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Diabetes Motivation Strengthening

Motivational Interviewing To Promote Adherence Behaviors In Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

Motivational Interviewing To Promote Adherence Behaviors In Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

Motivational Interviewing to Promote Adherence Behaviors in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Childrens Hospital, 1102 Bates St. Suite 940.37, Houston, TX 77030, USA Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Childrens Hospital, 1102 Bates St. Suite 940.35A, Houston, TX 77030, USA Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Childrens Hospital, 1102 Bates St. Suite 940.36, Houston, TX 77030, USA Priscilla W. Powell, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Childrens Hospital, 1102 Bates St. Suite 940.37, Houston, TX 77030, USA; The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Curr Diab Rep See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Suboptimal regimen adherence among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common challenge for patients, families, and providers. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a brief communication style designed to elicit intrinsic motivation and strengthen commitment to behavior change goals. As pediatric MI research expands, a critical review of its evidence base and applicability to promote adherence behaviors for youth with T1D is needed. This review introduces the core tenets of MI and clinical applications in T1D, synthesizes the existing MI research in T1D, and discusses the next steps in MI research. Overall, mixed results for MI interventions in T1D reflect variations in research study design and clinical implementation. Targeting adherence rather than glycemic outcomes typically demonstrates greater results, highlighting the promise of MI to facilitate meaningful and enduring improvements in youths T1D adherence behaviors. Keywords: Type 1 diabetes, Adherence, Motivational interviewing, Behavioral Intervention, Health care providers, Pediatrics Despite rapid advances in medical regimens and health technology Continue reading >>

Diabetes Exercise: 7 Steps To Start Walking

Diabetes Exercise: 7 Steps To Start Walking

People are walking more. In 2005, 56 percent of adults said they went on a 10-minute walk at least once a week, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2010, the number rose to 62 percent. Today, about 145 million adults include walking as part of their physical activity, and it's no surprise. "Walking allows you to be more mobile," says Devon Dobrosielski, Ph.D., researcher and exercise physiologist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. "It builds muscle strength, which is vital to avoiding disability, frailty, and falls later in life." In just seven simple steps, you can jump on the bandwagon and start pounding the pavement today. 1. Make a Plan The best way to start a new exercise program is to schedule it. Carve time into your day and plant reminders, such as exercise clothes and shoes near your bed, to make it easy to stay on track, says Caroline Bohl, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator and personal trainer at the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center in New York City. 2. Keep Yourself Motivated Build in rewards for yourself, such as listening to a radio program, music, or a book on tape while you walk. Music can help in multiple ways: It distracts from the effort and the passage of time, and it encourages you to pick up the pace, Bohl says. Or catch up with a long-distance friend on your cell phone (as long as you're safe from traffic). Walking with a partner -- human or a pet -- helps to hold you accountable. "When people get a dog, their physical activity goes through the roof," says Brett Ives, CDE, clinical outreach coordinator at Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York City. Join or form a walking club (check with your local American Diabetes Association office, gym, or YMCA) to socialize while you work out. Social media and smartpho Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

How To Stay Motivated With Diabetes

How To Stay Motivated With Diabetes

What is motivation? Is it something we are born with or is it something that we must constantly work on? When life gets tough, motivation can be the difference between lazing around on bed while you procrastinate or setting strict goals so that you can attain them. It is easy to talk about wanting to set goals so your blood sugar levels are well controlled, go for that daily 30 minutes walk on chilly evenings, and stay away from the dessert menu. But in order to complete your tasks, you must feel motivated! Managing diabetes can be overwhelming. Many people who have diabetes can lose the motivation to keep it under control. The M word does not require magic or constant nagging. There are ways you can start feeling motivated and keep on track. Read on to see what experts have to share on how they stay motivated in attaining goals, whether it is in regard to managing their diabetes or other simple routines. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. Another injection? ANOTHER trip to the gym? A N O T H E R yummy food declined? Motivation can be difficult when the reminders of what youre battling against are so ever-present. One important tip for maintaining motivation is to quit thinking about the battle against diabetes. Im not fighting against diabetes, I am working for a joy-filled life lived fully as can be. Research by Dr. Carolyn Leaf and many others reminds us how much more creative, courageous and capable the human brain is when it focuses on positivity. Think in terms of the positive outcomes of doing the work of challenging diabetes or any health issue: time Continue reading >>

When The Motivation To Manage Diabetes Sags

When The Motivation To Manage Diabetes Sags

When the Motivation to Manage Diabetes Sags Theres big news recently news that might make todays entry obsolete in another year or so. In fact, its the kind of news that might mean this whole blog becomes obsolete in another 510 years. The FDA has approved the first artificial pancreas ( and you can read all about it in Diane Fennells blog entry right here )! It will be the first device that seriously alters how we live with this disease. It will lift a good deal of the minute-to-minute management of blood sugars off our shoulders and automate it. But until the artificial pancreas really takes hold, we will all be stuck managing this whole thing ourselves, just like we always have. And that, after this prolonged introduction, brings me to the focus of todays entry: how to maintain (and appropriately manage) our motivation to manage diabetes. Keeping our motivation up isnt always easy. Diabetes is a never-ending task that can be very unforgiving if we give in to carelessness. And when we do manage to keep ourselves in line, the reward isnt something exciting its good general health. Yes, thats a wonderful thing, but sometimes it can be tough to put in all this extra work just get a little closer to normal. In addition, diabetes is correlated with a higher rate of depression, a condition with a devastating impact on ones ability to keep up motivation. Researchers havent been able to pinpoint precisely why this correlation exists (and of course, depression can have a number of triggers), but its likely that the stress of diabetes management can be a catalyst for the onset of depression. Its clear that motivation and emotional well-being are worth taking seriously for anyone living with diabetes. Were generally very good about tracking our blood sugar numbers. We understan Continue reading >>

Management Of Type 2 Diabetes In China: The Happy Life Club, A Pragmatic Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial Using Health Coaches

Management Of Type 2 Diabetes In China: The Happy Life Club, A Pragmatic Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial Using Health Coaches

Objective To assess the effectiveness of a coach-led motivational interviewing (MI) intervention in improving glycaemic control, as well as clinical, psychosocial and self-care outcomes of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared with usual care. Participants Of the 41 randomised CHSs (21 intervention and 20 control), 21 intervention CHSs (372 participants) and 18 control CHSs (296 participants) started participation. Intervention Intervention participants received telephone and face-to-face MI health coaching in addition to usual care from their CHS. Control participants received usual care only. Medical fees were waived for both groups. Outcome measures Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure was glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary outcomes included a suite of anthropometric, blood pressure (BP), fasting blood, psychosocial and self-care measures. Results At 12 months, no differential treatment effect was found for HbA1c (adjusted difference 0.02, 95% CI −0.40 to 0.44, p=0.929), with both treatment and control groups showing significant improvements. However, two secondary outcomes: psychological distress (adjusted difference −2.38, 95% CI −4.64 to −0.12, p=0.039) and systolic BP (adjusted difference −3.57, 95% CI −6.08 to −1.05, p=0.005) were robust outcomes consistent with significant differential treatment effects, as supported in sensitivity analyses. Interestingly, in addition to HbA1c, both groups displayed significant improvements in triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. Conclusions In line with the current Chinese primary healthcare reform, this study is the first large-scale cluster RCT to be implemented within real-world CHSs in China, specifically addressing T2DM. Although Continue reading >>

Effect Of Motivational Interviewing On Self-management In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis - Sciencedirect

Effect Of Motivational Interviewing On Self-management In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis - Sciencedirect

Effect of motivational interviewing on self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis Author links open overlay panel DanSonga Tu-ZhenXub Qiu-HuaSuna Open Access funded by Chinese Nursing Association The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of motivational interviewing (MI) on self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes. Randomised controlled trials that assessed the effects of MI on self-management and HbA1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes were systematically reviewed using multiple electronic databases. Weighted mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for continuous data. Ten trials were included in this meta-analysis. The self-management ability of patients with type 2 diabetes who underwent MI was significantly better than that of patients in the control group (WMD, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.772.98; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis showed that short-term MI (6 months) resulted in a significant decrease in the HbA1c level (p<0.05) but that this advantage was not present for relatively long-term MI (>6 months) (p>0.05). MI was associated with improved self-management abilities among patients with type 2 diabetes, and short-term MI (6 months) effectively decreased the HbA1c level. The effect of long-term MI (>6 months) on the HbA1c level remains uncertain. Large-scale, higher-quality randomised controlled trials are needed to confirm the present findings. Continue reading >>

An Empowering Approach To Promote The Quality Of Life And Self-management Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients

An Empowering Approach To Promote The Quality Of Life And Self-management Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients

An empowering approach to promote the quality of life and self-management among type 2 diabetic patients We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. An empowering approach to promote the quality of life and self-management among type 2 diabetic patients Azar Tol, Fatemeh Alhani, [...], and Nahid Moazam Type 2 diabetes is one of the most serious health concerns and policy agendas around the world. Epidemiological evidence suggests that it will likely continue to increase globally. Diabetes is strongly associated with the patients unhealthy lifestyle and behavioral patterns and socio-economic changes. New model of thinking is required to recognize whether the patients are in control of and responsible for the daily self-management of diabetes. Such a new approach should be based on empowerment and involvement to be more applicable to daily activities in diabetic patients. Rapid changes toward patient empowerment and increasing involvement of patients in their care plan indicate more emphasis on disease prevention and health promotion and education than on mere disease and its treatment. Such changes make a step toward pervasive sense of responsibility among patients about their illness for their daily activities. Using the empowerment approach, healthcare professionals would help patients make informed decisions in accordance with their particular circumstances. Patient empowerment implies a patient-centered, collaborative app Continue reading >>

Improving Patients' Adherence To Physical Activity In Diabetes Mellitus: A Review

Improving Patients' Adherence To Physical Activity In Diabetes Mellitus: A Review

Improving Patients' Adherence to Physical Activity in Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Department of Endocrinology and Institute of Diabetes, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, China. Corresponding author: Zi-lin Sun. Department of Endocrinology and Institute of Diabetes, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, No. 87 DingJiaQiao, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210009, China. [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2012 Korean Diabetes Association This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Regular physical activity (PA) is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay T2DM and its complications, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. However, most people with T2DM are not active and show poor adherence. This paper reviews the possible barriers to PA and strategies to improve the adherence to PA. Based on the currently available literature, it is concluded that self-efficacy and social support from family, friends, and health care providers play the important role in adoption and maintenance of regular PA. Here we also highlight some new modern and innovative interventions that facilitate exercise participation and improve the adherence. Keywords: Adherence, Diabetes mellitus, Education, Motor activity, Self efficacy, Social sup Continue reading >>

Improving Self-management Of Type 2 Diabetes In Overweight And Inactive Patients Through An Educational And Motivational Intervention Addressing Diet And Physical Activity: A Prospective Study In Naples, South Italy

Improving Self-management Of Type 2 Diabetes In Overweight And Inactive Patients Through An Educational And Motivational Intervention Addressing Diet And Physical Activity: A Prospective Study In Naples, South Italy

Improving Self-Management of Type 2 Diabetes in Overweight and Inactive Patients Through an Educational and Motivational Intervention Addressing Diet and Physical Activity: A Prospective Study in Naples, South Italy 1Department of Movement Sciences and Wellbeing, University of Naples Parthenope, Naples, Italy 2Department of Sciences and Technologies, University of Naples Parthenope, Naples, Italy 3Local Health Agency Naples 1 Center, Naples, Italy Francesca Gall, Email: [email protected] . Nutrition and physical activity are key elements in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. A community-based, multidisciplinary educational intervention aimed to improve quality of life and disease self-management in sedentary, overweight/obese type 2 diabetic patients was implemented in Naples, South Italy. The 9-month intervention included a motivational program, a nutrition program, and an exercise program. Satisfaction, worry, and embarrassment regarding their condition, together with disease-related behaviors and propensity towards physical activity, were evaluated through a validated questionnaire before and after the intervention; health status perception was evaluated through the short-form 12 questionnaire. Changes in HbA1c level and weight were also checked. A significant improvement (p<0.05) was registered in behaviors related to the management of hypoglycemic crisis and food choice; in nearly all the items related to living with the disease (p<0.01); and in health status perception (p<0.01). The adoption of healthy behavior was more common among women (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.09, 3.02) and persons with higher educational levels (OR 1.26, 95% CI 0.83, 2.17; OR 1.54, 95% CI 0.56, 2.27). About 30% of participants did not modify their emotional status afte Continue reading >>

Singapores War On Diabetes Aims To Save Lives And Limbs In A State Where The Disease Causes Four Amputations A Day

Singapores War On Diabetes Aims To Save Lives And Limbs In A State Where The Disease Causes Four Amputations A Day

Singapores war on diabetes aims to save lives and limbs in a state where the disease causes four amputations a day Its estimated that one in eight Singaporeans have diabetes, compared to one in 10 Hongkongers, and experts say those numbers will continue to rise; Lion City focuses on prevention, starting in childhood Do you love your wife and your grandchildren? the doctor asked his patient, after telling him that he had type 2 diabetes. Bagio Tomas Soliano was shocked as his doctor described the urgent lifestyle changes needed if he wanted to spend many more years with his family. One in three of worlds adults with diabetes is in China, WHO reports Just six months before, the 57-year-old had been given a clean bill of health during a routine check-up. Diabetes had set in quickly, with his blood-sugar level (tested while fasting) shooting up to what Soliano describes as a crazy reading of 18.5 millimoles per litre; normal levels are between three and six mmol/L. Type 1 diabetics either produce too little or no insulin, a hormone that allows your body to use glucose for energy or storage, and helps to regulate blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetics are resistant to the insulin they produce. The doctor told him such a sudden onset of diabetes was unusual and alarming and he wanted him to start daily insulin injections. Hold on. Slow down. Let me see what else I can do first, Soliano told the doctor. This scene in Singapore plays out all too frequently in other Asian cities, too. The International Diabetes Federation estimates the number of adults with diabetes worldwide is 415 million, and is set to rise to 642 million in 2040. The Asian Diabetes Prevention Initiative says 60 per cent of the worlds diabetics live in Asia. In Singapore, one in eight adults are estimated to h Continue reading >>

Strengthening Diabetes Retinopathy Services In India: Qualitative Insights Into Providers' Perspectives: The India 11-city 9-state Study Kannuri Nk, Anchala R, Murthy Gv, Gilbert Ce - Indian J Endocr Metab

Strengthening Diabetes Retinopathy Services In India: Qualitative Insights Into Providers' Perspectives: The India 11-city 9-state Study Kannuri Nk, Anchala R, Murthy Gv, Gilbert Ce - Indian J Endocr Metab

There is a global epidemic of diabetes. About 382 million people live with diabetes (8.3% of the world's adult population in 2013) and by 2035, this will have increased by 55% to 592 million. [1] Many emerging economies contribute to this global epidemic. According to a study conducted by the Indian Council for Medical Research in 2011, India has 62.4 million people with type 2 diabetes. [2] It is further projected by the International Diabetes Federation that by 2030, this will increase to 100 million. [1] Studies in different parts of the country reveal a high and increasing prevalence in both urban and rural areas, with a higher prevalence being reported from urban areas. Most of this evidence comes from South and Central India. In South India, the prevalence of diabetes among adults is estimated to be around 20% in urban areas and nearly 10% in rural areas. [3] As the epidemic matures and diabetics live longer, the cardiovascular, renal, and ocular complications will increase, imposing a burden on health care facilities. [4] Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major microvascular complication of diabetes, has a significant impact on the World's Health Systems. According to an estimate, the number of people with DR will grow from 126.6 million in 2010 to 191.0 million by 2030. If this is not addressed appropriately, it is further projected that sight-threatening DR (STDR) will increase from 37.3 million to 56.3 million. [5] An estimated 6 million diabetics in India have STDR. If the proportion of diabetics STDR remains the same over time, the number will increase to over 10 million by 2035. The broad aims of the study were to understand the provider perspective on the delivery of health services for diabetes and its complications, specifically the eye complications in Indi Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

How To Build Muscle With Diabetes?

This article is suitable for anyone interested in improving the look of their body right through to the professional bodybuilder, and athlete looking to improve performance. How do you build muscle? Lift weights? Consume enough protein? Get enough rest? {Repeat} ^ Yes, Pretty much! Everyone has the potential to build muscle over the course of their lifetime. Some people are happy with the level of muscle mass they have while others desire more for performance and aesthetic related reasons. The ability to gain muscle is highly specific to an individual’s genetics, baseline hormone levels and day to day activity. Many of these factors change as we age, reducing our capacity to gain muscle as we age. In other words, Muscle mass increases as we age up until a certain point. The effect of age on work capacity and muscle growth is a complex and lengthy subject. In fact, there is an hour long video module on the topic on the member’s site (coming soon). Anyhow, The best way to stimulate muscle growth is regular weights resistance training or loaded body movement. Even though we perform loaded movements daily, such as Squatting down to pick up our pets, Carrying the groceries to the car, Pushing annoying people ‘out the way.’ Pulling the kids around, Picking things up (hip-hinge) of the ground Day to Day Movement Isn’t Enough. None of these movements load our muscles heavily or frequently enough to stimulate gains in muscle mass. Weights resistance training is an incredibly useful tool for increasing muscle mass, especially with diabetes. The intensity (load) and frequency of training determine the stress placed on the body’s musculature and consequently determine how fast muscle tissue is gained. Training means nothing without recovery. For the body to get the best Continue reading >>

12 Motivational Quotes For Diabetics

12 Motivational Quotes For Diabetics

Diabetes can be a very devastating disease for one to endure. For one, they will need medicine for diabetes (insulin shots) for the rest of their life as , as there is no definite cure for the disease yet. It can be very tiring, even discouraging, to be in such a health situation. But dont give up. Here are 12 motivational quotes you can share with any of your friends or family who are diabetic. Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going. One of the most amazing things that can keep you focused on managing your diabetes is motivation from friends, family, or even yourself. Once youre able to consistently do that, it forms into a good habit, which is tough to break. People take ownership of sickness and disease by saying things like MY high blood pressure MY diabetes, MY heart disease, MY depression, MY! MY! MY! Dont own it because it doesnt belong to you! Words have power, and Stella Payton has a point. Dont give the disease any more permission to ransack your body by claiming its yours. Say something more positive like, I have diabetes, but Im working on it. Believe you can and youre halfway there. It all starts in the mind. Just keep reminding yourself that you can beat this. Let food be your medicine, and medicine your food. The key to keeping your blood sugar level down is to keep eating a balanced diet (fruits, vegetables, and meat). That way you dont end up relying on artificial meds too much. A mind is like a parachute, it doesnt work if it isnt open. Constantly remind yourself that youll beat this. Youll be surprised to see your bodying following what your mind is saying. A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles. Take it from Superman himself, who suffered from par Continue reading >>

9 Self-motivators To Exercise For Diabetes

9 Self-motivators To Exercise For Diabetes

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. 9 Self-Motivators to Exercise for Diabetes How to Stay Motivated to Exercise With Diabetes Exercise is important for everyone, but when you have diabetes , it's vital. Because of all the exercise benefits, the American Diabetes Association recommends about 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise at least five days a week. "Exercise improves insulin resistance and changes how the liver processes glucose and fat," says Amber Taylor, MD, director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "It improves your blood pressure and lipid profile, increasing "good" HDL cholesterol. And physical activity builds muscle and burns calories, which helps in efforts to lose weight." Regular fitness can even boost your mood. But sometimes just knowing the many benefits of exercise with diabetes isn't enough. You also need exercise motivation, says Scott Weiss, DPT, an athletic trainer and physical therapist at Bodhizone, a wellness and physical therapy center in New York City. Here are ways to stay focused, enjoy working out, and fit exercise into your life. If you're bored with exercise, it may be time to change up your workout routine. This could mean changing the setting, increasing the intensity, or trying a new activity. " Mixing workout types helps prevent boredom and keeps challenging new muscle groups," Dr. Taylor says. Plus, combining different Continue reading >>

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