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Diabetes Nausea

Nausea And Vomiting

Nausea And Vomiting

Tweet Most, if not all of us will be familiar with the feeling of nausea, which is basically the feeling of needing to be sick, felt in the stomach area. Both nausea and vomiting can be a sign of a number of underlying health conditions, including diabetes. When there is an issue that can affect the stomach or gastric system of their body, people can feel sick. Even if it is a fairly tenuous connection, such as angina affecting blood flow, the sufferer may still feel queasy. Causes of nausea Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can cause nausea or vomiting in several ways. Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia As the blood glucose levels rise and fall, the body's metabolism can get interrupted and confused which can lead to a mixed feeling of nausea. Low blood pressure (Hypotension) Low blood pressure often leads to dizzy spells which, for some people, can induce a feeling of nausea as the world appears to spin around them. Certain medications The side effect of a lot of drugs is a feeling of nausea, and even vomiting. Metformin, the most widely used diabetes drug, is known to have nauseating side effects. Gastroparesis Due to neuropathy, the body may not be able to move food from the stomach or along the intestines. This can cause a back log of food, which can result in sickness. Bezoars Bezoars are stone like formations created from undigested food matter, which can block the gastro-intestinal track and stop food processing and digesting. This can eventually cause nausea and vomiting. When to see your doctor If you are having recurrent or consistent bouts of nausea or vomiting, then it is a good idea to go and see your doctor to get the issue sorted as soon as possible. Keeping a diary of nausea or vomiting episodes and what you ate or were doing beforehand may help the Continue reading >>

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

When 'normal Teen' Stuff Is A Warning Sign Of Illness: What Parents Should Know

Editor's Note: This story was first published on August 15, 2016. Stacey Crescitelli is parenting her third teenager after successfully steering daughters Anna, 19, and Sophia, 18, to adulthood. So when her third child, Henry, now 14, began growing at at a fast pace, sleeping more and thinning out, she and her husband Joe thought he was just being a typical teen. As it turns out, his body was actually fighting something more sinister than teenage hormones: Type 1 diabetes. Now, Crescitelli wants other parents of teenagers to know about the symptoms of Type 1 diabetes. But how can parents tell the difference between what is normal and what is not when it comes to teens? Stacey Crescitelli Never miss a parenting story with TODAY’s newsletters! Sign up here Crescitelli, 46, noticed that since December, Henry had grown a lot, "maybe four or five inches," she told TODAY Parents, "and his body was changing. He has always been kind of a solid boy with a large frame — never one of those reed thin, gangly boys — but suddenly, he was becoming one," she said, "and of course, we thought he was simply 'leaning out,'" she said. Though Henry continued to lose weight and began to sleep more, it was not until this past March that the Doylestown, Pennsylvania, mother noticed symptoms that did not fit with what she believed was normal for teenage boys. That was when Henry suffered from a sudden bout of vertigo that "terrified him and mystified us," said Crescitelli. Related story: State legislator riles up 'army of fierce moms' with diabetes comment "One minute he was in the kitchen getting water, and the next he was asking me to help him to the couch because he couldn't walk or focus his eyes," she said. The vertigo lasted for a day, but it was the beginning of more new symptoms: f Continue reading >>

7w Pregnant And Here Comes The Nausea, How Do I Cope?

7w Pregnant And Here Comes The Nausea, How Do I Cope?

7w Pregnant and here comes the nausea, how do I cope? Im 7weeks along and have felt fantastic up until about a week ago when the nausea started creeping in. Im craving carbs, but not having a lot of success making them work without highs. Ive gotten the Psi bands for accupressure, and sipping on lemon water, but I feel best when Im eating something, like popcorn. As you know as Type 1, I cant be eating all day long and manage the right dosing. Or can I? Looking for suggestions on how you all got through quelling nausea without spiking BG. Besides the nausea, Im so excited to be pregnant and up for the challenge!! Congrats on your pregnancy! Im 10-weeks along and eating has been a bit of a challenge for me as well, since I was just placed on insulin. Have you met with your endocrinologist and dietician since pregnancy? They may offer suggestions on what and how to eat, or change medication too. Congrats to you too! Sorry to hear you have the added fun of life on insulin, but its totally doable. Yes, I have a stellar Endo whom I email records to twice weekly for suggestions and adjustments. Ive found that lemon water and chewing on ginger is helpful w nausea. Also taking a naps (new to me!) My nausea kinda comes and goes, so eating my known meals when feeling good is easier. Balancing food/insulin is easier when you know how a meal is going to act / how much to dose. However boring, eating the same few meals over and over reduces a big variable and improves control. Another big thing is the pre bolus (waiting to eat 15-20 min after giving insulin). Good luck and stay in touch! Would having a bowl of cut-up low/no carb veggies pieces in the fridge work? Not the same as popcorn but would it be close enough? So perhaps you could just reach in and grab a couple slices of cuc Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes is a major health problem in America today. Normally, sugars and starches (carbohydrates) are metabolized for use by the body by the chemical insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. If the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, the carbohydrates cannot be used and the level increases in the blood. The carbohydrate that is tested and found in the blood is glucose. Excess glucose in the blood leads to the diagnosis of diabetes. If diabetes is not adequately controlled by diet or insulin injections, complications can occur, such as increases in infections and damage to blood vessels. GESTATIONAL DIABETES When a woman is pregnant, she must share her carbohydrates with the growing baby. The pregnancy hormones can interfere with the ability of the mother's insulin to regulate carbohydrates. In a small percentage of pregnant women (3-12%), the insulin response is very reduced and the blood glucose levels become abnormally high, causing gestational diabetes (diabetes in pregnancy). For the mother, this can mean increased risk of infections or increased chance of a Cesarean section delivery. Following delivery of the baby, the mother's system returns to normal. In addition to problems for the mother, her baby may also suffer from diabetes. Depending upon the blood levels of glucose during the pregnancy, the baby may grow excessively large, causing difficulties at delivery. Additionally, the baby may have temporary difficulty controlling its glucose and calcium at birth. If the mother's blood sugar remains elevated throughout her pregnancy, the baby has increased risk of stillbirth. DETECTING GESTATIONAL DIABETES Gestational diabetes is most often encountered in late pregnancy. In the past, screening for this disease was based on clues such as a family history o Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

The symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop very quickly (over a few days or weeks), particularly in children. In older adults, the symptoms can often take longer to develop (a few months). However, they should disappear when you start taking insulin and the condition is under control. The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itchiness around the genital area, or regular bouts of thrush (a yeast infection) blurred vision caused by the lens of your eye changing shape slow healing of cuts and grazes Vomiting or heavy, deep breathing can also occur at a later stage. This is a dangerous sign and requires immediate admission to hospital for treatment. See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. When to seek urgent medical attention You should seek urgent medical attention if you have diabetes and develop: a loss of appetite nausea or vomiting a high temperature stomach pain fruity smelling breath – which may smell like pear drops or nail varnish (others will usually be able to smell it, but you won't) Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose levels can become very low. This is known as hypoglycaemia (or a "hypo"), and it's triggered when injected insulin in your body moves too much glucose out of your bloodstream. In most cases, hypoglycaemia occurs as a result of taking too much insulin, although it can also develop if you skip a meal, exercise very vigorously or drink alcohol on an empty stomach. Symptoms of a "hypo" include: feeling shaky and irritable sweating tingling lips feeling weak feeling confused hunger nausea (feeling sick) A hypo can be brought under control simply by eating or drinking somethin Continue reading >>

Early Assessment Of Cost-effectiveness Of Gastric Electrical Stimulation For Diabetic Nausea And Vomiting

Early Assessment Of Cost-effectiveness Of Gastric Electrical Stimulation For Diabetic Nausea And Vomiting

Early Assessment of Cost-effectiveness of Gastric Electrical Stimulation for Diabetic Nausea and Vomiting. 1. Department of Abdominal Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. 2. Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. 3. Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. 4. Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, 01 Oct 2017, 23(4):541-549 DOI: 10.5056/jnm16179 PMID: 28478663PMCID: PMC5628986 Share this article Share with emailShare with twitterShare with linkedinShare with facebook Recurrent nausea and/or vomiting are common complications of diabetes mellitus. The conditions severely impact the quality of life of patients and often cause repeated admissions to hospital incurring significant healthcare costs. If standard treatment fails, gastric electrical stimulation (GES) may be offered in selected cases, as a minimally invasive, but expensive, therapeutic option. Our aims are to evaluate the clinical effect and the cost-utility of GES as a treatment for severe diabetic recurrent nausea and/or vomiting.Among 33 diabetes patients implanted with GES because of recurrent nausea and/or vomiting, 30 were available for evaluation. The effect of treatment was assessed prospectively using symptom-diaries and the SF-36 questionnaires at baseline, after 6 and 12 months, and thereafter yearly. The number of days in hospital due to symptoms related to gastrointestinal dysfunction was calculated using hospital records 12 months prior to and 12 months after implantation.The surgical procedures were performed without mortality or major complications. Six months after surgery 78% of the r Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Additional information on Diabetes Monitoring Approximately 3.5 million people in the UK have been diagnosed as diabetic, around 10% of whom have Type 1 diabetes. There is no conclusive proof that those travelling with diabetes are more likely to become unwell during travel than those without diabetes. However, a change in diet, activity levels and environment (temperature, altitude) during travel can all affect blood glucose levels and represent a challenge to maintaining good health. Many people with diabetes need to travel with medication and/or medical devices and be able to access medical attention when needed. Careful pre-travel education and preparation should allow travellers with diabetes to enjoy a rewarding and pleasurable trip. Preparing for Travel Ideally you should start planning your trip well in advance (i.e. 8 weeks) of your departure date. Dedicated diabetes websites (see Useful Contacts) offer excellent advice and Travel Check Lists and Travel Guides are available online. Alongside accessing information on vaccination and prevention of travel-related illness you also need to consider: Travelling with a chronic medical condition. Maintaining health and glucose control during travel. Effects of temperature and altitude. Not all people with diabetes require medication, or are on insulin, therefore some advice (where stated) will not apply to everyone. Travelling with a Chronic Medical Condition Before embarking on travel, you should ensure that your health is optimized and can be maintained throughout your trip. You should consider: Pretravel Medical Check-up A routine checkup with your Diabetic Consultant, Diabetic Nurse Specialist or General Practitioner pre-travel will include assessment of: Glucose control If you are crossing time zones, alteration o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus, Epigastric Mass, Nausea: Causes & Reasons - Symptoma

Diabetes Mellitus, Epigastric Mass, Nausea: Causes & Reasons - Symptoma

Somatostatinomas Somatostatinomas are extremely rare neoplasms and are often associated with diabetes mellitus, gall stones and steatorrhea. [pancreaticcancer.net.au] This can cause nausea, vomiting, and pain that tend to be worse after eating. [cancer.org] We report a 23-year-old female who presented with upper abdominal pain of long duration and epigastric mass on palpation. [ijpmonline.org] A partial pancreaticogastrodudenectomy was performed on a 66-year old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus because of an invasive, moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] A 63-year-old woman presented to the hospital with persistent nausea, dyspepsia and weight loss for 6 months. [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] A considerable number of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are simultaneously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and nearly half of them exhibit decreased glucose tolerance [symptoma.com] mellitus. [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Symptoms Abdominal mass Abdominal pain Chills Fever Inability to eat Nausea and vomiting Signs and tests Patients with pancreatic abscesses usually have had pancreatitis. [coordinatedhealth.com] On admission, an elastic hard mass with tenderness was palpable in the epigastric region. [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] AIMS: To explore the association of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP). [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] PATIENT CONCERNS: A 42-year-old male patient was referred to our institution after experiencing right upper abdominal distention without abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Abdominal examination showed irregular mass present in the epigastric and right hypochondrial region which moves with respiration and continuous with liver border. [ijmpo.org] mellitus excessive alcohol consumpt Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis doesn’t sound good, and it isn’t. Literally “stomach paralysis,” it is a form of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, that is a common complication of diabetes. The damaged nerve in question is the vagus nerve, named for its vagabond-like wandering nature. The vagus nerve meanders all the way from the brainstem to the colon, controlling heart rate, sweating, gastrointestinal contractions, and various other involuntary, automatic functions on its way. In the case of gastroparesis, it’s the vagus nerve’s control of stomach contractions that’s damaged. The stomach is basically a hollow ball made of muscle that serves as a storage container and mixing bowl for food. It’s about the size of a small melon, but it can stretch to hold nearly a gallon if you really press the issue. In healthy people, wave-like contractions of the stomach, prompted by the vagus nerve, crush and churn your food into small particles and mix it up with enzymes and acids produced by the stomach’s inner lining. Then the stomach contractions, coming along in waves at about three per minute, slowly and evenly propel the pulverized food out through the pyloric valve, which opens just enough to release an eighth of an ounce of food at a time. From there it’s down the small intestine, where the real nutrient absorption occurs. It can take four hours to empty your stomach into your small intestine, especially if you’ve eaten fat, which slows the process down. If the vagus nerve has been damaged by years of high blood sugars, the process hits a snag. The walls of the stomach, paralyzed by the lack of vagus nerve stimulation, don’t make their muscular wave-like contractions. As a result, food just sticks around in the stomach, unpulverized and going nowhere. It may sit an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Common symptoms of low blood sugar are: Feeling dizzy, shaky, or lightheaded Feeling nervous or anxious Having a fast heart beat Sweating Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Warning Signs

Symptoms Of Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Warning Signs

Ketosis or nutritional ketosis is a perfectly healthy metabolic process in which the body burns stored fats for energy when it doesn’t have adequate glucose. Mild ketosis may help you lose weight and even be therapeutic. Unfortunately, there’s another less desirable condition that’s easily confused with ketosis – and that’s diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This is a high blood sugar-related emergency that accounts for over 100,000 hospital admissions every single year in the United States alone.1 DKA strikes those with diabetes and, if left unchecked, could even put you in a coma. Understanding ketosis and DKA and knowing how they’re different could save your life if you’re diabetic. Mild Ketosis Has Therapeutic Benefits People on diets like the ketogenic diet or Atkins diet cut down carb intake and switch to a diet that’s high in protein and fat instead. This sets your body up for ketosis, which is intended to help with weight loss. Some studies have even found that ketosis can help lower levels of blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, besides bringing down body weight and body mass index.2 Mild ketosis has also been explored for its therapeutic applications in diseases associated with free radical damage, hypoxia (oxygen deficiency in tissues), and insulin resistance.3 But There Are Still Some Side Effects Of Ketosis When you are on a low-carb diet or haven’t eaten for a long time, the body undergoes ketosis and you may experience some side effects.4 These are usually temporary and occur initially when your body is adjusting to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. Some compare these ketosis symptoms to those you’d experience when you are coming down with flu, giving rise to the term “ketosis flu” or just “ket Continue reading >>

Nausea And Vomiting In The Diabetic Patient.

Nausea And Vomiting In The Diabetic Patient.

Abstract The nausea and vomiting that can complicate advanced diabetes is often attributed to impaired gastric motility. Not all patients with diabetic gastropathy show marked abnormality on gastric emptying studies, however. The mechanism remains uncertain, although cases complicated by a bezoar may respond to its removal. Prokinetic drugs may bring a measure of relief, albeit often temporary. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

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