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Diabetes Mortality Rates

National Diabetes Fact Sheet

National Diabetes Fact Sheet

National estimates and general information on diabetes in Italy were derived from the official statistics. Prevalence estimates of diabetes were derived from the Multipurpose Surveys on Household conducted by ISTAT (National Bureau of Statistics). Hospitalization rates were derived from the National Hospital Discharge Record database held by the Ministry of Health . Mortality rates for diabetes were derived from the National Mortality Database (ISTAT). Prevalence of diabetes in Italy, all ages, 2001-2015 Crude and age-sex standardized percentage of people that reported to have diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes by gender and age, Italy, 2015 Percentage of people that reported to have diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes by area, Italy, 2015 Percentage of people that reported to have diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes by Region, Italy 2015 Percentage of people that reported to have diabetes. Hospitalization rates by gender, Italy, 2000-2010. Age standardized rates per 100.000 residents. Discharges with diabetes as main diagnosis. Source: Ministry of Health data, ISTAT elaboration . Mortality rates for diabetes by gender, Italy, 2000-2009. Age standardized rates per 100.000 residents. Deaths with diabetes as leading cause. Continue reading >>

Examining Trends In Type 2 Diabetes Incidence, Prevalence And Mortality In The Uk Between 2004 And 2014

Examining Trends In Type 2 Diabetes Incidence, Prevalence And Mortality In The Uk Between 2004 And 2014

Abstract Contemporary data describing type 2 diabetes prevalence, incidence and mortality are limited. We aimed to (1) estimate annual incidence and prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes in the UK between 2004 and 2014, (2) examine relationships between observed rates with age, gender, socio-economic status and geographic region, and (3) assess how temporal changes in incidence and all-cause mortality rates influence changes in prevalence. Type 2 diabetes patients aged ≥16 years between January 2004 and December 2014 were identified using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Up to 5 individuals without diabetes were matched to diabetes patients based on age, gender and the general practice. Annual incidence, prevalence and mortality rates were calculated per 10 000 person-years at risk (95% CI). Survival models compared mortality rates in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. Prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes increased from 3.21% (3.19; 3.22) in 2004 to 5.26% (5.24; 5.29) in 2014. Incidence rates remained stable, overall, throughout the study period. Higher incidence and prevalence rates were related to male gender and deprivation. Individuals with type 2 diabetes were associated with higher risk of mortality (Hazard ratio 1.26 [1.20; 1.32]). Mortality rates declined in patients with and without diabetes throughout the study period. The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes in patients aged 16 to 34 years increased over time. The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the UK over the last decade is probably explained by patients living longer rather than by increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Even Deadlier Than We Thought, Study Suggests

Diabetes Is Even Deadlier Than We Thought, Study Suggests

Nearly four times as many Americans may die of diabetes as indicated on death certificates, a rate that would bump the disease up from the seventh-leading cause of death to No. 3, according to estimates in a recent study. Researchers and advocates say that more-precise figures are important as they strengthen the argument that more should be done to prevent and treat diabetes, which affects the way sugar is metabolized in the body. “We argue diabetes is responsible for 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., rather than 3.3 percent that death certificates indicate,” lead study author Andrew Stokes of the Boston University School of Public Health said in an interview. About 29 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There are two forms of the disease: Type 1, in which the pancreas makes insufficient insulin, and the more common Type 2, in which the body has difficulty producing and using insulin. Using findings from two large national surveys, the study looked mainly at A1C levels (average blood sugar over two to three months) and patient-reported diabetes. In the latest study, researchers compared death rates of diabetics who had participated in these surveys to information on their death certificates. The authors also found that diabetics had a 90 percent higher mortality rate over a five-year period than nondiabetics. This held true when controlling for age, smoking, race and other factors. “These findings point to an urgent need for strategies to prevent diabetes in the general population. For those already affected, they highlight the importance of timely diagnosis and aggressive management to prevent complications, such as coronary heart disease, stroke and lower-extremity amputations,” Stokes said. “We hope Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

35 Years Of American Death

35 Years Of American Death

Researchers have long argued that where we live can help predict how we die. But how much our location affects our health is harder to say, because death certificates, the primary source for mortality data, are not always complete. They frequently contain what public health experts call “garbage codes”: vague or generic causes of death that are listed when the specific cause is unknown. Garbage codes make it difficult to track the toll of a disease over time or to look for geographical patterns in how people die. The data shown in the map above represents one research group’s effort to fill in these gaps. See our related article on patterns of death in the U.S. Black Belt. That group — the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation — designed a statistical model that uses demographic and epidemiological data to assign more specific causes of death to the records containing garbage codes in the National Vital Statistics System, which gathers death records (and other information such as births) from state and local jurisdictions into a national database. The institute also age-standardized the data so that places with larger populations of older people, who die at higher rates, do not have inflated numbers. The result is a set of more complete estimates of mortality across the country, one revealing regional and local variations in causes of death. Such regional trends are evident in the list of the 20 counties or parishes with the highest mortality rates. Rural Appalachia stands out; nine counties in Kentucky and three in West Virginia make the list. Rising cancer rates and increased deaths from substance abuse in Appalachia have kept mortality rates high there, even while overall mortality rates in the U.S. have gone down. After Appalachia, the region that fe Continue reading >>

Incidence And Mortality Rates And Clinical Characteristics Of Type 1 Diabetes Among Children And Young Adults In Cochabamba, Bolivia

Incidence And Mortality Rates And Clinical Characteristics Of Type 1 Diabetes Among Children And Young Adults In Cochabamba, Bolivia

Incidence and Mortality Rates and Clinical Characteristics of Type 1 Diabetes among Children and Young Adults in Cochabamba, Bolivia 1Centro Vivir con Diabetes, Av. Simn Lpez, No. 375, Cochabamba, Bolivia 2International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child Program, Glebe, NSW 2037, Australia 3NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia 4Diabetes NSW, Glebe, NSW 2037, Australia Correspondence should be addressed to Graham David Ogle ; [email protected] Received 29 May 2017; Revised 24 July 2017; Accepted 30 July 2017; Published 29 August 2017 Academic Editor: Konstantinos Papatheodorou Copyright 2017 Elizabeth Duarte Gmez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objectives. To determine incidence, mortality, and clinical status of youth with diabetes at the Centro Vivir con Diabetes, Cochabamba, Bolivia, with support from International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child Program. Methods. Incidence/mortality data analysis of all cases (<25 year (y)) diagnosed January 2005February 2017 and cross-sectional data (December 2015). Results. Over 12.2 years, 144 cases with type 1 diabetes (T1D) were diagnosed; 43.1% were male. Diagnosis age was 0.322.2 y; peak was 11-12 y. 11.1% were <5 y; 29.2%, 5<10 y; 43.1%, 10<15 y; 13.2%, 15<20 y; and 3.5%, 20<25 y. The youngest is being investigated for monogenic diabetes. Measured incidence in Cercado Province (Cochabamba Department) was 2.2/100,000 children < 15 y/y, with 80% ascertainment, giving total incidence of 2.7/100,000 children < 15 y/y. Two had died. Crude mortality rate was 2.3/1000 patient years. Cli Continue reading >>

Mortality Rates And The Causes Of Death Related To Diabetes Mellitus In Shanghai Songjiang District: An 11-year Retrospective Analysis Of Death Certificates

Mortality Rates And The Causes Of Death Related To Diabetes Mellitus In Shanghai Songjiang District: An 11-year Retrospective Analysis Of Death Certificates

Mortality rates and the causes of death related to diabetes mellitus in Shanghai Songjiang District: an 11-year retrospective analysis of death certificates # Zhiyuan Li , Wei Luo , Dajun Dai , Scott R. Weaver , Christine Stauber , Ruiyan Luo , and Hua Fu Shanghai Songjiang Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), North Xilin Road 1050, Songjiang District, Shanghai, 201620 China Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Yixueyuan Road 138, PO Box 248, Shanghai, 200032 China Shanghai Songjiang Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), North Xilin Road 1050, Songjiang District, Shanghai, 201620 China Shanghai Songjiang Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), North Xilin Road 1050, Songjiang District, Shanghai, 201620 China Shanghai Songjiang Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), North Xilin Road 1050, Songjiang District, Shanghai, 201620 China Shanghai Songjiang Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), North Xilin Road 1050, Songjiang District, Shanghai, 201620 China Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Yixueyuan Road 138, PO Box 248, Shanghai, 200032 China Department of Geosciences, Georgia State University, 24 Peachtree Center Avenue SE, Atlanta, GA 30302 USA School of Public Health, Georgia State University, 140 Decatur Street, Atlanta, GA 30302 USA Jiang Li, Email: [email protected]_gnaijiL . Received 2015 Mar 23; Accepted 2015 Sep 2. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit Continue reading >>

Mortality In People Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes At An Older Age: A Systematic Review

Mortality In People Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes At An Older Age: A Systematic Review

Objectives: to review all published observational studies reporting on all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes to determine the degree of increased mortality when diagnosed at an older age. Design: systematic literature search. Setting: the review included studies carried out in populations from Germany, United Kingdom, United States, Japan, Italy, Western Australia, Netherlands and Sweden. Measurements: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, National Research Register and Cochrane Reviews were systematically searched from 1975 to 2004. We identified observational studies that reported overall mortality for people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when they were over the age of 60, compared with a non-diabetic population. Outcome measures were expressed as risk ratios or relative risks. Results: among 14 eligible studies, one study reported reduced mortality for patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes over the age of 60, whereas another found virtually no increased risk of mortality. However, 7 of the 14 studies reported increased mortality in all patients diagnosed when older, and 5 studies for certain subgroups only. A meta-analysis showed the combined relative risks (with 95% CI) of increased mortality for men diagnosed between the ages of 60 and 70 to be 1.38 (1.08–1.76) and 1.13 (0.88–1.45) for men diagnosed aged 70 years or older. A similar pattern was found for the same age groups for women, with combined relative risks of 1.40 (1.10–1.79) and 1.19 (0.93–1.52) respectively. Conclusion: increased mortality associated with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at an older age is lower than that reported for the general older diabetic population. Objective: to investigate variations in the use of specialist palliative care (SPC) services for adult cancer patients, in r Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease And Increased Mortality Risk In Type 2 Diabetes

Kidney Disease And Increased Mortality Risk In Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Type 2 diabetes associates with increased risk of mortality, but how kidney disease contributes to this mortality risk among individuals with type 2 diabetes is not completely understood. Here, we examined 10-year cumulative mortality by diabetes and kidney disease status for 15,046 participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) by linking baseline data from NHANES III with the National Death Index. Kidney disease, defined as urinary albumin/creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g and/or estimated GFR ≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, was present in 9.4% and 42.3% of individuals without and with type 2 diabetes, respectively. Among people without diabetes or kidney disease (reference group), 10-year cumulative all-cause mortality was 7.7% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 7.0%–8.3%), standardized to population age, sex, and race. Among individuals with diabetes but without kidney disease, standardized mortality was 11.5% (95% CI, 7.9%–15.2%), representing an absolute risk difference with the reference group of 3.9% (95% CI, 0.1%–7.7%), adjusted for demographics, and 3.4% (95% CI, −0.3% to 7.0%) when further adjusted for smoking, BP, and cholesterol. Among individuals with both diabetes and kidney disease, standardized mortality was 31.1% (95% CI, 24.7%–37.5%), representing an absolute risk difference with the reference group of 23.4% (95% CI, 17.0%–29.9%), adjusted for demographics, and 23.4% (95% CI, 17.2%–29.6%) when further adjusted. We observed similar patterns for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, those with kidney disease predominantly account for the increased mortality observed in type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

The Dead In Bed Syndrome

The Dead In Bed Syndrome

Someone with type 1 diabetes is found dead in the morning in an undisturbed bed after having been observed in apparently good health the day before. No cause of death can be established. This is the typical situation of the "dead in bed" syndrome, a very tragic outcome which leaves the family with many unanswered questions: Why, when, how, could it have been avoided? After the first report from UK1 the observations have been confirmed from other countries.2,3 A number of young people with type 1 diabetes have been found dead in the morning without previous symptoms of illness, hyper- or hypoglycemia. The number of deaths of this kind per 10,000 patient years has been estimated to 2-6.4 For a population of 100,000 persons with diabetes, this represents 20-60 deaths per year or approximately 6% of all deaths in persons with diabetes aged less than 40 years.4 A relationship to human insulin1 or intensive insulin treatment2 has been postulated but does not seem likely.4 Autopsies have not revealed the cause of death. The diagnosis of hypoglycemia is difficult to confirm after death.5 There is however one case report where the person who died was wearing a retrospective (non-real-time) sensor, and the sensor reading demonstrated levels below 30 mg/dl (1.7 mmol/l) around the time of death (restrictions on reading glucose levels <40 mg/dl, 2.2 mmol/l, were removed by sensor manufacturer after the event), with at least 3 hours of severe hypoglycemia below <40 mg/dl, 2.2 mmol/l, before death.6 Another report using sensor tracings has shown a lag time of 2-4 hours before the onset of seizures when having severe hypoglycemia.7 In a recent review, clinical reports strongly suggest that nighttime hypoglycemia is a likely prerequisite of the event, but that the death is sudden and pr Continue reading >>

Mortality Rates Have Fallen Steadily In The U.s. And In Comparable Countries

Mortality Rates Have Fallen Steadily In The U.s. And In Comparable Countries

The U.S. has lower than average mortality rates for cancers but higher than average rates in the other causes of mortality. This collection of charts explores how mortality rates in the U.S. compare to similar OECD countries (those that are similarly large and wealthy based on GDP and GDP per capita). Break in series in 1987 and 1997 for Switzerland; in 1995 for Switzerland; in 1996 for Netherlands; in 1998 for Australia, Belgium, and Germany; in 1999 for United States; in 2000 for Canada and France; and in 2001 in the United Kingdom. All breaks in series coincide with changes in ICD coding. Canada did not report data in 2013 and 2014; pre- unification Germany did not report data from 1980-1989; United Kingdom did not report data in 2000; Australia did not report data in 2005. Those countries are not represented in the averages calculated for these years. The mortality rate (number of deaths per 100,000 people, adjusted for age differences across countries) has been falling in the U.S. and in comparable countries. For most of the leading causes of death, mortality rates are higher in the U.S. than in comparable countries Among the major causes of death, the U.S. has lower than average mortality rates for cancers and higher than average rates in the other categories relative to comparable countries. These categories accounted for nearly 88 percent of all deaths in the U.S. in 2013. The U.S. has a relatively high mortality rate for diseases of the circulatory system The U.S. mortality rate for diseases of the circulatory system, which includes heart diseases and stroke, is above the comparable country average. For ischaemic heart disease (e.g., heart attacks), which accounts for over 46 percent of the deaths in this category, the U.S. has the second highest mortality rate Continue reading >>

Mortality Rates And Diabetic Foot Ulcers Is It Time To Communicate Mortality Risk To Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulceration?

Mortality Rates And Diabetic Foot Ulcers Is It Time To Communicate Mortality Risk To Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulceration?

Abstract Five-year mortality rates after new-onset diabetic ulceration have been reported between 43% and 55% and up to 74% for patients with lower-extremity amputation. These rates are higher than those for several types of cancer including prostate, breast, colon, and Hodgkin's disease. These alarmingly high 5-year mortality rates should be addressed more aggressively by patients and providers alike. Cardiovascular diseases represent the major causal factor, and early preventive interventions to improve life expectancy in this most vulnerable patient cohort are essential. New-onset diabetic foot ulcers should be considered a marker for significantly increased mortality and should be aggressively managed locally, systemically, and psychologically. Discover the world's research 14+ million members 100+ million publications 700k+ research projects Join for free Download Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot: Facts And Figures

Diabetic Foot: Facts And Figures

Diabetes affects 30 million people in the US and more than 415 million people worldwide. Diabetesatlas.org/American Diabetes Association The top 10 diabetes nations International Diabetes Federation / Diabetesatlas.org Diabetes kills more people annually than breast cancer and AIDS combined. American Diabetes Association, 2009 Two thirds of all new cases of type 2 diabetes are diagnosed in low- and middle-income countries, such as Mexico, India, China and Egypt. Pharmacoeconomics, 2015 Pharmacoeconomics, 2015 If diabetes were a country, it would be the 3rd largest in the world 80% of people with diabetes are from low and middle income nations The number of people with diabetes is increasing in every single nation Half of people with diabetes don’t know they have it. American Diabetes Association / International Diabetes Federation, 2012 Quiet. Slow. Deadly. Expensive: Chronic Diseases Account for 75% of our Healthcare Costs. 25% of all medical care is consumed by 1% of the population and nearly 50% is consumed by 5%. AHRQ, 2013 1 Day with #Diabetes in USA: 5000 diagnosed, $670M, 280 lives, 200 limbs. We can do better. Today. American Diabetes Association, 2014 Seconds Count: Every 7 seconds someone dies from diabetes. Every 20 seconds someone is amputated. International Diabetes Federation / Diabetesatlas.org Armstrong, et al, Diabetes Care 2013 The cost of diabetic foot ulcers is greater than that of the five most costly forms of cancer The cost to heal a complex diabetic foot ulcer is between 3 months and 6 years’ salary depending on nationality Cavanagh, et al, Diabetes Metab Res Rev, 2012 Diabetic Foot Ulcer patients are twice as costly to US Medicare as those with diabetes alone Rice, et al, Diabetes Care, 2014 Inpatient care constitutes nearly two thirds of in Continue reading >>

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