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Diabetes News 2018

American Diabetes Association Issues First Updates To 2018 Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes

American Diabetes Association Issues First Updates To 2018 Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes

American Diabetes Association Issues First Updates to 2018 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes The American Diabetes Associations (ADAs) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes (Standards of Care) provide the latest in comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of children and adults with type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes; strategies to improve the prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes; and therapeutic approaches that reduce complications and positively affect health outcomes. New this year, the ADA is updating and revising the online version of the Standards of Care throughout the year with annotations for new evidence or regulatory changes that merit immediate incorporation. Today, the ADA revised its Standards of Care to include two important updates: A revised definition of hypoglycemia (Sections 6 and 14): The December 2017 issue of Diabetes Care featured a Consensus Report from the ADA and others in the diabetes community on clinically meaningful outcome measures beyond A1C for type 1 diabetes, which categorized hypoglycemia into three levels. The ADA has updated Section 6 - Glycemic Targets and Section 14 - Diabetes Care in the Hospital of the 2018 Standards of Care to align with the hypoglycemia definitions in the Consensus Report. The addition of two new, FDA-approved drugs (Section 8): In December 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the GLP-1 receptor agonist semaglutide and the SGLT2 inhibitor ertugliflozin as adjuncts to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. These medications have been added to Section 8 - Pharmacologic Approaches to Glycemic Treatment. The complete Standards of Care was published December 8, 2017, and is available online . With the rapid Continue reading >>

Whats Your Risk Of Kidney Disease, Heart Attack, Or Diabetes? A Single Molecule Can Tell

Whats Your Risk Of Kidney Disease, Heart Attack, Or Diabetes? A Single Molecule Can Tell

Whats your risk of kidney disease, heart attack, or diabetes? A single molecule can tell Nick Henry first experienced the symptoms of kidney disease in 2004, shortly after the 19-year-old had a severe reaction to a spider bite. "I woke up one morning, and I was just swollen from head to toe," he recalls. But doctors managed Henry's disease, allowing him to return to his unusually active lifestyleincluding baseball, softball, basketball, flag football, golf, and fishingin his northeast Louisiana hometown of West Monroe. Shortly after he witnessed the death of his mother in a motor scooter accident in 2012, however, Henry's renal health took a dramatic turn for the worse. "It's almost as if my body went into shock," he says. "Within a couple months, boom, I started swelling up again." That swelling was a sign that his kidneys were no longer working normally. A biopsy confirmed that he had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a severe form of kidney disease. In FSGS, the kidney's glomerulithe microscopic filtration units that sieve excess fluid and waste products from the bloodbecome overly leaky; essential proteins such as albumin seep out, disrupting blood chemistry and causing fluid to leak from the blood vessels into tissues throughout the body. Henry's condition deteriorated so rapidly that by July 2014, his doctors in Shreveport, Louisiana, decided to remove both diseased kidneys. The next month, Henry received a transplanted kidney from his identical twin, Nate, who was healthy, even though FSGS can be genetic in origin. Within a day of the transplant, however, Henry felt like the swelling was coming back. At first, his doctors reassured him that he was doing fine. "Once they checked my urine, saw me spilling a bunch of protein again," he says, "they realized Continue reading >>

News | Tandem Diabetes Care

News | Tandem Diabetes Care

Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Upcoming Conference Presentations SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today announced that Kim Blickenstaff , president and CEO, will present a company update at the following Tandem Diabetes Care Announces Upcoming Conference Presentations SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar. 7, 2018-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today announced that Kim Blickenstaff , president and CEO, will present a company update at the Tandem Diabetes Care Announces 2017 Financial Results SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today reported its financial results for the year and quarter ended December 31, 2017 and financial guidance for Tandem Diabetes Care Applies for Health Canada Medical Device License Commercial launch of the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump in Canada planned for 2H 2018 SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps, today announced its submission of a medical device license Tandem Diabetes Care and Rubin Medical Announce Agreement for Distribution of Insulin Pump Products in Scandinavia SAN DIEGO --(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. (NASDAQ: TNDM), a medical device company and manufacturer of the only touchscreen insulin pumps available in the United States , today announced that it has entered into a distribution agreement Continue reading >>

Why Zero-calorie Sweeteners Can Still Lead To Diabetes, Obesity

Why Zero-calorie Sweeteners Can Still Lead To Diabetes, Obesity

Why zero-calorie sweeteners can still lead to diabetes, obesity April 22, 2018, Experimental Biology 2018 Increased awareness of the health consequences of eating too much sugar has fueled a dramatic uptick in the consumption of zero-calorie artificial sweeteners in recent decades. However, new research finds sugar replacements can also cause health changes that are linked with diabetes and obesity, suggesting that switching from regular to diet soda may be a case of 'out of the frying pan, into the fire.' Artificial sweeteners are one of the most common food additives worldwide, frequently consumed in diet and zero-calorie sodas and other products. While some previous studies have linked artificial sweeteners with negative health consequences , earlier research has been mixed and raised questions about potential bias related to study sponsorship. This new study is the largest examination to date that tracks biochemical changes in the bodyusing an approach known as unbiased high-throughput metabolomicsafter consumption of sugar or sugar substitutes. Researchers also looked at impacts on vascular health by studying how the substances affect the lining of blood vessels . The studies were conducted in rats and cell cultures. "Despite the addition of these non-caloric artificial sweeteners to our everyday diets, there has still been a drastic rise in obesity and diabetes," said lead researcher Brian Hoffmann, PhD, assistant professor in the department of biomedical engineering at the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University. "In our studies, both sugar and artificial sweeteners seem to exhibit negative effects linked to obesity and diabetes, albeit through very different mechanisms from each other." Hoffmann will present the research at the American Physiologi Continue reading >>

Could Artificial Sweeteners And Diet Soda Also Lead To Diabetes?

Could Artificial Sweeteners And Diet Soda Also Lead To Diabetes?

Could Artificial Sweeteners And Diet Soda Also Lead To Diabetes? Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own. Does zero calories necessarily mean zero increase in diabetes risk? (Photo by Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images) Artificial sweeteners mayhavezero calories, but do they offer zero additional risk for developing diabetes? Well, if you attended a presentation at the Experimental Biology 2018 conference in San Diego , you may say, rats, the risk may be far from zero. To be fair, nothing has zero health risk. Even though eating broccoli in general is quite healthy, you could still bludgeon yourself with broccoli, and eating huge amounts of broccoli could lead to obesity as well as some serious gas and loss of friends. However, the main advertised benefit of artificial sweeteners, such as those in diet soda, is thatthey don't contain the calories and the accompanying obesity, diabetes, and other health-related risks ofsugar. The study presented by Brian Hoffmann, George Ronan, andDhanush Haspulafromthe Medical College of Wisconsin suggested that things may not be that sweet for artificial sweeteners. They did a combination of in vitro (which essential means inside a test tube or similar equipment) and in vivo (meaning in a live animal) experiments usingrats that were specially designed to be moresusceptible to developing diabetes. For the in vitro experiments, the research team placed cells from the inside lining of the rats' small blood vessels into test tubes and exposed these cells to either sugar or a common artificial sweetener. Why the inside lining of blood vessels? Well, one of the effects of diabetes is to cause damage to small blood vessels, which then results in many of the complications of diabetes such as loss of eyesight, kid Continue reading >>

This Scientific Breakthrough Could Be The Next Miracle Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

This Scientific Breakthrough Could Be The Next Miracle Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Attention, all type 1 diabetics: Your days of insulin injections may be numbered, thanks to a revolutionary new medicine. California-based company ViaCyte just developed a stem cell implant called PEC-Direct, and it could be the next miracle cure for diabetes. The implant grows insulin-producing cells from stem cells, which would eventually help manage glucose levels in type 1 diabetes patients. If the implant successfully passes the clinical trials, patients would no longer need to inject themselves with insulin. (And, more good news: researchers are looking into ways to reverse type 1 diabetes.) “Patients with high-risk type 1 diabetes complications, such as hypoglycemia unawareness, are at constant risk of life-threatening low blood glucose,” clinical trial investigator Jeremy Pettus from University of California, San Diego, said in a press release. “The PEC-Direct islet cell replacement therapy is designed to help patients with the most urgent medical need.” Placed just below the skin, these implants are no larger than credit cards—but they could have a life-changing impact for diabetics. As the stem cells mature inside the human body, they will become specialized pancreas cells that release insulin automatically when needed. “There are limited treatment options for patients with high-risk type 1 diabetes to manage life-threatening hypoglycemic episodes,” added ViaCyte president and CEO Paul Laikind. “We believe that the PEC-Direct product candidate has the potential to transform the lives of these patients.” Clinical trials just began last week. Two patients received injections of PEC-Direct implants and will be monitored for the next several months. If all goes according to plan, the cells will mature in three months and begin releasing insulin a Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Atom RSS Feed Type 1 diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) is an autoimmune disease in which immune cells attack and destroy the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. The loss of insulin leads to the inability to regulate blood sugar levels. Patients are usually treated by insulin-replacement therapy. Continue reading >>

The First Vaccine For Diabetes Could Be Ready For Human Trials In 2018

The First Vaccine For Diabetes Could Be Ready For Human Trials In 2018

After 25 laborious years of scientific study, researchers in Finland have finally found a connection between viral infection and the onset of Type 1 Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes News: Sufferers Of Life-altering Disease Targeted At Work | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes News: Sufferers Of Life-altering Disease Targeted At Work | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes sufferers are apparently quitting jobs due to lack of understanding A lack of understanding from their employers can make working with diabetes potentially life-threatening We heard from people who had to give up their jobs in order to manage their condition safely. Diabetes is one of the largest health crises of our time. Missing essential health checks or not taking medication on time can lead to devastating complications. Diabetes UK says three in five sufferers experience emotional or mental health problems. A fifth have used support or counselling from a trained professional to help them manage their condition, while a third have turned to self-help materials. More than a third of sufferers say their condition causes them difficulty at work, a quarter are forced to take time off for medical appointments, in addition to regular breaks for blood sugar testing, while seven per cent are too scared to tell anyone about it. The disturbing findings come from a survey run by Diabetes UK and completed by almost 10,000 people, of whom nearly nine in 10 said the condition made them feel down. The charity wants the results of its Future of Diabetes poll to start a national conversation about the impact of long-term health conditions in the workplace. To prevent the onset of potentially fatal complications, diabetes sufferers must have regular health checks and test their blood sugar levels several times a day. Type 1 occurs when the pancreas, a small gland behind the stomach, fails to produce insulin the hormone regulating blood glucose levels. If the amount of glucose is too high it can, over time, damage vital organs. Just 10 per cent of all sufferers have Type 1, but it is the most common type of childhood diabetes. In Type 2, the pancreas fails to produce enough Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. The start of a new year always brings curiosity about what's on tap in new diabetes technology, and we're excited to take an inside look, especially with the big JP Morgan Healthcare and Consumer Electronics Show events underway this month. Of course, these days Amazon and Google generate quite the medtech buzz, not to mention wearable smartwatches and Apple talk and the very many mobile health apps being developed . Some of the recent buzz includes FitBit investing $6M to develop a continuous glucose sensor, and rumors that Apple's developing its own super-secret continuous monitor built directly into its Apple Watch. On the flip side, you can't talk about innovation or D-tech these days without the lockstep concerns of access and affordability. It's encouraging to see reimbursement being more of a focus at the R&D stage of new products, and the latest news of Medicare coverage for the tubeless OmniPod pump and new Abbott FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitor are big moves forward. We've reached out to many leading diabetes vendors and combed through public reports from investor earnings calls and other news announcements to compile this (not exhaustive) look at what's ahead in D-tech for this coming year. You might refer to this as Artificial Pancreas systems , but whatever the name it's about "closing the loop" in glucose-monitoring and insulin dosing. While we won't see any fully closed loops (requiring no user intervention) on the market during 2018, we'll certainly see progress from numerous players. Beta Bionics: This B-Corp startup in Boston now has its fourth-generation prototype of its iLet4 system, a dual-hor Continue reading >>

Genetic Signature Predicts Diabetes Diagnosis

Genetic Signature Predicts Diabetes Diagnosis

Genetic signature predicts diabetes diagnosis University of Queensland researchers have found a way to identify infants who will go on to develop type 1 diabetes. UQ Diamantina Institute researcher Professor Ranjeny Thomas said the discovery would lead to the development of better screening tests to identify children at highest risk. "Most children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes do not have a family history, hence population screening could reduce life threatening complications before diagnosis," Professor Thomas said. "By looking at a child's gene activation pattern early in life, we are able to identify those who will progress to develop antibodies . "Once they have two antibodies, it's highly likely they will go on to develop type 1 diabetes. "As antibodies are infrequent in the general population, we are currently only using them to screen children from high-risk families in research programs." The team examined data collected over 10 years from two cohorts of children at risk of type 1 diabetes. They identified a seven-gene expression signature in infants in the first year of life, which when combined with a genetic risk score, identified children with a high-risk of developing diabetes antibodies. "This signature can screen out infants who are at low risk of developing type 1 diabetes, so that monitoring can be focused on children with highest risk," Professor Thomas said. Lady Cilento Children's Hospital paediatric endocrinologist Dr. Mark Harris said monitoring an at-risk child reduced the likelihood they would present with diabetic ketoacidosis, a medical emergency. "In children who are part of a monitoring program, the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis is less than five per cent," he said. "Currently we're seeing up to 40 per cent of children presenting with Continue reading >>

Taming An Unruly Target In Diabetes

Taming An Unruly Target In Diabetes

Focusing on a simple hormone in us all, a Yale researcher has found specific forms of it that poke toxic holes in cells a discovery that he is leveraging into a treatment for patients with diabetes. The research, published April 3 in Nature Communications , is also central to the recent awarding of two grants totaling $600,000 from the Connecticut Bioscience Innovation Fund and the Blavatnik Fund for Innovation at Yale. Andrew Miranker, a professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry and of chemical & environmental engineering , and his team will use these funds to translate the discoveries into novel therapies for type 2 diabetes. Part of this effort includes the formation of a new biotechnology company, ADM Therapeutics, based in Connecticut. Although the researchers are currently focusing on type 2 diabetes, the approaches they developed also apply to Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases. Type 2 diabetes is a degenerative ailment that affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its progression is tied directly to the health of insulin-producing cells in the islets groups of cells in the pancreas. These cells carefully coordinate the release of insulin in response to changes in blood glucose. Failure of these cells plays a significant role in the cause of the disease as the body loses the ability to regulate blood glucose. Currently available drugs work by stimulating alternative ways for the body to use or eliminate glucose. There are no approved drugs available to address the causes of type 2 diabetes. Mirankers lab is focused on a protein partner to insulin. The protein, known as islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), is also a hormone made by these same cells. The group has discovered that when IAPP adopts the wrong shape, it pokes holes in the membranes of i Continue reading >>

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Here are some "bits and pieces" updates for December. Update on Dr. Faustman's Phase-II Trial of BCG Dr. Faustman's lab has published their Fall 2017 newsletter, which you can read here: This newsletter includes more information on her research, especially from the 3rd International BCG conference, The BCG Working Group, and the 2nd edition of the BCG and Autoimmunity book she edited. There are three pieces of new news there: The phase-II trial was fully enrolled in Summer of 2017. This is important because we now know when the trial will end. Since this is a five year study, they should finish collecting data in Summer of 2022 and publish before Summer of 2023. They have given BCG to the three untreated patients from their phase-I trial, so they will have data from six people to report in the future. The lab is going to be recruiting for more studies in the future, so would like to hear from anyone who is interested in participating. No details on future trials were provided. Another piece of news is that Dr. Faustman is branching out, and trying to apply BCG treatment to Fibromyalgia. This research is being done in collaboration with EpicGenetics, and they hope to start the trial in early 2018. If anything applicable to the type-1 world comes up in this research, I'll report it. Since Fibromyalgia is not generally considered an autoimmune disease, I'm not sure how much "cross pollination" of results there will be. You can read more about it here: DILfrequency Trial Completed There is a lot of research ongoing on IL-2 which is part of the immune system. About 18 months ago, I summarized all this research here: with an update here: One of those clinical trials was called "DILfrequency" and that trial has finished, and the results published. The purpose of that trial was Continue reading >>

Finalists Announced For 2018 Diabetes Innovation Challenge

Finalists Announced For 2018 Diabetes Innovation Challenge

Finalists Announced for 2018 Diabetes Innovation Challenge Winners of $250,000 in Cash and In-Kind Prizes to be Announced at Live Event in Boston May 21 BOSTON, April 24, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- T1D Exchange , a nonprofit patient-centered research organization dedicated to accelerating novel treatments to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), today announced that 10 academic research teams and early stage companies have been named as finalists in the 2018 Diabetes Innovation Challenge , a world-wide competition to identify, nurture and advance innovative scientific and clinical solutions for diabetes. The announcement comes after proposals from 30 semi-finalists were reviewed by a panel of experts. Additionally, nearly 500 votes have been cast to date for a separate Peoples Choice Award. In all, 60 proposals were received from 17 countries. The opportunity for the community to review and vote for the Peoples Choice Award recipient is unique to the Diabetes Innovation Challenge, and a centerpiece of the T1D Exchange mission to connect patients to researchers and innovators. Those who wish to review descriptions of the entries and cast their vote for their favorite proposal are encouraged to go to the Vote Now link. Voting ends May 19, 2018. The 2018 Diabetes Innovation Challenge is presented by T1D Exchange with the generous support of lead sponsors, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust and JDRF. Major sponsors include the American Diabetes Association, Eli Lilly and Company and Lexicon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The quality of this years entries, and especially the finalists, is truly remarkable, said Jay Mohr, President and CEO of Dirigo Therapeutics and a member of the Board of T1D Exchange. We are excited to provide these innovators with Continue reading >>

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs in Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope According to recent research , we're not entirely sure how many diseases the label 'diabetes' covers. But no matter what causes our bodies to struggle with their blood sugar levels, it's a serious condition that requires daily care. Scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Insulin producing implants made from stem cells Clinical trials began last year for testing for ViaCyte's PEC-Direct device ; a credit-card sized implant containing insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells. Previous research had shown the implants could mature and function inside patients. Together with a cohort of volunteers who started testing in January, the new research should tell us soon whether the technology can help people with type-1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. A drug on the World Health Organisation's list of essential drugs could have another purpose ; blocking a molecule implemented in the autoimmune response that can give rise to type-1 diabetes. Called methyldopa, the compound already has an important job treating high blood pressure in pregnant women and children. It's left to be seen if it could help reduce the incidence of diabetes in some way, but the fact it's already being used - rather than being stuck in the lab Continue reading >>

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