diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Mortality Rate Canada

Mortality From Diabetes Mellitus, 2004 To 2008: A Multiple-cause-of-death Analysis

Mortality From Diabetes Mellitus, 2004 To 2008: A Multiple-cause-of-death Analysis

Jungwee Park and Paul A. Peters Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in Canada. It occurs when the body is either unable to sufficiently produce or properly use insulin. Insulin, a hormone secreted by beta cells in the pancreas, enables the cells of the body to absorb sugar from the bloodstream and use it an energy source.1 People with type 1 diabetes mellitus produce little or no insulin; in type 2 diabetes mellitus, the pancreas continues to make insulin, but the body develops resistance to its effects, resulting in an insulin deficiency. In 2008/2009, close to 2.4 million Canadians, about 7% of the population, were living with diagnosed diabetes.1 Although many of its complications are associated with mortality, diabetes mellitus itself is not usually reported as the primary cause of death.1 For example, it is a risk factor for vascular complications such as coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, kidney disease and nerve damage,2 which are often listed as the underlying cause on the death certificate rather than diabetes mellitus. In accordance with international conventions, a single underlying cause is identified as the disease or injury that initiated the train of events leading directly to death.3 But for conditions that are often accompanied by a number of comorbidities, there may be no direct etiologic chain to facilitate identification of a single underlying cause4,5; instead, a combination of multiple factors results in mortality. Thus, the choice of an underlying cause may obscure the contribution of chronic conditions like diabetes mellitus. To overcome this limitation, multiple cause-of-death statistics that include contributing causes as well as the underlying cause are used. Such data provide a better understanding o Continue reading >>

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Key Messages Nunavut is the only Canadian region to place at the top of the rankings—but its low mortality rate due to diabetes is likely a result of high premature mortality from other diseases. The prevalence of diabetes continues to increase; about 2 million Canadians suffer from it. Preventative measures such as an active lifestyle and healthy eating habits helps reduce the risks of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a global epidemic and, according to the International Diabetes Federation, “one of the most challenging health problems in the 21st century.” In 2013, diabetes accounted for about 5.1 million deaths worldwide.1 Globally, it is estimated that more than 382 million people suffer from diabetes; this number is expected to jump to over 592 million by 2035, if nothing is done.2 An estimated 316 million people worldwide have an impaired glucose tolerance—a precursor to diabetes. This number is projected to reach 471 million by 2035, or 8 per cent of the adult population.3 Diabetes has also shifted down a generation—from a disease of the elderly to one that affects those of working age or younger. According to the International Diabetes Federation, as a result of decreasing levels of physical activity and increasing obesity rates, type 2 diabetes in children has the potential to become a global public health issue.4 Diabetes is both a chronic disease and a major risk factor for other chronic diseases. Diabetes has the potential to be a heavy burden on Canada’s health care system, as common complications include heart disease and stroke, vision problems or blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage.5 Because of these complications, deaths associated with diabetes may often be attributed to other diseases. Therefore, diabetes prevalence rates ar Continue reading >>

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Key Messages Canada receives a “C” and ranks 15th out of 17 peer countries on mortality due to diabetes. Two million Canadians suffer from diabetes, a figure that is expected to increase to three million over the next decade. The prevalence of diabetes in Canada continues to increase. Putting mortality due to diabetes in context Diabetes is a global epidemic and, according to the International Diabetes Federation, “one of the most challenging health problems in the 21st century.” In 2011, diabetes accounted for about 4.6 million deaths worldwide.1 Globally, it is estimated that more than 350 million people suffer from diabetes; this number is expected to jump to over 550 million by 2030, if nothing is done.2 An estimated 280 million people worldwide have an impaired glucose tolerance—a precursor to diabetes. This number is projected to reach 398 million by 2030, or 7 per cent of the adult population.3 Diabetes has also shifted down a generation—from a disease of the elderly to one that affects those of working age or younger. According to the International Diabetes Federation, as a result of decreasing levels of physical activity and increasing obesity rates, type 2 diabetes in children has the potential to become a global public health issue.4 If you enjoyed this research, get regular updates by signing up to our monthly newsletter. Please enter your e-mail. Your e-mail was not in the correct format. It should be in the form [email protected] What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating, and sometimes fatal disease that occurs when there are problems with the production and use of insulin in the body, ultimately leading to high blood sugar levels. Long-term complications from diabetes include kidney disease, diminishing sight, loss of feeling in t Continue reading >>

What Bad Things Has The U.s Done?

What Bad Things Has The U.s Done?

Just a few off the top of my head, in recent history (since 1950s): Invaded other countries, declared war, and allowed civilians to die in the war that we caused for business interests (example: Iraq, when VP Cheney had business interests in oil) Drafted young men of color to get wounded and die in our wars without even protecting their right to vote (Black soldiers in Vietnam) Distribute propaganda in other countries against democratically elected leaders because those leaders didn’t suit American business interests (example: Jacobo Árbenz in Guatemala because he no longer allowed the United Fruit Company to control the country) Overthrown democratically elected leaders in other countries (for no other reason except they were too socialist for our taste) and installed our own puppet leaders (example: overthrow of Salvador Allende, the democratically elected President of Chile, and replaced him with Augusto Pinochet, a dictator that committed many human rights violations). Looked the other way when these puppet regimes, or regimes we have close business tied with, committed terrible human rights violations (example: El Mozate massacre in El Salvador, and we continue to do business with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) We have a health care system that allows Americans to suffer and die from diseases that are preventable and have treatments that are well-known how to manufacture, all because we prefer to prioritize the profits of Big Pharma over the lives of our people. (example: the average cost of insulin without insurance. In this day and age, people should not be dying from diabetes in our country but they do… The U.S. maternal mortality rate is several times over that of comparable countries. Of every 100,000 women who give birth, the number of American women who d Continue reading >>

Chapter 5: Diabetes In Canada: Facts And Figures From A Public Health Perspective – Youth And Children

Chapter 5: Diabetes In Canada: Facts And Figures From A Public Health Perspective – Youth And Children

Chapter 5 – Diabetes in children and youth Introduction Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among children and youth. In 2008/09, the CCDSS reported 3,287 new cases of diagnosed diabetes (including both type 1 and type 2) among Canadians aged one to 19 years, bringing the total number of cases in children and youth to 25,693 (representing a prevalence rate of 0.3%) (Chapter 1, Table 1-1). Historically, all cases of diabetes in young individuals were believed to be type 1 diabetes. However, for the last two decades, type 2 diabetes has been on the rise globally in this population. Currently, no population-based surveillance study has confirmed the ratio between the two types of the disease in children and youth in Canada. However, one study from British Columbia developed an algorithm to distinguish between type 1 and type 2 cases in administrative data, and estimated that approximately 90% of the cases among children and youth aged one to 19 years were of type 1 diabetes and 10% were of type 2 diabetes in 2006/07.1 As the rates of obesity increase among children and youth, the rates of type 2 diabetes also increase. Therefore, the ratio of type 1 to type 2 in this population is likely to be impacted.2 Research suggests that both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing worldwide in youth.3 As both forms of diabetes are lifelong diseases, the early onset of either type increases the risk of related complications later in life, with lifelong implications for those with the disease and their families, as well as for the health care system and the Canadian economy. Although it is currently only possible to prevent type 2 diabetes, optimal management of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is of primary importance to prevent negative consequences of either dise Continue reading >>

Mortality Trends In Patients With And Without Diabetes In Ontario, Canada And The Uk From 1996 To 2009: A Population-based Study.

Mortality Trends In Patients With And Without Diabetes In Ontario, Canada And The Uk From 1996 To 2009: A Population-based Study.

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to determine the contemporary rate ratio of mortality and changes over time in individuals with vs without diabetes. METHODS: Annual age- and sex-adjusted mortality rates were compared for adults (>20 years) with and without diabetes in Ontario, Canada, and the UK from January 1996 to December 2009 using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) and Ontario databases. The total number of individuals evaluated increased from 8,757,772 in 1996 to 12,696,305 in 2009. RESULTS: The excess risk of mortality for individuals with diabetes in both cohorts was significantly lower during later vs earlier years of the follow-up period (1996-2009). In Ontario the diabetes mortality rate ratio decreased from 1.90 (95% CI 1.86, 1.94) in 1996 to 1.51 (1.48, 1.54) in 2009, and in THIN from 2.14 (1.97, 2.32) to 1.65 (1.57, 1.72), respectively. In Ontario and THIN, the mortality rate ratios among diabetic patients in 2009 were 1.67 (1.61, 1.72) and 1.81 (1.68, 1.94) for those aged 65-74 years and 1.11 (1.10, 1.13) and 1.19 (1.14, 1.24) for those aged over 74 years, respectively. Corresponding rate ratios in Ontario and THIN were 2.45 (2.36, 2.54) and 2.64 (2.39, 2.89) for individuals aged 45-64 years, and 4.89 (4.35, 5.45) and 5.18 (3.73, 6.69) for those aged 20-44 years. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The excess risk of mortality in individuals with vs without diabetes has decreased over time in both Canada and the UK. This may be in part due to earlier detection and higher prevalence of early diabetes, as well as to improvements in diabetes care. Continue reading >>

Excess Prevalence Mortality Rates Of Diabetes Cardiovascular Disease Among South Asians: A Call To Action

Excess Prevalence Mortality Rates Of Diabetes Cardiovascular Disease Among South Asians: A Call To Action

According to the 2006 census, Canada's visible minority population is growing at a rate of 27%, 5 times faster than the 5% rate for the rest of the population (1). From 2001 to 2006, 60% of immigrants to Canada came from Asia. If current population and immigration trends continue, 1 in 3 Canadians will belong to a visible minority by 2031 (2). In 2006, South Asians surpassed Chinese to become Canada's largest visible minority group. Nearly 1.3 million Canadians in 2006 identified themselves as South Asian (i.e. from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka or Nepal), and this subpopulation is projected to reach between 3.2 and 4.1 million by 2031 (2). South Asians have high rates of diabetes and one of the highest rates of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the world (3). India, together with China and the Middle East, are now considered the "hot spots" of diabetes, with a projected doubling in incidence of the disease over the next 20 years (4). The prevalence of diabetes is conservatively estimated to be 12% in India and will continue to rise with urbanization (5). South Asian immigrants in diverse developed countries (United Kingdom [UK], United States [US], South Africa and Canada) are revealing similar temporal changes in the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes associated with Westernization (6). Emerging evidence suggests that obesity and diabetes are the principal drivers for the rising prevalence and mortality rates of CVD (7., 8.). Data from the Study of Health Assessment and Risk in Ethnic Groups (SHARE) confirm that Canadians of South Asian origin from urban centres have a higher prevalence of, and risk factors for, CVD than Canadians of European and Chinese descent (9), with similar findings observed in South Asians living in the UK and elsewhere (10 Continue reading >>

Death Rate For Diabetes Mellitus In Canada From 2000 To 2014 (per 100,000 Population)

Death Rate For Diabetes Mellitus In Canada From 2000 To 2014 (per 100,000 Population)

This statistic displays the age-standardized death rates in Canada from 2000 to 2014 for diabetes mellitus. In 2007, around 22.5 out of 100 thousand Canadians died from diabetes mellitus. In 2000, the death rate stood at almost 21.8 deaths per 100,000. Diabetes in Canada and the U.S. The death rate due to diabetes mellitus in Canada has fallen since 2000 from 21.8 per 100,000 population to 19.9 deaths per 100,000 population in 2014. Diabetes is considered one of the leading causes of death in Canada. In the United States, it was responsible for 21.3 deaths per 100,000 population in 2015, and caused almost 1.6 million deaths globally in 2015. Diabetes mellitus is due to an insufficient production of insulin within the pancreas or a lack of response from the body to the insulin that is produced. The most common type of diabetes mellitus is type II diabetes, which accounts for over 90 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Type II diabetes occurs when cells in the body are unresponsive to insulin and may lead to a decrease in insulin production as well. One of the greatest problems with type II diabetes is that it can lead to many different complications such as some types of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and even amputations. This type of diabetes is largely associated with overweight and obese populations and those who are physically inactive. It is also considered a preventable disease by maintaining healthy diets and balanced lifestyles. Health care expenditures to treat diabetes in the United States was about 320 billion U.S. dollars as of 2015, and in comparison, China, a country with a lower diabetes incidence but a much larger population, expended about 51 billion U.S. dollars. Continue reading >>

Mortality Rates Plummet Among Diabetes Sufferers

Mortality Rates Plummet Among Diabetes Sufferers

Open this photo in gallery: Diabetes has become remarkably less deadly over the past generation, new research reveals. In 2009, a Canadian living with diabetes had a life expectancy that was six years less than a comparable person without diabetes. In 1996, the diabetes sufferer would have had an 11-year reduction in life expectancy. "That's a big difference," Dr. Lorraine Lipscombe, a research scientist at the Women's College Research Institute in Toronto, said in an interview. "But people with diabetes still have a significant reduction in life expectancy." While the new study did not examine why mortality dropped, Lipscombe said it likely reflects a number of medical advances and societal changes. For example, screening for diabetes is more commonplace and treatment is more aggressive, particularly when it comes to blood pressure control. As well, the number of people who smoke has dropped, and treatments for heart disease have improved a lot. Diabetes, a disease in which the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body does not properly use the insulin it produces, is highly damaging to the heart. "We're seeing a lot fewer cardiovascular events in the patient population," Lipscombe said. "And when people do have a heart attack, we're a lot better at treating them." The new research, published Thursday in the medical journal Diabetologia, examined changes in the "excess risk of mortality" among patients with diabetes in Ontario and in the United Kingdom. In Ontario in 1996, a person living with diabetes was about 90 per cent more likely to die than a comparable person without diabetes. But 2009, that excess risk of mortality had fallen to 51 per cent. In the U.K., the excess rate of mortality fell to 65 per cent from 214 per cent during that same time period. Continue reading >>

Key Statisticsi 2016 2026

Key Statisticsi 2016 2026

Diabetes in Canada Diabetes and prediabetes prevalent cases (rate) 11 million (29%) 13.9 million (33%) Diabetes prevalent cases (rate) 3.5 million (9.2%) 4.9 million (11.6%) Cost of diabetes to health-care system $3.4 billion $5 billion 2006 to 2016: estimated increase in diabetes prevalence 72% 2016 to 2026: estimated increase in diabetes prevalence 41% Impact of diabetes: • Diabetes complications are associated with premature death. Diabetes reduces lifespan by 5–15 years. It is estimated that one of ten deaths in Canadian adults was attributable to diabetes in 2008–2009.1 • People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease and over 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population.1 • Diabetes contributes to 30% of strokes, 40% of heart attacks, 50% of kidney failure requiring dialysis, and 70% of nontraumatic lower limb amputations2 and is a leading cause of vision loss. • Thirty per cent (30%) of people with diabetes have clinically relevant depressive symptoms; individuals with depression have an approximately 60% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.3 • The risk of blindness in people with diabetes is up to 25 times higher than those without diabetes.4 Diabetes is the leading cause of acquired blindness in Canadians under the age of 50.5 Diabetic retinopathy affects 500,000 Canadians.6 • Foot ulceration affects an estimated 15%–25% of people with diabetes in their lifetime.7 One-third of amputations in 2011–2012 were performed on people reporting a diabetic foot wound.8 • Some populations are at higher Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mortality Risk Declining

Type 2 Diabetes Mortality Risk Declining

Death rates among people with Type 2 diabetes have fallen sharply in Canada and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s, researchers say. The excess mortality risk among those with diabetes compared with those without the condition decreased over time in both Canada and the U.K., Dr. Lorraine Lipscombe, an endocrinologist at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, said in Thursday's issue of Diabetologia, the Journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. The excess risk of mortality estimated during 2009 was 51 per cent in Ontario compared with 90 per cent in 1996. "The hypothesis is that the mortality rates for diabetes have gone down in part because we're taking better care of our diabetes patients," Lipscombe said. The risk declined by a similar degree for men and women over the study period. In 2008-09, nearly 2.4 million Canadians aged one year and older were living with diagnosed diabetes, either Type 1 or Type 2, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. The researchers cautioned it's possible there are now more newly diagnosed patients who have had diabetes for a shorter period, since recent guidelines focus on screening high-risk groups. In the last 10 years, guidelines have stressed aggressive control of blood pressure, cholesterol and hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, so patients may now be receiving more intensive care. The prevalence of diabetes was higher in Ontario than in the U.K., where the risk fell to 65 per cent in 2009 compared with 114 per cent in 1996. It's not clear why, but factors such as screening programs, ethnicity, eating habits or physical activity patterns could be contributing, the researchers speculated. Ontario’s population was also relatively constant over time while the U.K. group increased. Factors that in Continue reading >>

Mortality Rates: Report From The National Diabetes Surveillance System: Diabetes In Canada, 2009

Mortality Rates: Report From The National Diabetes Surveillance System: Diabetes In Canada, 2009

Overall mortality rates were twice as high for individuals with diabetes compared to individuals without diabetes. The differences in mortality rates for people with and without diabetes were higher for the younger age groups. The mortality rates were 4 to 6 times higher than those without diabetes for adults aged 20 to 44. While for adults aged 45 to 79, the rates were 2 to 3 times higher for individuals with diabetes (Figure 9). Diabetes significantly shortens life expectancy for all ages. For, the 20 to 39 year age groups, women with diagnosed diabetes had, on average, about a 9-year reduction in life expectancy, while men had about an 8-year reduction (Figure 10). Both girls and boys with diagnosed diabetes in the 1 to 19 year age groups had about a 10-year reduction in life expectancy (Figure 10). This is likely an underestimation, as studies in the United States showed that having type 1 diabetes reduced the life expectancy by about 15 years.2 Younger adults (aged 20 to 49) with diagnosed diabetes had almost twice as many visits to family physicians (Figure 11) and 3 to 4 times as many visits to specialists (Figure 12) than individuals without diabetes. Even in the oldest age groups, individuals with diagnosed diabetes visited physicians and specialists about 1.5 times more often than individuals without diabetes. Adults with diagnosed diabetes had more days in hospital than individuals without diabetes (Figure 13). For hospitalized adults with diagnosed diabetes, aged 20 to 29 and 35 to 49 years, the number of hospital days was 5 to 6 times and almost 5 times (respectively) the number of hospital days for adults without diabetes. While adults older than 50 years had 2 to 4 times the number of hospital days than their counterparts without diabetes (Figure 13). Chi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Key Statistics[1] 2015 2025 Estimated diabetes prevalence (n/%) 3.4 million/9.3% 5 million/12.1% Estimated prediabetes prevalence in Canada (n/%) (age 20+) 5.7 million/22.1% 6.4 million/23.2% Estimated diabetes prevalence increase (%) 44% from 2015-2025 Estimated diabetes cost increase (%) 25% from 2015-2025 Impact of diabetes Diabetes complications are associated with premature death. It is estimated that one of ten deaths in Canadian adults was attributable to diabetes in 2008/09.[2] People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease and over 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population.[3] Thirty per cent of people with diabetes have clinically relevant depressive symptoms; individuals with depression have an approximately 60% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.3 Foot ulceration affects an estimated 15-25% of people with diabetes. One-third of amputations in 2011-2012 were performed on people reporting a diabetic foot wound.[4] Some populations are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes, such as those of South Asian, Asian, African, Hispanic or Aboriginal descent, those who are overweight, older or have low income. Diabetes rates are 3-5 times higher in First Nations, a situation compounded by barriers to care for Aboriginal people.3 Fifty-seven percent of Canadians with diabetes reported they cannot adhere to prescribed treatment due to the high out-of-pocket cost of needed medications, devices and supplies. The average cost for these supports is >3% of income or >$1,500.[5] As a result of stigma or fear of stigma, 37% of Canadians with type 2 diabetes surveyed by the Cana Continue reading >>

Trends In Diabetes Prevalence, Incidence, And Mortality In Ontario, Canada 1995–2005: A Population-based Study

Trends In Diabetes Prevalence, Incidence, And Mortality In Ontario, Canada 1995–2005: A Population-based Study

Summary The prevalence of diabetes has been increasing greatly, but WHO's predicted 39% rise in the global rate of diabetes from 2000 to 2030 might be an underestimate. We aimed to assess diabetes trends in Ontario, Canada. Using population-based data, including a validated diabetes database from the province of Ontario, Canada, we examined trends in diabetes prevalence and mortality from 1995 to 2005, and incidence from 1997 to 2003, in adults aged 20 years or older. Age-adjusted and sex-adjusted diabetes prevalence increased by 69%, from 5·2% in a population of 7 908 562 in 1995 to 8·8% of 9 276 945 in 2005. Prevalence increased by 27% from 6·9% in a population of 8 457 720 in 2000 to 8·8% of 9 276 945 in 2005. Although prevalence rates have remained higher in people aged 50 years or older (7·1% of 3 675 554) than in those aged 20–49 years (3·5% of 5 601 391), rates increased to a greater extent in the younger population (94% vs 63%, p<0·0001). A 31% increase occurred in yearly incidence over 6 years, from 6·6 per 1000 in 1997 to 8·2 per 1000 in 2003. The adjusted mortality rate in people with diabetes fell by 25% from 1995 to 2005. The prevalence of diabetes in Ontario, Canada increased substantially during the past 10 years, and by 2005 already exceeded the global rate that was predicted for 2030. This increase in prevalence is attributable to both rising incidence and declining mortality. Effective public-health interventions aimed at diabetes prevention are needed, as well as improved resources to manage the greater number of people living longer with the disease. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes