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Diabetes Myths And Misconceptions

9 Diabetes Myths To Ignore | Reader's Digest

9 Diabetes Myths To Ignore | Reader's Digest

Misconceptions about diabetes risk factors, symptoms, healthy foods, and more could affect how diabetes patients take care of themselves. Here, experts shed light on the truth behind some common diabetes myths. Fact: Eating sugar doesn't cause diabetes in the same smoking-gun way that cigarettes cause cancer, notes Prevention.com , but sugar seems to play an indirect role and it's just plain common sense to limit your intake. For one thing, eating too much sugar can lead to obesity, which is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, says David G. Marrero, PhD, president of Health Care & Education at the American Diabetes Association. But beyond that association, recent research suggests that sugary drinks can increase diabetes risk, even after accounting for weight. A 2015 BMJ study found that consuming one sugar-sweetened drink a day raises type 2 diabetes risk by 18 percent. And a JAMA study found that the risk of diabetes in women almost doubled when they went from drinking from 1 or fewer sugary drinks a week to 1 or more per day over a four-year period. These rapidly absorbed sugars may damage cells in the pancreas that secrete insulin, according to Prevention.com. Sugar is hidden in countless packaged foods, so you're probably consuming more than you think. Look at nutrition labels and avoid highly processed foods. The World Health Organization recommends sticking to no more than six teaspoons (or 24 grams) a day for the average adult. Start these healthy habits to help prevent diabetes . Myth: Thin people don't get type 2 diabetes Fact: While some 85 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, that means 15 percent of people with diabetes are at a healthy weight, according to a recent article in Harvard Health Publications . In fact, a 2012 study in Continue reading >>

7 Myths About Diabetes - Facts And Misconceptions About Diabetes

7 Myths About Diabetes - Facts And Misconceptions About Diabetes

MYTH: Overweight people always develop diabetes. One important clarification: Type 1 and type 2 diabetes both involve insulin, but they're different diseases. Type 1 means your body doesn't produce insulin, and type 2 means your body no longer uses it effectively.Most patients with type 2 diabetes are obese, but only about one third of obese people have diagnosed diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control . For type 1 diabetes, this is true low blood sugar can be life-threatening. But for type 2, it varies based on the medications you're taking, says Jaclyn London, M.S., R.D., C.D.N. , Nutrition Director at the Good Housekeeping Institute . Regardless, the key to diabetes management is never going too long without a little something, so a shelf-stable snack that's about 15 grams of carbs can come in handy. Type 2 was once called "adult-onset diabetes" and, indeed, doctors diagnose adults between 45 and 64 the most. But over 5,000 children develop type 2 diabetes every year, according to the American Diabetes Association . In fact, type 2 is now found in kids as young as 3yearsold. MYTH: Diabetes treatment is all medicine and diet. Yes, they're importantbut so is exercise . Regularly getting up and moving even if it's just walking more frequently can help with insulin sensitivity, Londonsays. Your ultimate goal: 10,000steps per day,which sounds like a lot but adds up quickly if you make a point of moving throughout the day. MYTH: Type 2 results from eating too much sugar. Diet is a major factor in type 2 diabetes ,butgenetics, smoking and lack of exercisemay play a role as well. If you're concerned about developing the disease, London advises asking yourphysician to draw what's called afasting blood glucose, plus an HbA1C and abiomarker thatindicates your av Continue reading >>

Ten Common Myths About Diabetes

Ten Common Myths About Diabetes

Here are ten of the most well-known misconceptions about diabetes and the facts to dispell them. Misconception 1: Overeating Sugar Causes Diabetes What makes diabetes happen? The reasons are certainly not totally understood. What's known is that simply overeating sugar isn't likely to cause diabetes. Instead, diabetes begins when something disrupts your capacity to turn foods into energy. To know what goes on when you've got diabetes, keep these things in your mind: Your system reduces a lot of foods into glucose, a sort of sugar necessary to power your cells. A hormone called insulin is created inside the pancreas. Insulin helps cells in your body use glucose for fuel. Listed below are the most typical forms of diabetes and what researchers know about: Type 1 diabetes happens when the pancreas cannot make insulin. Type 2 diabetes takes place when the pancreas won't make enough insulin, the insulin doesn't work properly, or both. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy in certain women. Misconception 2: You Will Find a Lot of Rules Inside a Diabetes Diet When you have diabetes, you need to plan your diet. However the general principal is not hard: Following a "diabetes diet" means choosing food that may work with your activities and any medications to help keep your glucose levels as near to normalcy as it can be. Misconception 3: Carbohydrates Could Be Unhealthy for Diabetes Actually, carbohydrates are great for diabetes. They make up the foundation of a normal diabetes diet. Carbohydrates possess the greatest impact on blood sugar, and that's why you are required to observe the number of carbohydrates you take in when following a diabetes diet. Misconception 4: Protein Is Preferable to Carbohydrates for Diabetes The major problem is always that many foods abundant w Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths And Misconceptions

Diabetes Myths And Misconceptions

Dispelling common myths and misconceptions When theyre first diagnosed with diabetes , says Meredith Cotton, RN, a Kaiser Permanente Washington diabetes educator, many patients have a number of misconceptions about the disease, including these: 1. Some foodswillbe off-limits forever. Its true that most people will need to make changes in their diet to manage their diabetes, says Cotton. But that doesnt mean that you wont ever be able to eat the foods that you love. For example, if chocolate cake is a favorite food, you may need to eat a smaller portion and only enjoy it occasionally. And on the day you decide to have cake, you may need to eat less of other foods that contain sugar and carbohydrates. Its a matter of finding the right balance of daily nutrients to meet your bodys needs, Cotton says. 2. I wont be able to regulate my blood sugar. Patients who are newly diagnosed will need to spend some time studying the impact of various foods and exercise on their blood sugar, Cotton says. Blood sugar testing is one of the most effective tools for helping patients see the what happens when principle in action. What happens when I eat three pieces of pizza instead of two? What happens when I go too long without eating and Im really famished at dinner? What happens when I go for a brisk walk after dinner? By testing their blood sugar, they can get some really useful feedback, says Cotton. And a diabetes educator can help them figure out how to do this problem-solving. Diabetes is a genetic problem that you inherit from your relatives, says Cotton. While environment and lifestyle choices might make the disease show up a little earlier, people dont get diabetes if they dont have the genes for it, she says. But feeling guilty and blaming yourself is part of the emotional respo Continue reading >>

5 Diabetes Myths And Misconceptions: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

5 Diabetes Myths And Misconceptions: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

Did you know there are an estimated 1.3 million adults living with undiagnosed diabetes in South Africa? In fact, 50% of people with type 2 diabetes dont know they have it. Get your stats and facts straight here. The number of people with type 2 diabetes is increasing in every country, and the World Health Organization predicts that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death worldwide in 2030. As chances are pretty high that you know someone who is pre-diabetic or who already suffers from the condition, clue yourself up by making sure your knowledge on the subject is accurate. Here are five common, but incorrect, ideas about diabetes: A common myth about diabetes is that type 1 is the "bad" kind of diabetes and that type 2 is the less serious or "good" kind. It's not clear where this idea started, but it could be our fear of needles. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin injections to control their blood sugar while people with type 2 diabetes can usually control their blood sugar with oral medicine and lifestyle changes, or even by lifestyle changes alone. However, some people with type 2 diabetes also have to inject themselves with insulin as diabetes can worsen over time. Both types of diabetes can lead to serious health complications, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage that can result in having to amputate limbs. Being overweight is a major risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Being even slightly overweight increases diabetes risk by up to five times, according to research done by Harvard School of Public Health Professor Walter Willett, and being seriously obese increases it 60 times. But being overweight is not the only major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Genetics are just as important. People with a f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths

Diabetes Myths

Tweet There are a number of myths about diabetes that are all too commonly reported as facts. These misrepresentations of diabetes can sometimes be harmful and lead to an unfair stigma around the condition. Diabetes information is widely available, both from healthcare professionals and the Internet, but not all of it is true. It can be hard to know what is accurate, so this page aims to highlight the top ten of the most common diabetes myths. As well as diabetes myths, you may be interested in these diabetes facts. Myth 1: People with diabetes can’t eat sugar This is one of the most common diabetes myths; that people with the condition have to eat a sugar-free diet. People with diabetes need to eat a diet that is balanced, which can include some sugar in moderation. People with diabetes can eat sugar. Myth 2: Type 2 diabetes is mild This diabetes myth is widely repeated, but of course it isn’t true. No form of diabetes is mild. If type 2 diabetes is poorly managed it can lead to serious (even life-threatening) complications. Good control of diabetes can significantly decrease the risk of complications but this doesn’t mean the condition itself is not serious. Myth 3: Type 2 diabetes only affects fat people Whilst type 2 diabetes is often associated with being overweight and obese by the media, it is patently untrue that type 2 diabetes only affects overweight people. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a normal weight, or underweight. Myth 4: People with diabetes should only eat diabetic food Diabetic food is one of the most common myths of the last ten years. The label ‘diabetic’ is often used on sweets foods. Often sugar alcohols, or other sweeteners, will be used instead of sugar. Diabetic food will often still affect blood glucose levels, is Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Myths: Clear Up Common Mix-ups

Type 1 Diabetes Myths: Clear Up Common Mix-ups

Type 1 Diabetes: Are You as Smart as a 2nd Grader? All you really need to know about type 1 diabetes Eric Hamblin likely learned in kindergarten. This 8-year-old was diagnosed at 18 months of age, and he already has enough smarts to teach first-year med students a thing or two about the disease. I just want to say one thing, and thats you guys dont know anything about diabetes, the class clown told a capacity crowd at a University of New England Medical School seminar. His line got the laughs he was after, but theres truth behind it. Of an estimated 29 million Americans with diabetes , about 3 million have Eric's form of the disease. The smaller proportion of people with type 1 may be a big reason the condition so misunderstood. Types 1 and 2 both cause high blood sugar and have insulin as the problem. Insulin is a hormone that unlocks cells to let in blood sugar, and that creates energy. You cant live without insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body doesnt make enough of it. If you have type 2, your body cant use it properly. There are many other differences between the conditions. Erics mom, Elizabeth Pratt Hamblin, knew the basics thanks to her job as a medical editor. But I didnt know what having type 1 really meant or how it was treated until he was diagnosed, she says. What began as an overwhelmed mothers quest to learn how to care for her son turned into a self-help book for others: 100 Questions & Answers About Your Childs Type 1 Diabetes. Pratt Hamblin covers many myths about type 1 diabetes in her book, including that it only affects children. Thats not true, although it doesnt help that the condition used to be called juvenile or juvenile-onset diabetes. About 18,000 kids a year are diagnosed with the disease, but it can happen at any age. About 5% of Continue reading >>

8 Myths And Misconceptions About Diabetes

8 Myths And Misconceptions About Diabetes

8 Myths and Misconceptions About Diabetes A correct understanding of diabetes is conducive to the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Here are some myths and misconceptions about diabetes, which I hope can attract your attention. Many people have the misconception that high blood sugar means diabetes. In fact, diabetes is the primary reason for high blood sugar. For example, you are probably a diabetic if your fasting blood glucose level is equal to or higher than 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L), or your 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level is equal to or higher than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L). But there are some other reasons for high blood sugar. Normally, your blood sugar level will often change and rise especially after a meal. But it will naturally decline about 1 hour after the meal as the insulin produced in the pancreas promotes the absorption and consumption of glucose, and will basically return to the normal blood sugar level 2 hours after the meal. If your blood sugar level is repeatedly high, you are probably a diabetic, but still a test is needed. Don't relax your vigilance. 4. Diuretics, Aspirin, Oral contraceptives. Myth 2: Eating too much sugar will cause diabetes. Diabetes is not directly related to eating too much sugar. Eating too much sugar won't necessary cause diabetes, and eating less sugar won't necessary prevent you from diabetes. Genes, obesity, lack of exercise, high-calorie and high-fat diet, etc. are the main causes of diabetes. If you have a family member with diabetes, you should be sure to properly control the intake of sweets while avoiding obesity. Myth 3: Good control of blood sugar will protect you from diabetic complications. The blood sugar level is a measure of whether you have diabetes, but a normal blood sugar level does not mean every Continue reading >>

14 Biggest Myths About Type 2 Diabetes

14 Biggest Myths About Type 2 Diabetes

Close to 30 million Americans have diabetes, but misconceptions surround the disease. The truth about type 2 First, a primer on what type 2 diabetes is: blood glucose governs your body's energy, and under normal conditions, a complicated set of interactions move glucose from the blood into muscle cells as quickly as possible. In type 2 diabetes blood sugar (glucose) levels rise higher than normal because the body makes insulin—the key hormone for regulating blood sugar—but can't use it properly. Nearly 30 million Americans—a number that has doubled over the last two decades—have type 2 diabetes. Despite its prevalence, misinformation surrounds the disease, from what causes it to which foods are forbidden and even how to treat it. Here, experts reveal the biggest diabetes myths and set the record straight. Myth: Type 2 diabetes is not that serious Not everyone with type 2 diabetes needs insulin, so it may not seem that serious, says Sarfraz Zaidi, MD, endocrinologist at Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, Calif. "In reality it's a silent killer, also because those with type 2 don't have many symptoms," he says. In actuality, type 2 is more complex than type 1, says Dr. Zaidi, who describes type 2 diabetes as a manifestation of an underlying disease process called insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome. "This causes high blood pressure, heart disease, and contributes to the growth of cancer and gout," he says. Myth: Symptoms of type 2 diabetes are easy to spot Nearly 28% of people who have type 2 diabetes don't even realize it. While the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are very similar—increased urination and thirst, fatigue, blurred vision, among others—type 1 symptoms tend to have a dramatic and abrupt onset (usually in children and adolescents, b Continue reading >>

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

(Photo Credit: Josie Nicole) Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is one of the most misunderstood diseases, and it accounts for 5-10% of all diabetes cases. Not many people understand the complexity or severity unless personally affected by it. Much of the stigma surrounding diabetes is brought on by myths and misconceptions. But as the prevalence is increasing worldwide, it’s important to debunk many of these myths and share the facts about Type 1 Diabetes. MYTH: Type 1 Diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. There is no known cause but it’s believed that genes and environmental factors play a role. MYTH: People with Type 1 Diabetes can be cured with diet and exercise – FACT: There is no cure for Type 1 Diabetes (YET). Yes, diet and exercise is beneficial for anyone including those managing diabetes, but it can not treat nor reverse it. MYTH: Sugar is off limits with Type 1 Diabetes – FACT: People with Type 1 Diabetes are not limited to what they can eat. Insulin is administered to cover the carbs or sugar they eat. Too much sugar is bad for everyone, but moderation is key. Sugar is also needed and life-saving for diabetics with low blood sugar. MYTH: If it’s sugar-free then it’s okay for Type 1 Diabetics to go ahead and consume – FACT: Actually, many sugar-free foods are loaded with carbohydrates. In many cases where they have more carbohydrates than a product just made with pure sugar. It’s always important to check nutrition labels because product packaging can be deceiving. MYTH: You won’t get Type 1 Diabetes if you live a healthy and active lifestyle – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes is not caused by ones’ lifesty Continue reading >>

Popular Misconceptions Regarding The Diabetes Management: Where Should We Focus Our Attention?

Popular Misconceptions Regarding The Diabetes Management: Where Should We Focus Our Attention?

Popular Misconceptions Regarding the Diabetes Management: Where Should We Focus Our Attention? 5 Lecturer cum statistician, Department of Community Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry, India. 1 Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, 2 Pre-Final Year MBBS Student, Department of Community Medicine, 3 Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, 4 Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, 5 Lecturer cum statistician, Department of Community Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry, India. NAME, ADDRESS, E-MAIL ID OF THE CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Rajkumar Patil, Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry, India. Phone: 9894428081 E-mail: [email protected] Received 2012 Apr 24; Revisions requested 2012 Sep 22; Accepted 2012 Nov 24. Copyright 2013 Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Background: Diabetes mellitus is a universal health problem with a global prevalence of 1.3%. India is known as the Diabetes capital of the world as it harbours the largest number of diabetes patients. There is lack of awareness about the existing interventions for preventing diabetes and for the management of the complications. One of the barriers in the way of seeking health care advice is the misconception about the disease, which revolves around all the aspects of diabetes, which include its prevention, control and treatment. To determine the various misconceptions about the management of Diabetes mellitus in the study area. To find out the association of various misconceptions with the socio-demographic factors. Material and Methods: A cro Continue reading >>

5 Misconceptions About Diabetes

5 Misconceptions About Diabetes

Many people associate diabetes with high blood sugar levels, taking insulin injections, and not being able to eat sweets. But the fact is that there are different types of diabetes and they affect people in different ways. So without beating around the bush any further, lets take a look at the different types of diabetes, what causes them, and what does not cause them. Here are 5 common misconceptions about diabetes and why they arent quite true Type 1 diabetes results from the body not producing enough insulin, a hormone the body needs to convert starches, sugar and other foods into energy. When you suffer from this condition, your pancreas can no longer produce insulin. So injections of insulin through a pen or pump are needed to help keep the blood sugar levels in check. Type 1 diabetes is usually discovered early in children. Nearly 90 percent of these cases dont have any associated family history with it. Unfortunately, researchers havent discovered how to prevent Type 1 diabetes. We do know, however, that it is not caused by how much sugar a person eats. Many parents blame themselves when their kid gets diagnosed with the disease, but the truth is, a person cannot eat his or her way to this type of diabetes. Though eating sugary cereals or drinking sweetened soft drinks is not the healthiest option for anyone, the bottom line is, consuming sugar is not the reason for Type 1 diabetes. Note: When people with type 1 diabetes take the Manna Blood Sugar Support supplement in conjunction with their insulin, they might need to reduce the amount of insulin injected. Talk to your healthcare provider before making adjustments to insulin dosage. This is not entirely true, but staying away from sugar as far as possible is recommended. In contrast to Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 o Continue reading >>

Myths And Misconceptions: Who Gets Diabetes And How It Can Affect You

Myths And Misconceptions: Who Gets Diabetes And How It Can Affect You

Learn more about the complications of diabetes . The information above shows that diabetes is indeed a serious disease. However, the good news is that if you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes and get serious about controlling your blood glucose and making healthy lifestyle changes, you can prevent or delay many of the complications associated with diabetes. For instance, results from a large US National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) study conducted at centers throughout the country over a period of 3 years, including over 3,000 individuals with prediabetes showed the power of lifestyle changes in reducing risk of progression to type 2 diabetes.2 In the study, participants were randomly assigned to different interventions, including an intensive program of lifestyle modification (a healthy diet, regular physical activity, and behavior modification) or drug therapy with the diabetes drug metformin and information on diet and physical activity. Both groups reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but the group that received lifestyle modification had the most dramatic reduction in risk. For participants in this group, a weight reduction of 5% to 7% (this translates to a loss of about 10-14 lbs in a person who weighs 200 lbs) reduced the risk of being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by almost 60%.2 This demonstrates the huge potential for lifestyle changes in reducing diabetes risk. And those lifestyle changes dont necessarily have to be extreme. To get their exercise, most participants in the DPP study were not running marathons, but walking regularly (at least 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week). Myth 2: People with diabetes are more likely to get colds or the flu FACT:If you have diabetes, your chances of getting a cold or Continue reading >>

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

While close to 10 percent of Americans have diabetes, there’s a lot of misinformation about the disease. This is especially the case for type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. Here are nine myths about type 2 diabetes — and the facts that debunk them. 1. Diabetes isn’t a serious disease. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease. In fact, two out of three people with diabetes will die from cardiovascular-related episodes, such as a heart attack or stroke. However, diabetes can be controlled with proper medications and lifestyle changes. 2. If you’re overweight, you’ll automatically get type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is a serious risk factor, but there are other factors that put you at an increased risk. Having a family history of diabetes, having high blood pressure, or being sedentary are just some of these other factors. 3. Exercising when you have diabetes only increases your chances of experiencing low blood sugar. Don’t think that just because you have diabetes you can skip out on your workout! Exercise is crucial to controlling diabetes. If you’re on insulin, or a medication that increases insulin production in the body, you have to balance exercise with your medication and diet. Talk to your doctor about creating an exercise program that’s right for you and your body. 4. Insulin will harm you. Insulin is a lifesaver, but it’s also difficult to manage for some people. New and improved insulin allows for much tighter blood sugar control with lower risk of low or high blood sugar. Testing your blood sugar levels, however, is the only way to know how your treatment plan is working for you. 5. Having diabetes means your body isn’t producing enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes typically have enough insulin when they’re Continue reading >>

Myths & Facts

Myths & Facts

There are many myths about diabetes which can make separating fact from fiction difficult. To cut through the confusion, we’ve broken down some of the common misconceptions: Fact - There is no such thing as “mild” diabetes. All types of diabetes are serious and can lead to complications if not well managed. Diabetes can affect quality of life and can reduce life expectancy. Fact - There are a number of types of diabetes. The most common are type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes Other forms of diabetes are less common. Each type of diabetes has different causes and may be managed in different ways but once someone has any type of diabetes except gestational diabetes, it needs to be managed every day. Gestational diabetes goes away after pregnancy, however it does significantly increase someone's risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. All types of diabetes are complex and serious. Fact - Not all types of diabetes can be prevented. Type 1 is an autoimmune condition, it cannot be prevented and there is no cure. The cause of type 1 diabetes is still unknown. Strong international evidence shows diabetes prevention programs can help prevent type 2 diabetes in up to 58 per cent of cases. There is no single cause of type 2 diabetes, but there are well-established risk factors. Your risk of developing diabetes is also affected by things you cannot change such as family history and ethnicity. Fact - Being overweight or obese is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes but it is not a direct cause. Some people who are overweight may not develop type 2 diabetes while some people who are of a healthy weight will develop type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is not preventable and not associated with weight, physical inactivity or any other lifestyle factors. Fact - The onset o Continue reading >>

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