut, many bacteria break down carbohydrates, such as dietary fibers, and produce short-chain fatty acids that nourish our gut lining ce Continue reading >>

Wausau Dad Accused Of Letting Diabetic Son Bryden Glazner Die

Wausau Dad Accused Of Letting Diabetic Son Bryden Glazner Die

CONNECT TWEET LINKEDIN 5 COMMENTEMAILMORE WAUSAU - A Wausau mancharged with homicide in his diabetic son's death did not check his son's glucose levels or seek medical help even after the son was sick and vomiting all day, court records say. Robert Glazner was charged Wednesday with second-degree reckless homicide in the death of his son, Bryden Glazner. He is being held in the Marathon County jail on a cash bond of $500,000. Bryden,15, died Aug. 4 from diabetes complications while in the care of his father in Wausau. Robert Glaznerwas arrested Tuesday in Sheboygan and brought back to Wausau. Glazner's attorney said Wednesday that Glazner moved recently because of all that had happened in Marathon County. Bryden, a student at Mosinee High School,was living with Glazner at the home of Bryden's grandmother Linda Glaznerinthe 900 Block of Parcher Street, according to the criminal complaint. Linda Glaznerarrived home and found Bryden cold to the touch and called police, she said, according to the complaint. Autopsy and toxicology tests determined he had died from alack of care for his diabetes,according tothe Wausau Police Department. Bryden was diagnosed in December 2014 with Type 1 diabetes after being taken to the hospital because he hadn't stopped vomiting for four days, and was thirsty, the complaint said. Doctors determined he was suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis a potentially fatal condition and that Bryden's father needed to help him manage the disease. Bryden's parents were divorced, and he was staying with each parent on a rotating basis. Bryden's mother,Lynn Koshalek, told USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin on Wednesdaythat Robert Glazner's arrestis like reliving her son's death. "All I can say is that I tried to get help," she said in a brief telephone interview, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Actually Five Separate Diseases, Research Suggests

Diabetes Is Actually Five Separate Diseases, Research Suggests

Diabetes is actually five separate diseases, research suggests By James Gallagher Health and science correspondent, BBC News These are external links and will open in a new window Image caption Could there be five types of diabetes rather than just two? Scientists say diabetes is five separate diseases, and treatment could be tailored to each form. Diabetes - or uncontrolled blood sugar levels - is normally split into type 1 and type 2. But researchers in Sweden and Finland think the more complicated picture they have uncovered will usher in an era of personalised medicine for diabetes. Experts said the study was a herald of the future of diabetes care but changes to treatment would not be immediate. Diabetes affects about one in 11 adults worldwide and increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and limb amputation. Type 1 diabetes is a disease of the immune system, which affects around 10% of people with the condition in the UK. It errantly attacks the body's insulin factories (beta-cells) so there is not enough of the hormone to control blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes is largely seen as a disease of poor lifestyle as body fat can affect the way the insulin works. The study, by Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden and the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, looked at 14,775 patients including a detailed analysis of their blood. The results, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology , showed the patients could be separated into five distinct clusters. Cluster 1 - severe autoimmune diabetes is broadly the same as the classical type 1 - it hit people when they were young, seemingly healthy and an immune disease left them unable to produce insulin Cluster 2 - severe insulin-deficient diabetes patients initially looked ver Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough? Scientists Discover Five Distinct Types

Diabetes Breakthrough? Scientists Discover Five Distinct Types

Diabetes breakthrough? Scientists discover FIVE distinct types Diabetes breakthrough? Scientists discover FIVE distinct types SCIENTISTS have discovered five distinct types of diabetes, offering new hope for better treatments, it was announced yesterday. Traditionally, the killer disease has been split into two types by medics. Type 1 is an auto-immune disease which cannot currently be cured. PUBLISHED: PUBLISHED: 23:30, Thu, Mar 1, 2018 Scientists have discovered five distinct types of diabetes, offering new hope for better treatments Type 2 on the other hand can be avoided by making lifestyle changes such as taking more exercise and eating a healthy diet. However, in the new study, researchers found that separating adult-onset diabetes into five distinct different types - rather than just type 1 or type 2 - could help to better tailor early treatment for patients. It would also represent a first step towards precision medicine in the disease, they said. In the new analysis, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal, five types of the disease were found. Each had different characteristics and were associated with different complications, illustrating the varied treatment needs of patients with diabetes. Lead author of the new study Professor Leif Groop, of the Lund University Diabetes Centre (LUDC), Sweden, and Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), said: Evidence suggests that early treatment for diabetes is crucial to prevent life-shortening complications. More accurately diagnosing diabetes could give us valuable insights into how it will develop over time, allowing us to predict and treat complications before they develop. Type 2 diabetes: Seven meal plans for your weight loss diet He added: Existing treatment guidelines are limited by the Continue reading >>

There Are Five Types Of Diabetes Not Two, Say Scientists

There Are Five Types Of Diabetes Not Two, Say Scientists

There are five types of diabetes not two, say scientists Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar, which can lead to complications such as blindness and amputations Diabetes falls into five categories rather than two, according to a study that promises new personalised treatments. Researchers identified genetically marked groupings of the disease that vary by severity, age at which they most often occur and probable complications. They may explain why diabetics respond differently to treatment. At present the disease is classified by two forms. Type 1 is an autoimmune condition where the body mistakenly attacks the pancreas, stopping it from producing insulin. The more common form, type 2, is linked to obesity and stops the body from making enough insulin or reacting to its production. Researchers believe that type 2 encompasses four kinds of diabetes, each affecting different age groups and carrying distinct threats. By analysing 13,270 diabetics,. the study identified three Continue reading >>

Researchers Identify Five Types Of Diabetes

Researchers Identify Five Types Of Diabetes

Researchers identify five types of diabetes Five distinct types of diabetes could replace the current type one or two classification, according to a new study of nearly 15,000 diabetes patients. The paper, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal , established five types of the condition which were genetically distinct, with different characteristics and associated complications. Researchers have said that this new classification system could help to identify patients at high risk of complications, and provide guidance on the choice of treatment. The study, which looked at patients in Sweden and Finland with adult-onset diabetes, identified three severe and two mild forms of the disease. The research used four cohort studies, totalling 14,775 patients, and analysed six measurements used to monitor patients with diabetes, including long-term glycaemic control, insulin resistance and the presence of auto-antibodies associated with autoimmune diabetes. They also conducted genetic analyses and compared disease progression, treatment, and the development of complications for each type. Lead author of the study at Lund University Diabetes Centre Professor Leif Groop commented: Evidence suggests that early treatment for diabetes is crucial to prevent life-shortening complications. More accurately diagnosing diabetes could give us valuable insights into how it will develop over time, allowing us to predict and treat complications before they develop. Existing treatment guidelines are limited by the fact they respond to poor metabolic control when it has developed, but do not have the means to predict which patients will need intensified treatment. This study moves us towards a more clinically useful diagnosis, and represents an important step towards precision Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cure 'in Sight'

Diabetes Cure 'in Sight'

A cure for diabetes may be in sight, according to a new study. In what is being hailed as the biggest step forward in the development of a treatment for the condition, which affects 1.4million Britons, experts have found a way to reverse it using a form of gene therapy. Although experiments have so far been carried out successfully only on animals, scientists say the breakthrough paves the way for trials in humans. The Korean and Canadian experts cured rats and mice of diabetes by replacing malfunctioning genes which stop diabetics producing insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. They genetically altered an aden-ovirus - a type of germ which causes chest infections - so that it could carry a gene that releases insulin directly to the liver and pancreas. The scientists, whose research is published today in the scientific journal Nature, hoped the gene would replace the malfunctioning one that caused diabetes. They were amazed when a simple injection meant the animals, which were all suffering from the more serious type 1 diabetes, went into remission without any noticeable side effects. They continued to produce insulin for another eight months after the injection, the scientists from Yonsei University in Seoul and Calgary University report. Though they stressed it was too early to say if the therapy would work in humans, they hailed it as a significant step forward. 'This gene therapy may have potential therapeutic value for the cure of auto-immune diabetes in humans,' they said. Dr Jerrold Olefsky, a diabetes expert at California University, said, 'This represents a definite step forward and offers a good example of how fundamental research can be applied to problems of human health.' Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The News

Diabetes In The News

PhRMA Staff | March 9, 2011 | SHARE THIS A story in Medical News Today points out where the greatest incidences of diabetes are in the U.S. It paints a telling demographic picture of diabetes and how it is increasingly a major health issue. But it also keeps us coming back to a topic we talk about frequently - the cost of chronic conditions like diabetes to both patients and the economy. If you've not already visited, take a look at the website for the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease for more information about the effort to prevent and treat chronic diseases and why it is so important to patients, their health and our economy. Also, because diabetes is such a growing problem, it is worth remembering that America's biopharmaceutical research companies are today developing new medicines to fight diabetes and related conditions and that are now being tested or under FDA review for approval. Oh, and also check out this clip from yesterday morning's Today Show , a interesting report on some of the dangers when medicines are not appropriately used. Continue reading >>

Endocrinology Diabetes

Endocrinology Diabetes

Group medical visits fail to improve outcomes in patients with diabetes Group medical visits the combination of group self-management education and one-on-one consultations with clinicians did not improve several medical outcomes in patients with diabetes, according to findings recently published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. While diabetes group visits have been evaluated before, most evaluations have been pilots or randomized-controlled trials. This is one of the first studies evaluating the impact of a diabetes group visit in a real world clinical setting, Amy T. Cunningham, PhD, MPH, of the department of family and community medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, told Healio Family Medicine. Overweight in boys increases risk for type 2 diabetes in adulthood Boys with overweight at age 7 years that persists through adolescence and early adulthood are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes as adults vs. men without childhood Diabetes increases risk for complications after surgery Adults with diabetes who underwent inpatient surgery had increased risks during the following 6 months for mortality, major complications, ICU admission, need for Continue reading >>

The American College Of Physicians Recommends A1c Levels Between 7 And 8 Percent : Shots - Health News : Npr

The American College Of Physicians Recommends A1c Levels Between 7 And 8 Percent : Shots - Health News : Npr

A major medical association today suggested that doctors who treat people with Type 2 diabetes can set less aggressive blood sugar targets. But medical groups that specialize in diabetes sharply disagree. Half a dozen medical groups have looked carefully at the best treatment guidelines for the 29 million Americans who have Type 2 diabetes and have come up with somewhat differing guidelines. The American College of Physicians has reviewed those guidelines to provide its own recommendations , published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. It has decided that less stringent goals are appropriate for the key blood sugar test, called the A1C. "There are harms associated with overzealous treatment or inappropriate treatment focused on A1C targets," says Dr. Jack Ende , president of the ACP. "And for that reason, this is not the kind of situation where the college could just sit back and ignore things." The ACP, which represents internists, recommends that doctors aim for an A1C in the range of 7 to 8 percent, not the lower levels that other groups recommend. For people who have already achieved a lower level, "consider de-intensifying treatment," Ende says. "That is, reducing one of the medications, stopping a medication, just allow the A1C to be between 7 and 8." This Chef Lost 50 Pounds And Reversed Prediabetes With A Digital Program Some studies have shown that people who have aggressively pushed to lower their blood sugar are at somewhat higher risk of premature death. People also suffer from low blood sugar as a result of aggressive treatment. That was the case for Valerie Pennington, a special-needs teacher who lives in Odessa, Mo. She was diagnosed in her mid-40s and put on an aggressive treatment regime. "The nurse at school because I was going low so much made me ge Continue reading >>

Top Diabetes News Of Today

Top Diabetes News Of Today

Truck Drivers Risk for Diabetes Far Greater Than National Average BY ERIC MILLER:Health education specialist Kay Pfeiffer compares diabetic professional truck drivers who are not testing their blood sugar with driving at night without headlights and youre going to crash. Pfeiffer, a vice president at diabetes management company TrueLifeCare, said there are an estimated 500,000 diabetic truck drivers in the United States about one of every seven. As a group, truck drivers have a 50% higher rate of diabetes than the national average. (read more) Diabetes type 2 best exercise to lower blood sugar BY MATT ATHERTON: If you have high blood sugar, the best exercise you could do to relieve symptoms is to go cycling, its been revealed. Diabetes patients should do more cycling, as it reduces pressure on the feet, according to medical website Patient.info. Looking after your feet is very important if you have diabetes, as the condition can lower the blood supply to your lower extremities. (read more) Is this how abdominal fat leads to diabetes? BY ANA SANDOIU:When it comes to the harmful consequences of excess fat, the way it is distributed across the body is key. Medical News Todayhave recently reported onstudiesshowing that abdominal fat is deeply tied totype 2 diabetesandheart disease. We have also coveredstudiessuggesting that women, in particular, could be at an increased cardiometabolic risk if they have a higher waist-to-hip ratio. (read more) Food Insecurity Tied to Poor Glycemic Control in Diabetes BY HEALTHDAY NEWS:Limited food access owing to cost (food insecurity) is associated with increased hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C) among patients with diabetes, according to a study published online March 19 inDiabetes Care. Seth A. Berkowitz, MD, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Continue reading >>

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