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Diabetes Myths American Diabetes Association

Dispelling Diabetes Myths

Dispelling Diabetes Myths

Whats true and whats false regarding this disease? Nearly 24 million Americans live with diabetes, notes Donna L. Henshue, RN, Morningstars Coordinator of Residential Health & Wellness. But a great many misconceptions persist about the disease. Here, well distinguish between whats rumored and whats real. Myth: You cant prevent Type II diabetes. Fact: False: Even if one or more of your relative have diabetes and you may be more susceptible than most, you can indeed prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. In fact, losing just 5% to 7% of your body weight can reduce your risk. Tip: Make healthy eating choices, and resolve to exercise 30 minutes on five occasions throughout each week. Myth: Eating too many sugary foods can cause diabetes. Fact: True, sort of. While sugar is often seen as the bad guy, its not the only one. If other unhealthy foods such as ice cream, pastries, chips, and greasy burgers are too much of your diet, youre increasing the risk of gaining weight and developing diabetes. Tip: As with most things, moderation in any dietary intake is often key. Myth: If you have diabetes, you should stick with diabetic or dietetic versions of foods. Fact: False. The American Diabetes Association says that these foods offer no special benefit and may still raise blood sugar levels. Whats more, many have a laxative effect. Tip: Dont fall into the habit of eating all-that-you-want portions or servings of fat-free or sugar-free foods; they are not calorie-free! Myth: People with diabetes are more susceptible to other illnesses. Fact: False. People with diabetes are not any more likely to get sick than others, but you should take precautions since infections interfere with blood sugar management. Tip: To help stay healthy, get an annual flu shot and wash your hands frequen Continue reading >>

9 Diabetes Myths To Ignore | Reader's Digest

9 Diabetes Myths To Ignore | Reader's Digest

Misconceptions about diabetes risk factors, symptoms, healthy foods, and more could affect how diabetes patients take care of themselves. Here, experts shed light on the truth behind some common diabetes myths. Fact: Eating sugar doesn't cause diabetes in the same smoking-gun way that cigarettes cause cancer, notes Prevention.com , but sugar seems to play an indirect role and it's just plain common sense to limit your intake. For one thing, eating too much sugar can lead to obesity, which is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, says David G. Marrero, PhD, president of Health Care & Education at the American Diabetes Association. But beyond that association, recent research suggests that sugary drinks can increase diabetes risk, even after accounting for weight. A 2015 BMJ study found that consuming one sugar-sweetened drink a day raises type 2 diabetes risk by 18 percent. And a JAMA study found that the risk of diabetes in women almost doubled when they went from drinking from 1 or fewer sugary drinks a week to 1 or more per day over a four-year period. These rapidly absorbed sugars may damage cells in the pancreas that secrete insulin, according to Prevention.com. Sugar is hidden in countless packaged foods, so you're probably consuming more than you think. Look at nutrition labels and avoid highly processed foods. The World Health Organization recommends sticking to no more than six teaspoons (or 24 grams) a day for the average adult. Start these healthy habits to help prevent diabetes . Myth: Thin people don't get type 2 diabetes Fact: While some 85 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, that means 15 percent of people with diabetes are at a healthy weight, according to a recent article in Harvard Health Publications . In fact, a 2012 study in Continue reading >>

14 Biggest Myths About Type 2 Diabetes

14 Biggest Myths About Type 2 Diabetes

Close to 30 million Americans have diabetes, but misconceptions surround the disease. The truth about type 2 First, a primer on what type 2 diabetes is: blood glucose governs your body's energy, and under normal conditions, a complicated set of interactions move glucose from the blood into muscle cells as quickly as possible. In type 2 diabetes blood sugar (glucose) levels rise higher than normal because the body makes insulin—the key hormone for regulating blood sugar—but can't use it properly. Nearly 30 million Americans—a number that has doubled over the last two decades—have type 2 diabetes. Despite its prevalence, misinformation surrounds the disease, from what causes it to which foods are forbidden and even how to treat it. Here, experts reveal the biggest diabetes myths and set the record straight. Myth: Type 2 diabetes is not that serious Not everyone with type 2 diabetes needs insulin, so it may not seem that serious, says Sarfraz Zaidi, MD, endocrinologist at Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, Calif. "In reality it's a silent killer, also because those with type 2 don't have many symptoms," he says. In actuality, type 2 is more complex than type 1, says Dr. Zaidi, who describes type 2 diabetes as a manifestation of an underlying disease process called insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome. "This causes high blood pressure, heart disease, and contributes to the growth of cancer and gout," he says. Myth: Symptoms of type 2 diabetes are easy to spot Nearly 28% of people who have type 2 diabetes don't even realize it. While the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are very similar—increased urination and thirst, fatigue, blurred vision, among others—type 1 symptoms tend to have a dramatic and abrupt onset (usually in children and adolescents, b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Facts And Glossary

Diabetes Facts And Glossary

Millions of Americans have diabetes, and there are many misconceptions about the disease. Weve put together some common myths about diabetes, and shared with you some facts to help you learn more about it. And, be sure to check out our glossary of terms below for more information on diabetes. Myth: There is only one kind of diabetes. Fact: There are three kinds of diabetes: type 1 , type 2 and gestational . Often when the term diabetes is used, people are referring to type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease. Myth: If diabetes doesnt run in my family I probably wont get it. Fact: It is true that if diabetes runs in your family you are more likely to get it; however, it is a misconception that you are safe otherwise. According to the American Diabetes Association, type 1 andtype 2 diabeteshave different causes, yet two factors are important in both: a person inherits a predisposition to diabetes, and then something in their environment triggers it. That is why more and more Americans are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which can be triggered by poor diet and lack of exercise. Myth: Diabetes isnt that serious of a disease. Fact: Having diabetes is not a death sentence and it is manageable with proper treatment; however, diabetes is among the top 10 causes of deaths in America, and treatment of it should be taken seriously when a person is diagnosed with any type of diabetes. Myth: Only people who are overweight should be concerned about diabetes Fact: Being slender helps to reduce your chances of getting type 2 diabetes, but a slender person can also have an insulin deficiency that causes type 2 diabetes, or can develop type 1 diabetes. Myth: Only adults can get type 2 diabetes. Fact: This myth is far from true. Recently more children are being Continue reading >>

Myths And Facts: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Myths And Facts: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Having diabetes nearly doubles your chance of having a heart attack. The good news is that good diabetes control can reduce your risks for diabetes complications. Diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger its onset; type 2 is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight increases your risk for developing type 2, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that sugary drinks are linked to type 2 diabetes. Learn more . People with diabetes are more likely to get colds and other illnesses. You are no more likely to get sick if you have diabetes. However, an illness can make your diabetes more difficult to control. Learn more . People with type 1 diabetes can't participate in sports or exercise. They can be tennis players, mountain climbers, weight lifters, basketball stars, snowboarders the sky's the limit! Women with diabetes shouldn't get pregnant. Women who manage their diabetes well can have a normal pregnancy and give birth to a healthy baby. Learn more . People with diabetes can feel when their blood glucose level goes too low. Not always. Some people cannot feel or recognize the symptoms of low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, which can be dangerous. Learn more . It's possible to have "just a touch" or "a little" diabetes. There is no such thing. Everyone who has diabetes runs the risk of serious complications. Learn more . You have to lose a lot of weight for your diabetes to improve. Losing just 7% of your body weight can offer significant health benefitsabout 15 pounds if you weigh 200. Learn more . Diabetes doesn't run in my family, so I'm safe. Family histo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Not everything you hear about diabetes is true. That’s why it is important to get the facts, so you can make good decisions to better manage your diabetes. Myth: "Diabetes is not that big of a deal." Fact: Diabetes is a big deal, but if you manage it right, you may be able to help delay or even avoid some diabetes-related health complications down the road. Myth: "People who are overweight eventually get diabetes." Fact: Being overweight is just one risk factor for developing diabetes. There are other factors, such as family history, race or ethnicity, and age. By knowing all of the risk factors, you may better understand your overall risk and what you can do to improve your health. Myth: "Eating too much sugar can cause type 2 diabetes." Fact: As mentioned above, weight gain is one risk factor for getting diabetes. Taking in too many calories causes an increase in weight. Drinking sugary drinks is one way to take in extra calories. The American Diabetes Association recommends not drinking a lot of sugary drinks. Sugar-sweetened drinks include: Regular (non-diet) sodas Fruit drinks including fruit punch Energy drinks Sports drinks Sweetened tea Instead, choose from zero or low-calorie drinks like water, unsweetened tea, coffee, or diet soda. A splash of lemon can also make your drink light and refreshing without the added calories. One 12-ounce can of regular (non-diet) soda contains approximately 150 calories and 40 grams of carbohydrates. Did you know that this is the same amount of carbohydrates in 10 teaspoons of sugar? Myth: "Having diabetes always leads to bad health problems." Fact: If you follow your diabetes care plan, you may be able to delay or prevent diabetes-related health problems. Myth: "It’s your own fault that you have diabetes." Fact: Diabetes isn Continue reading >>

Insulin Myths And Facts

Insulin Myths And Facts

If you have type 2 diabetes and your A1C is slowly creeping up despite your best efforts, insulin may be the next step in treating your diabetes. Many people struggle with the thought of insulin because of what they have heard about it. Some common myths about insulin and facts that may help you overcome your fears are listed below. Myth: Insulin means I am a failure. Fact: Needing insulin does not mean that you have failed to manage you diabetes well. Because type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, eventually your pancreas is just not able to keep up with your body's need for insulin—no matter what you've done to manage your diabetes. When other medicines no longer keep your blood glucose on target, insulin is often the next logical step for treating diabetes. Myth: Insulin does not work. Fact: Although many people think of diabetes as a “sugar” problem, actually diabetes is an insulin problem. The insulins used today are very similar to the insulin that the body naturally makes. In fact, insulin is the best way to lower your blood glucose. Myth: Insulin causes complications or death. Fact: The belief that insulin causes complications or death often comes from seeing what happened in the past to family members or friends with diabetes. Although it can be hard to get past your fear, in fact, it is more likely that insulin might have delayed or even prevented these complications if it had been started earlier. Myth: Insulin causes weight gain. Fact: It is true that many patients who begin insulin gain weight. Insulin helps your body use food more efficiently. If this is a concern, ask for a referral to a dietitian before you start insulin. Myth: Insulin injections are painful. Fact: Although no one likes shots, most people are surprised by how little an insulin i Continue reading >>

Myths And Misconceptions: Who Gets Diabetes And How It Can Affect You

Myths And Misconceptions: Who Gets Diabetes And How It Can Affect You

Learn more about the complications of diabetes . The information above shows that diabetes is indeed a serious disease. However, the good news is that if you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes and get serious about controlling your blood glucose and making healthy lifestyle changes, you can prevent or delay many of the complications associated with diabetes. For instance, results from a large US National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) study conducted at centers throughout the country over a period of 3 years, including over 3,000 individuals with prediabetes showed the power of lifestyle changes in reducing risk of progression to type 2 diabetes.2 In the study, participants were randomly assigned to different interventions, including an intensive program of lifestyle modification (a healthy diet, regular physical activity, and behavior modification) or drug therapy with the diabetes drug metformin and information on diet and physical activity. Both groups reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but the group that received lifestyle modification had the most dramatic reduction in risk. For participants in this group, a weight reduction of 5% to 7% (this translates to a loss of about 10-14 lbs in a person who weighs 200 lbs) reduced the risk of being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by almost 60%.2 This demonstrates the huge potential for lifestyle changes in reducing diabetes risk. And those lifestyle changes dont necessarily have to be extreme. To get their exercise, most participants in the DPP study were not running marathons, but walking regularly (at least 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week). Myth 2: People with diabetes are more likely to get colds or the flu FACT:If you have diabetes, your chances of getting a cold or Continue reading >>

5 Myths About The Diabetes Diet

5 Myths About The Diabetes Diet

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. Some popular ideas about the best foods for diabetes are downright misleading. Get the facts on the most common diabetes diet myths. When it comes to diet advice, everyone has an opinion. But when youre living with diabetes, you need to make diet choices based on fact, not fiction even if the advice is coming from friends or family members, who may mean well but arent experts on nutrition. Sometimes these "helpful hints" are based on something that has a thread of truth, but a crucial part becomes lost in translation. Here are five of the most common diabetes diet myths dispelled. Diet Myth: People With Diabetes Should Only Eat Special Foods Diabetes Diet Fact: There are no special foods for diabetes; rather, some food choices are better than others. A healthy diabetes diet is a diet that would benefit anyone, says Alison Massey, RD, LDN, CDE, a registered dietitian and diabetes educator at the Diabetes Center of Mercy Medical in Baltimore. The American Diabetes Association recommends a diet that is low in fat with meals centered around whole-grain foods, vegetables, and fruits. Although you'll likely need to make some dietary changes, such as limiting salt, sugar, and foods high in fats (especially saturated and trans fats), you can continue to enjoy measured amounts of many of the foods you love. It's important to learn about portion control and carboh Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month 2013: Facts And Myths About Diabetes

Diabetes Awareness Month 2013: Facts And Myths About Diabetes

Up to Date Medical News and Views from The University of Medicine and Health Sciences, St. Kitts Diabetes Awareness Month 2013: Facts and Myths About Diabetes TYPE 2 DIABETES: People with Type 2 have to check blood-sugar levels several times daily. Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Although there are so many awareness months for diseases and conditions, the UMHS Pulse wants to bring attention to diabetes because, according to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes kills more Americans each year than AIDS and breast cancer combined, and there are far too many misconceptions. To understand the scale of how serious diabetes is, heres what the Mayo Clinics website ( ) says about the different types of diabetes and the differences. Authors Nancy Klobassa Davidson, R.N., and Peggy Moreland, R.N. write on the Mayo Clinics Living with Diabetes blog that even if you dont have diabetes, healthy eating and exercise is good for you and may even prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: Type 1 diabetes was formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, because 70 percent of diagnoses occur before a person reaches the age of 30. However, it can be diagnosed at any age. Only 5 percent to 10 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes have this type. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little to no insulin. The onset of type 1 diabetes is usually sudden (acute) and clear-cut, when a person goes to their health care provider or the emergency room with symptoms of high blood sugar. Sometimes, a person with new-onset type 1 diabetes needs to be treated in an intensive care unit. Symptoms include increased urination, thirst or dry mouth, hunger, weight loss despite normal or increased eating, blurred vision Continue reading >>

7 Myths About Diabetes And 1 Absolute Truth

7 Myths About Diabetes And 1 Absolute Truth

7 Myths About Diabetes and 1 Absolute Truth Think you know all there is to know about diabetes? Think again. Diabetes isnt serious. That may depend on how you define serious. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDScombined. It also aggravates other conditions that are also life threatening; two out of three diabetics die from heart disease or stroke. Just because diabetes is becoming increasingly more manageable doesnt mean its not a serious condition with serious consequences. Only overweight or obese people get diabetes. This myth is a strong one, particularly for those of normal weight who get diagnosed with the disease. Where genetic disposition and unknown triggering factors cause Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 adds lifestyle factors into the equation. In fact, most overweight people never develop Type 2 diabetes as weight is only one of many risk factors. Sugar causes diabetes. Another common myth, sugar is often associated with diabetes because its a disease involving high blood sugar. While having a diet high in sugar can raise blood sugar, diabetes is a metabolic disease that involves the inability to produce the appropriate amount of insulin to handle the glucose. In this case, its not the sugar that causes diabetes; other risk factors, like genetics and prolonged obesity, cause the body to react to the sugar inappropriately. Diabetes is contagious. To put it simply, diabetes is not contagious. It may feel that way, when several members of a family are diagnosed, but that is a result of genetics, not poor hand washing. A diabetic diet is complicated and hard to maintain. The real myth here is that diabetic diet is different from what everyone should be eating. We all should have a meals filled wi Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Myths Put To Rest Once And For All

7 Diabetes Myths Put To Rest Once And For All

Even if you don't have diabetes, you can probably imagine how challenging it must be to live with a disease that requires such constant vigilance of your physical health. You might not immediately pick up on how mentally taxing diabetes can be, though. In fact, it's "considered to be one of the most psychologically demanding of the chronic medical illnesses and is often associated with several psychiatric disorders," Miami VA Medical Center experts write in the journal Clinical Diabetes. It might not be your first thought, but considering how much diabetes tends to be viewed through a lens of shame and blame, it doesn't seem so far-fetched after all. We don't blame you, either, for not totally getting it if you don't have diabetes. Whether you have it, know someone who does, worry about your risk of developing it, or hardly give it any thought, you've likely come across confusing diabetes misinformation. To help make it all a little less complicated, here are some of the most common myths about diabetes, debunked. Fact: Sorry, but no. There's a big physiological difference, actually. Type 1 diabetes means your body doesn't produce insulin. Everyone needs insulin; the hormone, produced by the pancreas, helps get energy in the form of glucose into our cells. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to mistakenly attack itself, in this case destroying insulin-producing cells. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, occurs when your body doesn't effectively use the insulin it does make, typically called insulin resistance. You may need a little extra dose to get the job done: While everyone with type 1 diabetes needs insulin injections, only about 30% of people with type 2 require the same treatment. (Here's more info on the differences between Type 1 and T Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths Busted.

Diabetes Myths Busted.

Posted on July 10, 2015 by American Diabetes Association Diabetes myths sure have been in the news lately. A heated debate, which took place primarily via social media, peaked last week and is still being discussed among our diabetes community and beyond. And for good reason. Its clear that we have a lot of educating yet to do about diabetes. Diabetes, in its many forms, is a complex disease. It is a topic that doesnt fit easily into 140 characters, try as we might sometimes. There are many myths that make it difficult for people to understand the hard facts about diabetessuch as, it is a serious and potentially deadly disease affecting nearly 30 million Americans. Jokes or shaming to supposedly spread awareness, or perpetuating ignorant stereotypes, compound the hurt. Diabetes threatens those we love. It is livedand battledevery day by real people and families. It is treated by knowledgeable and caring doctors, nurses, diabetes educators and other health care professionals. Scientific researchers dedicate their careers to improving diabetes treatments and finding a cure. We join the diverse diabetes community in setting the record straight. Lets start with some fundamental fact-checking. Type 1 diabetes is an unpreventable, life-threatening autoimmune disease for which there currently is no cure. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. It was formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. Type 1 is caused by genetics and unknown environmental factors that trigger its onset. Just to survive, people with type 1 must take multiple injections of insulin daily or continually infuse insulin with a pump. Multiple blood glucose checks and healthful eating and regular physical activity are also part of everyday treatment. Type 2 diabetes is the Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Medically reviewed by Peggy Pletcher, MS, RD, LD, CDE on May 10, 2016 Written by Annette McDermott and Ana Gotter Scouring the internet for reliable information about a diet for those with diabetes can leave you confused and misinformed. Theres no shortage of advice, but its often challenging to discern fact from fiction. Below we debunk 10 common diabetes diet myths. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), eating too much sugar alone doesnt cause diabetes, but it may be a contributing factor in some cases. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and possibly an autoimmune response to a trigger . Type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and various risk factors, some of which are related to lifestyle. Being overweight, having high blood pressure, being over the age of 45, and being sedentary are just some of the risk factors that can lead to diabetes. Sugar-sweetened drinks, such as sodas and fruit punches, are high in empty calories, and recent studies have linked these to a higher risk of diabetes. To help prevent diabetes, the ADA recommends avoiding them. However, other sweets by themselves are not a cause of diabetes. Carbs arent your enemy. It is not carbs themselves, but the type of carb and the quantity of carb that you eat that is important for those with diabetes. Not all carbs are created equal. Those that are low on the glycemic index (GI) scale, a measure of how quickly foods with carbohydrates may impact blood sugar levels, are better choices than those with a high GI, explains the ADA . Examples of low-GI carbs include: low-starch vegetables, such as spinach, broccoli, and tomatoes Its also a good idea to choose foods with a lower glycemic load (GL). GL is similar to GI, but it incorporates serving size into the calculation. Its considered a mor Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Not A Choice: American Diabetes Association

Diabetes Is Not A Choice: American Diabetes Association

Click here to share this important message on your social media channels. On behalf of the nearly 30 million Americans living with diabetes, the American Diabetes Association is extremely disappointed by the misinformed statement of Mick Mulvaney, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget , as reported by the Washington Examiner. Mr. Mulvaney's comments perpetuate the stigma that one chooses to have diabetes based on his/her lifestyle. We are also deeply troubled by his assertion that access to health care should be rationed or denied to anyone. All of the scientific evidence indicates that diabetes develops from a diverse set of risk factors, genetics being a primary cause. People with diabetes need access to affordable health care in order to effectively manage their disease and prevent dangerous and costly complications. Nobody should be denied coverage or charged more based on their health status. We are saddened by Mr. Mulvaney's comments, and we look forward to working closely with the White House and the Department of Health and Human Services to dispel the erroneous stigma around diabetes and the millions of Americans living with this disease. Continue reading >>

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