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Diabetes Mouth Ulcers

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

People with diabetes have a higher risk of tooth and gum problems. It is important to look after your oral health and control your blood glucose levels to prevent gum disease. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Quit smoking. On this page: People with diabetes who have irregular blood glucose levels have a higher risk of tooth problems and gum disease than people without diabetes. This is because they have lowered resistance to infection and may not heal as easily. If you are living with diabetes, you need to pay particular attention to your oral health and dental care, as well as controlling your blood glucose levels. Visit your dentist regularly for advice about how to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Diabetes is a common disease among Australians, affecting almost 1.5 million people (around 7.6 per cent of the population). The first signs and symptoms of diabetes can occur in the mouth, so paying attention to your oral health can also lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. The most common oral health problems affecting people with diabetes are: periodontal (gum) disease gum abscesses tooth decay fungal infections such as thrush lichen planus (an inflammatory, autoimmune skin condition) mouth ulcers taste disturbances a dry, burning mouth (low saliva levels). Diabetes and periodontal (gum) disease Periodontal (gum) disease is caused by an infection that destroys the bone surrounding and supporting your teeth. This bone holds your teeth into your jawbone and allows you to chew comfortably. Bacteria and food debris called dental plaque is essential for gum disease. If left on teeth and gums, plaque hardens to form calculus or tartar. The plaque and calculus irritate the gums around teeth so they become red, swollen a Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Mouth Ulcers | Health Navigator Nz

Mouth Ulcers | Health Navigator Nz

Most people get mouth ulcers at some time in their life and, while they can be painful, they usually heal quickly by themselves and cause no other problems. Rarely, though, there are more serious conditions underlying mouth ulcers. Mouth ulcers are breaks in the moist inside surfaces (mucosal membrane) of the mouth. Although generally quite small, their size can range from one millimetre up to several centimetres across. Looking like a shallow crater, they usually have a grey or yellow to white appearance. Some have a raised border. Nerves are close to the surface in the mouth, so any break in the membrane exposes them and causes pain . This can make eating, drinking and oral care very uncomfortable. One of the most common kinds of mouth ulcer is the aphthousulcer. These are small, painful ulcers that are yellow or grey with a red edge. They can appear alone or in groups. They may come back now and then. Small (minor) aphthous ulcers do not occur on the hard palate or gums. Aphthous ulcers are generally thought to occur as a result of the bodys own immune system damaging part of the mucosal membrane. They can occur: after minor injury, such as accidentally biting the tongue or a knock with a toothbrush with hormonal changes (for example at a particular time in a womans menstrual cycle) as a result of nutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, iron or folic acid. Other kinds of mouth ulcers can be caused by: an injury, such as ill-fitting dentures or a rough edge on a tooth a virus, such as herpes simplex ( cold sore ) or varicella zoster (which causes chicken pox and shingles ) Most mouth ulcers require no treatment and heal on their own within one to two weeks. Where there is an obvious cause, managing the cause will set the healing process in motion. For example: Ad Continue reading >>

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Oral Health Problems And Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that can affect the whole body — your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart, and other important systems in the body. It can also affect your mouth. People with diabetes face a higher than normal risk of oral health problems. Why are people with diabetes more likely to develop oral health problems? The link between diabetes and oral health problems is high blood sugar. If blood sugar is poorly controlled, oral health problems are more likely to develop. This is because uncontrolled diabetes weakens white blood cells, which are the body’s main defense against bacterial infections that can occur in the mouth. Just as studies have shown that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of major organ complications of diabetes — such as eye, heart, and nerve damage — so to can diabetes control protect against the development of oral health problems. Specifically, what are some of these oral health problems? Dry mouth: Uncontrolled diabetes can decrease saliva flow, resulting in dry mouth. Dry mouth can further lead to soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay. Gum inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontitis: Besides weakening white blood cells, another complication of diabetes is that it causes blood vessels to thicken. This slows the flow of nutrients to and waste products from body tissues, including the mouth. When this combination of events, the body loses its ability to fight infections. Since periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, people with uncontrolled diabetes might experience more frequent and more severe gum disease. Poor healing of oral tissues: People with uncontrolled diabetes do not heal quickly after oral surgery or other dental procedures because blood flow to the treatment site can be damaged. Thrush: People with diabetes Continue reading >>

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

Xerostomia is an ominous sounding name for a fairly common condition suffered by approximately 20% of the population, one that most people tend to underestimate, a dry mouth. In essence, having a dry mouth means the body is not producing enough saliva, which helps the mouth stay clean while removing harmful bacteria that can cause cavities and other painful infections in the mouth. Saliva neutralizes the acid in the mouth and is an important part of the digestive process as it provides the moisture needed to chew and swallow food. Dry Mouth Causes There are many causes of dry mouth, such as not drinking enough liquid during the day, smoking, and sleeping with your mouth open, among others. Dry mouth can also be caused by certain types of medication, such ADHD medicine, anti-histamines, antidepressants, sleep medications, and narcotics. When this is the case, the problem tends to disappear once the underlying cause is removed, meaning that a dry mouth is usually nothing more than a temporary problem with an easy fix. However, for individuals suffering from diabetes, having a dry mouth can be more than just a mild annoyance. Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes A dry mouth can exacerbate the side effects of diabetes, which will then lead to an increase in glucose levels, wreaking havoc on the body. A dry mouth is not only a symptom of high blood sugar, but it can also be the cause of it. Having a dry mouth, especially as a diabetic, can lead to rampant tooth decay, which means blood sugar increases as the body tries, and fails, to fight infection. A dry mouth can also lead to loss of sleep and an altered sense of taste, a condition that presents with a metallic or sour taste in the mouth. Treatments for Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes Because of the harmful effects of having a dry m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patient With Mouth Ulcer - My Mom | Practo Consult

Diabetes Patient With Mouth Ulcer - My Mom | Practo Consult

My mom has a diabetes since from the past ten years and it's under control. Her sugar level is low, no BP issue but since from three months mom is suffering again from mouth ulcers. The thing is that we try a lot of medication but no good result. And day by day the ulcers is spreading everywhere inside her mouth. Please suggest me what to do? Please help my mom. Please please please. Quick response will be appreciated. Thank you God bless Hello as a home remedy you can apply baking soda over your teeth or do baking soda in water mouthrinses. If the ulcer persists, you need to consult a physician and get your Vitamin B levels checked. If required take supplements for it. Let others know if this answer was helpful Hello,Mam,you need to consult an Oral Medicine specialist for the same.RegardsDr Sumanmakam Let others know if this answer was helpful Hello dear practo user, Although ulcers in mouth has varied etiology, it can be due to any gastrointestinal related issue like acid reflux. Or neuro psychiatric problem. Stress, anxiety etc can also be a cause. I suppose she must have consumed vitamin b complex as you said that a lot of medication has been given to her. Topical application of mild corticosteroids and anti inflammatory alternatives may be helpful. Let others know if this answer was helpful Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The internet is not a doctor and neither are you. Chat with a real doctor about your health. Sir/ma'am Continue reading >>

Mouth Sores Treatment & Causes

Mouth Sores Treatment & Causes

Jump to a Section in this Article: Mouth sores are painful ulcers found on the cheeks, lips, gums, tongue, bottom of the mouth, and the soft palate. These sores can be caused by a variety of factors, ranging from stress to gastrointestinal diseases. Mouth sore symptoms typically include a burning or tingling sensation inside the mouth followed by painful, sensitive ulcers. In more severe cases, mouth sores can be accompanied by swollen lymph nodes, physical fatigue, and fever. What Causes Mouth Sores? Common mouth sore causes include: biting your tongue, lip, or cheek; burning your mouth when attempting to eat hot food or beverages; or tissue trauma from braces, dentures, and other potentially sharp objects. Mouth sores can also be related to the consumption of acidic foods and drinks. Canker Sores Causes There is no known cause for canker sores. They appear as pale gray ulcers with a red outer ring. Unlike cold sores, for which they are sometimes mistaken, canker sores are not contagious, but are though to be brought on by a variety of triggers, including: Weakened immune system (due to a viral infection) Stress Hormonal changes Sensitivity to acidic foods Poor diet lacking in certain vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin B12 Sodium lauryl sulfate (found in toothpastes and mouthwashes) Research has also associated canker sores with several inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, Celiac disease, and Behcet’s disease, plus diseases related to a suppressed immune system, such as HIV/AIDS. Cold Sores Causes Cold sores appear as small fluid-filled ulcers around the lips. They are caused by the herpes simplex virus and are extremely contagious. The virus can lay dormant for years after the initial infection, but can reappear as cold sores trigger Continue reading >>

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Burning Mouth Syndrome And Diabetes

Diana Tosuni-O'Neill RDH, BS Have you ever felt like your mouth was on fire? This painful sensation can make you feel as if you've scalded your mouth, and can spread to your tongue, gums, lips and inside of your cheeks. According to the Mayo Clinic, this condition is called burning mouth syndrome — it has no visible signs, and it can last from months to years. We do now know that burning mouth syndrome and diabetes can be related, so it's easier to diagnose and treat in diabetics. And it doesn't have to be a life sentence. Here are the common causes of burning mouth syndrome and how to treat them. Possible Causes There are many causes of burning mouth syndrome, and some people, such as diabetics and postmenopausal women, are more likely to suffer from it. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), the most common causes include the following: Damage to nerves controlling oral senses such as taste Hormonal changes Nutritional deficiencies Fungal infections in the mouth Acid reflux Dentures that don't fit properly Anxiety and depression With so many possible causes, it's often difficult to clinically point out the culprit in many cases. People with uncontrolled or marginally controlled diabetes can usually narrow down the most probable causes to dry mouth, oral thrush and sometimes neurological abnormalities. Neuropathy (when nerve damage or weakness occurs to the hands and feet) may lead to oral tingling, burning or pain caused by changes in the nerves within the oral region as well. Symptoms and Treatments Moderate to severe burning in the mouth is one of the main symptoms of this disorder. For many people, the burning sensation begins in late morning, builds to a peak by evening, and often subsides at night. Some feel the pain co Continue reading >>

Slideshow: Diabetes And Your Mouth

Slideshow: Diabetes And Your Mouth

4 Signs You May Have a Problem Diabetes puts you at risk for dental problems. It hurts your ability to fight bacteria in your mouth. Having high blood sugar encourages bacteria to grow and contributes to gum disease. You may have gum disease if you have: Gums that are red, sore, bleeding, or swollen, or that pull away from your teeth Loose teeth Chronic bad breath An irregular bite or dentures that don't fit well Well-controlled diabetes helps keep your mouth healthy. If you have poorly controlled or high blood sugar, you have a higher chance of dry mouth, gum disease, tooth loss, and fungal infections like thrush. Since infections can also make your blood sugar rise, your diabetes may become harder to control. Keeping your mouth healthy can help you manage your blood sugar. People with diabetes are more likely to have oral infections. You should get dental checkups at least twice a year. Let your dentist know you have diabetes and what medicines you take. Regular checkups and professional cleanings can help keep a mouth healthy. And your dentist can teach you the best ways to care for your teeth and gums at home. Sticky plaque -- food, saliva, and bacteria -- starts to form on your teeth after you eat, releasing acids that attack tooth enamel. Untreated plaque turns into tartar, which builds under gum lines and is hard to remove with flossing. The longer it stays on your teeth, the more harmful it is. Bacteria in plaque causes inflammation and leads to gum disease. High blood sugar can make gum disease worse. When you brush your teeth twice a day, it not only keeps your breath fresh, but it also helps rid your mouth of bacteria that makes up plaque and can lead to infections. To brush properly, point your bristles at a 45-degree angle against your gums. Use gentle back Continue reading >>

Mouth Ulcers

Mouth Ulcers

Mouth ulcers are painful sores that appear in the mouth. Although they're uncomfortable, they're usually harmless and most clear up by themselves within a week or two. Mouth ulcers are common and can usually be managed at home, without seeing your dentist or GP. Visit your pharmacist first, unless your ulcer has lasted longer than three weeks. What does a mouth ulcer look like? Mouth ulcers are usually round or oval sores that commonly appear inside the mouth on the: cheeks lips tongue They can be white, red, yellow or grey in colour and swollen. It's possible to have more than one mouth ulcer at a time and they may spread or grow. Mouth ulcers shouldn't be confused with cold sores, which are small blisters that develop on the lips or around the mouth. Cold sores often begin with a tingling, itching or burning sensation around your mouth. When to see your pharmacist, dentist or GP Mouth ulcers can be painful, which can make it uncomfortable to eat, drink or brush your teeth. It's usually safe to treat mouth ulcers at home. See your GP or dentist if: your mouth ulcer has lasted three weeks you keep getting mouth ulcers your mouth ulcer becomes more painful or red – this could be a sign of a bacterial infection, which may need treatment with antibiotics Mouth ulcers are also a possible symptom of a viral infection that mainly affects young children, called hand, foot and mouth disease. Speak to your GP or call NHS 111 if you're unsure. Read about the symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease. How to treat mouth ulcers Mouth ulcers don’t usually need to be treated, because they tend to clear up by themselves within a week or two. However, treatment can help to reduce swelling and ease any discomfort. This may help if you keep getting mouth ulcers or your mouth ulcer aff Continue reading >>

Mouth Ulcers - Diabetes Dental Care

Mouth Ulcers - Diabetes Dental Care

Mouth ulcers are sores that appear in the mouth, often on the inside of the cheeks. Mouth ulcers, also known as apthous ulcers, can be painful when eating, drinking or brushing teeth. Occasional mouth ulcers are usually harmless and clear up on their own. Contact us if they last longer than 3 weeks or keep coming back. Up to 1 in 5 people get recurrent mouth ulcers. The exact cause of most mouth ulcers is unknown. Stress or tissue injury is thought to be the cause of simple mouth ulcers. Certain foods, including citrus or acidic fruits and vegetables (such as lemons, oranges, pineapples, apples, figs, tomatoes and strawberries), can trigger a mouth ulcer or make the problem worse. Sometimes a sharp tooth surface or dental appliance, such as braces or ill-fitting dentures, might also trigger mouth ulcers. Some cases of complex mouth ulcers are caused by an underlying health condition, such as an impaired immune system. When you first quit smoking, you may develop more mouth ulcers than normal, but this is temporary. Some medications, including common pain killers, beta-blockers and some chest pain medicines may cause a reaction that leads to mouth ulcers. You might experience a painful sore or sores inside your mouth, on the tongue, soft palate (the back portion of the roof of your mouth), or inside your cheeks. They look like sores in your mouth that are round, white, or grey in colour, with a red edge or border. Only in severe mouth ulcer attacks, you may also experience fever, physical sluggishness or swollen lymph nodes. Continue reading >>

Mouth Ulcers Due To Diabetes

Mouth Ulcers Due To Diabetes

Mouth ulcers are small, whitish red craters that crop up on the gums, tongue or inside the cheek. These ulcers are so tender that it becomes hard to eat without major pain. Mouth ulcers can be caused by a variety of causes. Diabetes mellitus is among one of them. This causes erosion of the soft delicate tissue inside the mouth. Their colour is red or yellow and occur either in group or single. Mouth ulcers are not harmful and get cured automatically in a week without any medication. Some are recurring ulcers called Aphthous ulcers with no known cause. Diabetes mellitus also causes recurrent mouth ulcers. Symptoms Of Mouth Ulcers: Mouth ulcers symptoms depend on the cause, but it can include- A round sore or a group of sores inside the mouth Tenderness Swollen skin around the sores Irritation of the sores by spicy, salty or sour foods Problems with chewing or brushing because of the tenderness Loss of appetite. Causes Of Mouth Ulcers: The causes of mouth ulcers may be more likely if the patient has diabetes , or is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. Apart from diabetes, there are other major causes of mouth ulcers- Injury from a toothbrush Accidental biting of the cheek. Poor oral hygiene. Burns from eating hot food. Oral thrush infection. Herpes simplex viral infection Autoimmune diseases Syphilis infection. Reaction to certain drugs, such as chemotherapeutic agents. Certain diseases including tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus, AIDS and inflammatory bowel disease. It is required to manage conditions like diabetes properly to prevent mouth ulcers. When you develop the mouth ulcers, you should consult your doctor. Continue reading >>

Mouth Ulcers? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Mouth Ulcers? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Has anyone else been troubled with mouth ulcers and infections? Been battling for months, antibiotics don't help, I was told once on insulin and contolling my BS it would settle. My readings are now quite good and the Endo has been happy but the ulcers have broken out again despite good mouth hygiene. I'm at my wits end to know how to stop them, tried all Chemist products but still no relief. The best relief I get is from Kenalog. Its a gel that is like a comedy act trying to put on the ulcer if you dont dry the ulcer first. Just pat it dry with a tissue etc & the gel sets on it easily. I also like zinc & vit C lozengers or tabs but try to keep them in the mouth as long as possible. Then use the kenalog. I had tonsilitis recently as well as ulcers. Difflam lozenges gave some relief but because I had so many they had a laxative effect I've had problems with apthous ulcers on the sides of my tongue for the past few months. I use Peroxyl, a peroxide-based mouthwash and benzacaine to numb the area. The doctor told me these can be brought on by stress, lowered immune system, some foods, some meds...and that once you have them, you are more likely to continue to have them. Mine seem to take 7-10 days to go away...and they are really painful. Fortunately, I only get one at a time. For a few years before I as diagnosed, I had mouth ulcer breakouts. Nothing since I've gotten control of my sugar - also I think my immune system is a bit better, but I also have auto-immune hives, and when I have the hives, my body is stressed with autoimmune response. I have some sores and infection in my mouth from time Continue reading >>

Mouth Ulcers & Thrush

Mouth Ulcers & Thrush

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi I have been getting mouth ulcers very bad at the moment they appearing my tongue either on the left or on the right the one I have at the moment stretches along the whole left side of my tongue, now if that's not bad enough I also get horrible bouts of thrush which gets very painful, I have been to the doctors yet again today but I feel that I am putting them out as all they tell me it's a complication of diabetes just getting so so fed up with it and the more I get down and low the more my sugars rise just tested my bloods and they are 31.5!! Just don't know what to do xx Ouch. Do you usually have better bg levels? My thrush cleared up when my bg improved. Sorry Bigrob, i don't have any advice on insulin, but you have my sympathy. The thrush wears you down and gives you ulcers, this increases bg, which make you feel crap, which wears you down...it's a vicious circle Someone with advice on insulin will be along in a moment. Best wishes and good luck. Have not got any useful info sorry Rob but levels at 31.5 I would of thought your healthcare professionals should take a bit more notice. As previous post it's a vicious circle, all I can offer is advice to exercise, eat low carbs, try not to stress and wish you the best, obviously the thrush is pissing too much sugar, I used to get this constant but that was before I went over to insulin. I'm sure someone with much better advice and help will be along soon. That's high isn't it so no wonder you are suffering. What medication are you taking for your diabetes? Have they given you any mediation to help with your mouth ulcers/thrush? Unfortunately, you won't get rid of it completely until your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

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