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Diabetes Mood Disorders

Diabetes And Anger

Diabetes And Anger

Tweet Anger can be extremely destructive emotion with a detrimental impact on our physiology as well as our mental and emotional well being. What is anger? Anger is a strong feeling of displeasure, resentment and hostility that often arises in response to a perceived wrong doing. Anger initiates the stress response within the body causing blood sugar levels to rise, heart rate and blood pressure to increase. It is normal for people with diabetes to experience anger, often questioning why it is them with diabetes whilst other people are healthy. Why should I be mindful of anger? Anger frequently contributes to diabetes burnout, a person’s anger may encourage them to seek ‘freedom’ from the condition and neglect their self-management. It must be noted that anger is a natural emotion that has its uses in human existence, yet if not controlled, can lead to negative effects on health and social relationships. How can I manage anger? Mindfulness based approaches are recognised as an effective and lasting means of aiding the management of anger. Research has shown that by becoming aware of the triggers as well as the emotional, mental and physical impact of anger, an individual is able to recognise and respond rather than react to triggers which may have initiated an automatic reaction. [35] Why does anger need controlling? Anger if left un-addressed has the power to become hugely destructive, having a negative impact on mental and physical health including reduced glycaemia control. Patterns of anger expression have been associated with maladaptive alterations in cortisol secretion (sometimes referred to as the stress hormone), immune functioning, and surgical recovery. [44] Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood Continue reading >>

Researchers Uncover Link Between Mood Disorders And Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers Uncover Link Between Mood Disorders And Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers uncover link between mood disorders and type 2 diabetes It is well documented that individuals with type 2 diabetes have a high risk of developing depression due to the demands of managing their health. Careful meal planning and regular blood glucose testing may consume hours of one's day and cause a person to become overwhelmed. Now, a recent study presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association indicated that mood disorders may precede diabetes in many cases, especially among Latinos, according to an article published in the Los Angeles Times. According to the newspaper, Latino populations have a higher prevalence of diabetes, depression and anxiety than other ethnicities. You may be interested in these related articles: 8 Lies People with Diabetes Should Never Tell Their Doctor In order to determine which illness is more likely to be diagnosed first among these individuals, the investigators evaluated the medical records of 129 Latinos who lived in California. The study's results showed that among men and women who had diabetes and depression, 54 percent of males developed diabetes before the mental illness, compared to 24 percent who were diagnosed with depression first. Similarly, a total of 59 percent of women developed diabetes first, while 29 were depressed before they became insulin resistant, the news provider reported. The findings also indicated that anxiety preceded diabetes more often than depression, since 45 percent of men and 39 percent of women experienced anxiety first. "Poor motivation, poor eating habits, and lack of impulse control in patients with mood and anxiety symptoms could be considered as contributing factors for the development of metabolic syndrome and diabetes," said the study's authors, quoted by the Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I am on two different types of insulin, NovoLog and Levemir (insulin detemir). Can diabetes have any bearing on mood swings or sudden “bad mood episodes”? Continue reading >>

Are Diabetics Angry...?

Are Diabetics Angry...?

(See Also: Diabetes and Anger -- Is there a Deeper Connection?) This angry diabetic has been really bewildered for the past few weeks with many new and personal challenges... As we know, life's problems do not stop at diabetes, or any other chronic illness, nor do they care if we're having to juggle other things. In fact, in the storm of life... sometimes when it rains, it just pours. (I need to buy a raincoat.) So, I thought... why not take a little time to address a common, and often overlooked, issue with diabetes? Anger. In the past few weeks, my blog has registered many, many Google searches for "anger and diabetes," "do diabetics suffer from anger," "do diabetics need anger management," etc. I fear many of these folks might be family members really wanting to understand, and care for their loved ones... or maybe folks just wanting to understand themselves a little better. Before I get a little further into the discussion, I want to add that while the emotions we experience through the ups and downs of illness, and life, are perfectly normal... this blog post is in NO WAY a justification for aggression, violence, or abuse. It might be an EXPLANATION of a course of events, but in the end... we are responsible for our own selves, and how we manage our health, and our emotions. Got that? Okay... :) Diabetes is a PERVASIVE disease... Now, in order to make some of kind of sense of the emotions a person with diabetes might feel, we need to understand one thing: Diabetes is a PERVASIVE life change. It is one of the most pervasive life changes an 'afflicted' person will ever have to face. While it may not seem as such in the beginning stages (especially for type 2, and often during a "honeymoon phase" for a type 1), with time, an individual will soon become painfully aware Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Patterns of co-occurrence of diabetes and psychiatric disorders Comorbidity of diabetes and psychiatric disorders can present in different patterns. First, the two can present as independent conditions with no apparent direct connection. In such a scenario both are outcome of independent and parallel pathogenic pathways. Second, the course of diabetes can be complicated by emergence of psychiatric disorders. In such cases diabetes contributes to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Various biological and psychological factors mediate the emergence of psychiatric disorders in such context. Third, certain psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia act as significant independent risk factors for development of diabetes. Fourth, there could be an overlap between the clinical presentation of hypoglycemic and ketoacidosis episodes and conditions such as panic attacks. Fifth, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes could emerge as a side effect of the medications used for psychiatric disorders. Treatment of psychiatric disorders could influence diabetes care in other ways also as discussed in subsequent sections [Box 1]. Diabetes and psychiatric disorders interact in other ways as well. Certain substances of abuse such as tobacco and alcohol can alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral hypoglycemic agents. Moreover, the presence of a comorbid psychiatric disorder like depression could interfere with the management of diabetes by influencing treatment adherence. Similarly certain disorders such as phobia of needles and injections can present difficulties with investigations and treatment processes such as blood glucose testing and insulin injection. Also patients with psychiatric disorders are less likely to seek treatment. Such delays would postpone detection Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Often Precedes Mood Disorders

Type 2 Diabetes Often Precedes Mood Disorders

Home Type 2 Diabetes News and Research Type 2 diabetes often precedes mood disorders Type 2 diabetes and mood disorders such as depression and anxiety are known to co-occur at high rates. However, doctors have been unsure whether one condition causes the other or if a single underlying factor is responsible for both ailments. In order to get to the bottom of this phenomenon, a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego reviewed the medical records of a group of 129 Hispanic individuals who had been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Los Angeles Times. The findings of their study were presented at the American Psychiatric Association's annual meeting. Latinos are known to have higher rates of type 2 diabetes than the general population. Additionally, co-occurring mood disorders are common among these individuals. This made this group of patients an ideal population for studying the relationship between mood disorders and type 2 diabetes. You may be interested in these related articles: Neural stem cell transplants may improve type 1 diabetes treatments The results of the study showed that diabetes was diagnosed first in 54 percent of men with both conditions, while depression was the initial diagnosis of 24 percent of men. Of women with both conditions, 59 percent were first discovered to have diabetes, while 29 percent were first diagnosed with depression. The researchers told the news source that it is unclear why there is this association between the two conditions, but said that their findings show that there is a strong need to monitor individuals with type 2 diabetes for future mental health issues, as the metabolic condition appears to precede mood disorders. This recommendation echoes advice from the American Diabetes Association, wh Continue reading >>

Depression, Diabetes Share Common Risk Factors, Treatment Approaches

Depression, Diabetes Share Common Risk Factors, Treatment Approaches

Depression, Diabetes Share Common Risk Factors, Treatment Approaches Depression, Diabetes Share Common Risk Factors, Treatment Approaches The onset of depression and diabetes are appearing earlier in the population. Depression and Type 2 diabetes have a lot in common. Both disorders are strongly influenced by lifestyle factors such as sleep and diet, and both are associated with higher rates of inflammation and mortality. Each disorder is also a risk factor for the other. Having depression increases the risk of developing diabetes, and having diabetes increases the risk for developing depression, Dolores Malaspina, MD, a psychiatrist and epidemiologist at New York University School of Medicine, told Psychiatry Advisor. A study published earlier this year in the International Journal of Endocrinology, which was co-authored by Malaspina, is one of many showing a connection between the two diseases.1 The researchers analyzed the data of 14,373 subjects from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), each of whom completed a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression screening and had their glucose functioning assessed via the hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) test. According to the results, approximately 38% of participants with major depressive disorder had elevated HbA1c levels, of which many of them were unaware. Conversely, it has been estimated that depression affects 20% of people with diabetes,2 and the combination leads to poorer diabetes management and elevated mortality rates. Research published in PLOS ONE in 2013 found that, in people with diabetes, depression is associated with 50% increased risk of mortality.2 Many of the symptoms and behaviors observed in depression are known to be risk factors for diabetes, including poor sleep, changes in Continue reading >>

Do Blood Sugar Levels Affect Mood Swings?

Do Blood Sugar Levels Affect Mood Swings?

Blood sugar levels that become too high or too low can cause a variety of health problems and can even be life-threatening. Mild, moderate and severe blood sugar fluctuations can also affect your mood and behavior. If your blood sugar levels tend to spike and drop and you notice changes, you need to speak with your physician to learn how to keep your blood sugar levels in check. Video of the Day After a meal, the food you eat is broken down into glucose and either used right away for energy or stored for use later on. Glucose is also made by the liver and pancreas. In order for the cells to use glucose, the hormone insulin must be present. If you have diabetes your body either does not produce insulin or cannot use it properly. Without enough insulin your blood sugar levels can get too high. Non-diabetics can also experience fluctuations in blood sugar levels when skipping meals as a side effect of medications or from various other illnesses. Blood sugar levels are considered high if they climb to greater than 100mg/dL, and diabetes is diagnosed when the level reaches 126 mg/dL or more, according to MedlinePlus. A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL is considered low. Both high and low blood glucose levels can cause a variety of symptoms, including mood swings. Your brain, like all areas of the body, relies on a steady supply of glucose to function properly. If you take too much insulin, skip meals, take certain medications, are extremely physically active or drink too much alcohol, your blood sugar levels can drop too low. A low blood sugar level is called hypoglycemia. Mild cases of low blood sugar can cause you to feel nervous or anxious, while more severe cases can lead to feeling irritable or tired, notes the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. Along with moo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Disorders

Diabetes And Mood Disorders

People today are familiar with diabetes, albeit broadly, and that it mainly consists of type 1 and type 2. That is merely the tip of the iceberg. Apart from it taking a serious toll on physical health, this disorder also can affect your emotions, which in turn can wreak havoc on your diabetes control. Extremes in blood-sugar levels can cause significant mood changes, and research suggests that frequent changes in blood-sugar levels also can affect mood and quality of life for those with diabetes. This includes depression due to diabetes and diabetic mood swings. Lets learn more about this. Evidence from the diabetes studies across the world also suggests that diabetes can disturb your mental health. It is known to be associated with various mood disorders given below. Approximately 25% of Indian diabetics are found to have depression due to diabetes. Type II diabetics are up to 2 times more prone to develop major depression than general population. Depression due to diabetes further impacts its complications by causing alterations in hormones and glucose transport mechanism as well as increased activation of immune-inflammatory pathway. Diabetics are over three times at higher risk for anxiety than the general population. Long term stress related to the presence of chronic illness like diabetes or short term stress due to self-care activities, needle phobia or fear of hypoglycaemia can predispose them to acute or chronic anxiety disorder. Anxiety in diabetics can be associated with poor sugar control. This is a condition characterized by altered sensorium or confusion and is linked to the acute episodes of hypoglycaemia or diabetic ketoacidosis. People with diabetes are at about one and a half times higher risk of decline in cognitive (ability to think) function compar Continue reading >>

Resilience And Quality Of Life In Mood Disorders And Diabetes: Correlations With Personality Traits, Coping And Self-esteem - Sciencedirect

Resilience And Quality Of Life In Mood Disorders And Diabetes: Correlations With Personality Traits, Coping And Self-esteem - Sciencedirect

Volume 30, Supplement 1 , 2831 March 2015, Page 1952 Topic: EPV46 e-Poster 46: Promotion of Mental Health Resilience and Quality of Life in Mood Disorders and Diabetes: Correlations with Personality Traits, Coping and Self-esteem Author links open overlay panel A.Feggia C.Gramagliaa C.Guerrieroa P.Zeppegnoa Get rights and content The topic of resilience is obtaining a growing interest in psychiatric research. Resilience refers to positive adaptation or ability to maintain or regain mental health despite experiencing adversity. It is a dynamic, context- and time-specific process, and may vary across all life domains. Pathways to resilience are multiple and reciprocally interacting, and include biological, psychological, social and dispositional attributes. These factors play an important role both in psychiatric and somatic chronic disorders. Our aim is to evaluate and compare resilience in mood disorder patients and diabetic ones. We also mean to investigate personality features, coping abilities, self-esteem and quality of life, and their possible correlation with resilience in these two populations. Mood disorder and diabetic patients will be recruited at the Psychiatry Institute (SC Psichiatria) and Endocrinology Ward (SC Endocrinologia), respectively. Socio-demographic data will be gathered and patients will be asked to fill the following self-administered scales: Resilience Scale for Adult (RSA), Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Inventory Brief (Brief Cope), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), Paykel List Of Stressful Events, Temperamental and Character Inventory (TCI), Short Form 36 (SF-36). Data collection is ongoing. We expect that the findings from this research may allow to develop strategies to support patients with chronic diseases, both as far as Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Emotions & Blood-sugar Levels: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

Emotions & Blood-sugar Levels: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

All July, the Joslin Blog is highlighting stories about taking care of yourself emotionally. This story was originally posted on Feb. 18, 2011. This guest post is written by by John Zrebiec, L.I.C.S.W., Director of Behavioral Health at Joslin, and Gail Musen, Ph.D., Investigator in the Section on Clinical, Behavioral & Outcomes Research. Diabetes can affect both your physical and mental health. A diagnosis of diabetes certainly adds a huge emotional weight, which can often manifest as depression, anxiety or some other emotional issue. The same goes for the stress of managing diabetes 24/7. Recently, Joslin researchers discovered a link between high levels of glutamate (a neurotransmitter in the brain that is produced by glucose) to symptoms of depression in people with type 1 diabetes. The study showed increased levels of glutamate in the prefrontal area of the brains of such people — an area associated with both higher-level thinking and regulation of emotions. At the same time, the study showed a link between high levels of glutamate and poor glucose control, , and lower scores on some cognitive tests. We believe that if health care practitioners emphasize good glucose control, it may help reduce the probability that patients with diabetes will also become depressed. Clinical depression is more than the normal response of feeling down for a couple of hours or days. It is more dramatic — taking you down further and longer. A psychologist would diagnose clinical depression if a patient has five or more of these symptoms for at least two weeks. At least one of these symptoms has to be depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure. Depressed mood (feeling sad or empty) most of the day, nearly every day Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, a Continue reading >>

Helping A Loved One With Diabetes

Helping A Loved One With Diabetes

Diabetes can be a demanding disease to manage. People who have the condition must constantly watch what they eat, check their blood sugar levels regularly, and take medication to keep those levels steady. If you’re close to someone who has diabetes, there are ways you can help. Learn about the disease. There are lots of myths and wrong ideas about diabetes. For example, it’s not true that a major sweet tooth can lead to the condition, or that it’s unsafe for people who have it to exercise. Learn how diabetes works, how to prevent emergencies or complications, and other information so you can be useful. Maybe ask your loved one if you can tag along to a doctor’s appointment. Make it a team effort. A diabetes diagnosis is a chance for the whole household to start some healthy habits. Get everyone to get onboard with nutritious meals, quitting smoking, and staying active. Know when to step back. Remember that the person who has diabetes is responsible for managing it, not you. Don’t second-guess the care plan or try to police meals or snacks. Living with diabetes is hard work, and encouragement and support are better than unwanted advice or, worse, scolding. Help ease stress. Too much stress can raise blood sugar levels and make it harder to control diabetes. But managing the condition can be stressful. Encourage your loved one to talk about feelings and frustrations. Try things together like meditating, walking, gardening, or watching a funny movie. Expect mood swings. Swings in blood sugar can make someone jittery, confused, anxious, or irritable. Better blood sugar control can help avoid these ups and downs. Offer emotional support, and encourage your loved one to join a support group or talk about professional counseling if you think that might help. Talk ope Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Mood?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Mood?

My husband has type 2 diabetes, which is now being controlled by medicine. I find that he is sometimes particularly irritable or even mean, which is very out of character for him. Is this common with type 2 diabetes, or with high or low readings? — Sally, Florida It is great that you are seeking a better understanding of your husband’s illness. Diabetes is a disease that not only affects individuals but also those close to them. As a result, those who have good family support in the care of their diabetes do much better in managing their illness. There are a few reasons for behavioral changes like those you see in your husband among people with diabetes. One is the effect of abnormally low glucose levels in the bloodstream. The other reason is depression, which can be triggered by the diagnosis of diabetes, the burden of daily management, and fear of complications. Low glucose levels can cause symptoms including impaired judgment, anxiety, moodiness, belligerence, fatigue, apathy, confusion, dizziness, blurred vision, and a lack of coordination. I would advise your husband to check his sugar levels at the times when he is irritable. If his mood is indeed due to low glucose levels, the symptoms will improve if he raises his blood sugar, for example, by drinking orange juice or taking glucose tablets. It is also important to consult with his doctor to adjust his medicines or dietary intake. On the other hand, your husband’s irritability can be a manifestation of depression. Many people with depression are undiagnosed and thus do not receive the necessary counseling and treatment. Also, depression symptoms vary from person to person, which can make it difficult to diagnose. Signs such as lack of sleep, overeating or lack of appetite, poor concentration, and other sym Continue reading >>

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