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Diabetes Month Canada 2018

List Of Month-long Observances

List Of Month-long Observances

The following is a list of notable month-long observances, recurrent months that are used by various governments, groups and organizations to raise awareness of an issue, commemorate a group or event, or celebrate something. January[edit] Dental Awareness Month Dry January (United Kingdom) Human Trafficking Prevention Month (United States)[1] International Creativity Month National Mentoring Month (United States)[2] Tamil Heritage Month (Canada) [3][4] Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month (United States) Stalking Awareness Month [5] February[edit] Black History Month in United States of America Black History Month Canada Marfan Awareness Month American Heart Month (United States)[6] Gang Prevention Awareness Month Oral Hygiene Awareness Month Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month Eating Disorder Awareness Month Turner syndrome awareness month [7] March[edit] Brain Injury Awareness Month[8] International Black Women In Jazz & The Arts Month Irish-American Heritage Month[9] National Disabilities Month National Nutrition Month [10] National Reading Month [11] Women's History Month[12][13][14] Youth Art Month National Athletic Training Month Endometriosis Awareness Month National Music in Our Schools Month April[edit] Autism Awareness Month (United States) National Occupational Therapy Month Black Women's History Month Confederate History Month (United States)* Parkinsons Awareness Month Financial Literacy Month[15] Jazz Appreciation Month Mathematics Awareness Month National Child Abuse Prevention Month[16][17] National Deaf History Month, March 13-April 15[18][19] National Growing Naturals Day National Medical Laboratory Professionals Week (NMLPW) National Poetry Month National Volunteer Month Records and Information Management Month[20] Sexual Assault Awareness Continue reading >>

The Sweet News About Diabetes And Life Insurance

The Sweet News About Diabetes And Life Insurance

While October 31st usually brings an influx of sweets into the house, November 1st ushers in a timely reminder not to overindulge in all those Hallowe’en treats sitting in the kitchen drawer. That’s because November is Diabetes Awareness Month — a serious call to arms to take stock of your health so as not to join the skyrocketing number of Canadians living with this serious disease. The statistics issued by Diabetes Canada say it all: 11 million Canadians are living with diabetes or prediabetes Every 3 minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed with diabetes 1.5 million people are living with the disease and don’t even know it With numbers like these, chances are that diabetes affects you or someone you know. Know that the rich and famous aren’t immune either: celebrities including Tom Hanks, Larry King, Salma Hayek, Nick Jonas and Drew Carey are all living proof that diabetes can strike anyone at any time. So who is more likely to come down with this disease that comes in not one type, but two? (Type 1 is a total lack of insulin; Type 2 is the body’s inability to use insulin effectively) Well, certain factors can predict whether you’re more at risk: Diabetes runs in your family You’re overweight You’re a member of a high-risk ethnic group You had gestational diabetes Your cholesterol levels and/or triglyceride levels are outside the accepted norm You have high blood pressure If any of these factors describe you, a simple blood test can tell you where you stand. Routine diabetes screening normally starts around age 45. If you don’t have any of these risk factors, then know what signs and symptoms to look for. While Type 2 Diabetes usually doesn’t have any symptoms, they may occur when blood sugar levels are abnormally high and are similar to Type 1 sy Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

by Monica Curtis | Nov 13, 2017 | News and Events | TORONTO, Ont. More than 10 million Canadians live with diabetes or prediabetes and 20 Canadians are diagnosed with diabetes every hour. Thats why the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) joins the international community in recognizing World Diabetes Day on November 14, an official United Nations day. In Canada, diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, says Rick Blickstead, President and CEO of the CDA. World Diabetes Day reminds us of the impact this disease has on the health and well-being of people living with diabetes. Diabetes is the cause of 30 per cent of strokes, 40 per cent of heart attacks, 50 per cent of kidney failure requiring dialysis and 70 per cent of non-traumatic amputations, as well as being a leading cause of amputations and blindness. We need to get ahead of this crisis with education, research, improved treatments, and prevention. The CDA is working on each of these fronts to support the health of Canadians. November 14 is also a day to acknowledge the incredible contribution of our very own Sir Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin. Held on his birthday, World Diabetes Day is an opportunity to look at his legacy. Banting is a unique figure in Canadian history. His idea led to the discovery that changed the world. Before insulin, diabetes was a death sentence. While insulin is not a cure, it has helped millions of people around the world to live longer, healthier lives, says Grant Maltman, curator of the Banting House National Historic Site of Canada, CDA. The CDA is a proud steward of the birthplace of insulin, where people from around the world come to pay their respects, keep Bantings spirit alive and recognize our work in helping people affected by diabetes while searching for a cu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Current January 2018

Diabetes Current January 2018

Effective January 1, we are very excited to welcome Dr. Jan Hux and John Reidy to the roles of President and Acting CEO at Diabetes Canada and to welcome former President and CEO Rick Blickstead to his new role at the National Diabetes Trust. Read our official announcement for details Dr. Jan Hux on the Diabetes Canada Podcast In the latest episode of the Diabetes Canada Podcast, Dr. Jan Hux talks about her new role as President of Diabetes Canada, as well as the importance of population impact. Subscribe today and never miss an episode Every day, Diabetes Canada partners with thousands of volunteers, health-care professionals, advocates, and companies to End Diabetes. Our 2018 National Volunteer Awards honour the people and groups who make a special contribution. Thank you for joining us throughout 2017 for our free webinar series! You can now watch all 12 of these engaging and informative webinars on our YouTube channel. Watch or rewatch your favourites for free This months Healthy Living Calendar Recipe The secret sauce in this kale, beet and chickpea power bowl is the amazing dressing! It also makes a great dip for grilled vegetables, prawns or chicken. Download your free copy of the 2018 calendar Exercise is good for you. Vitamin D is good for you. New research suggests that combining the two might be even better. The most recent issue of Diabetes Dialogue examines this exciting new study. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month Highlights Need For Action

Diabetes Awareness Month Highlights Need For Action

TORONTO, Ont. – November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) is taking this opportunity to drive diabetes awareness, as the disease has reached epidemic proportions in Canada. “With a staggering one in three Canadians already living with diabetes or prediabetes, including an estimated 1.5 million with undiagnosed diabetes, we must take action now to stop the growth and impact of this disease,” says Rick Blickstead, President and CEO of the CDA. “Diabetes Awareness Month and World Diabetes Day are times to shine a spotlight on diabetes, educate Canadians about the disease, and help all of us find out our level of risk for type 2 diabetes so we can take action.” As part of this effort, the CDA’s current awareness campaign (in partnership with Sun Life Financial and supported by Novo Nordisk) encourages everyone to visit DiabetesTest.ca to take the online CANRISK test and learn their risk level for developing type 2 diabetes. The awareness campaign takes a playful look at the misconceptions people often have about type 2 diabetes, and is a reminder that you may be at risk even if you don’t fit the stereotypical model of someone with type 2 diabetes. The CDA has also launched the 21 Day Challenge to End Diabetes, encouraging Canadians to form a new, healthy habit for 21 days and challenge others to do the same. By taking part in this fundraiser, Canadians will improve their health and help end diabetes by raising vital funds to support diabetes research, education and support programs. “There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes, some of which we can’t control. Regular exercise and a healthy diet can make a difference in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes,” says Continue reading >>

Canadas Gift To The World: A Cure For Diabetes Mellitus

Canadas Gift To The World: A Cure For Diabetes Mellitus

A look at the past, the present, and the promising future of treating diabetes By Sunitha Chari, Biology and Life Science co-editor Think of some of your favourite foods: pizza, pasta, breador perhaps you have a sweet tooth and enjoy desserts and chocolates. Ever wondered why these foods are so appealing? The answer is sugar, particularly glucose , which acts as our cells fuel. It circulates through our bodies as blood sugar and is taken up by our cells to produce energy or stored for later use. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates glucoses entry into the cells. Without insulin, glucose remains in the blood, resulting in high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia). Excess glucose is expelled in the urine, but, over time, high blood glucose levels can give rise to a chronic condition known as diabetes . If untreated, diabetes can cause serious health complications including cardiovascular disease , blindness ( diabetic retinopathy ), kidney failure ( diabetic nephropathy ), and neurological damage ( diabetic neuropathy ), and can even lead to lower-limb amputations. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1, or juvenile-onset diabetes , is an autoimmune disorder that destroys the insulin-secreting beta cells in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas. It affects a minority of the diabetic patient population, but is the focus of most research, since in the absence of insulin produced by the body, patients rely on daily insulin injections, and managing the symptoms requires careful monitoring of blood glucose levels. Type 2, or adult-onset diabetes , is a more common condition caused when there is either insufficient insulin production or when the cells of the body are unable to use the insulin produced by the pancreas. In its early stages, type Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month And Were #countingonu!

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month And Were #countingonu!

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and Were #countingonU! NATIONAL, on behalf of our client, JDRF, is launching our Diabetes by Numbers social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter throughout November. Our aim is to raise awareness and funds for type 1 diabetes (T1D) the most severe form of diabetes and its complications. JDRF knows that when it comes to diabetes management, its all about the numbers: target blood glucose levels, number of needles; growing prevalence and cost. People living with diabetes are faced with a lifetime of constantly monitoring their blood sugar levels, some pricking their finger up to eight times a day and injecting insulin up to four times daily. Thats 1,460 needle pricks in a year! Help spread the word by sharing a photo with a blue circle on your index finger the international sign for Diabetes Awareness Month and upload your pic to JDRF Canadas Facebook page and/or Tweet @JDRF_Canada using the hashtag #countingonU For more than 40 years, JDRF has been a global leader in the search for an end to T1D through both research funding and advocacy. This Diabetes Awareness Month, support the JDRFs mission to help those living with T1D live healthier, easier, and safer lives. Were #countingonU! Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

>2 million: Number of Canadians who have been diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes 6 million: Estimated number of Canadians who have prediabetes $1,000 to $15,000: Direct costs that a person with diabetes can expect to spend on medications and supplies in a year $12.2 billion: Estimated cost of diabetes to the Canadian health-care system this year 40: Age after which most people are typically diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 30: Number of minutes of moderate exercise per day that reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes by 58% when combined with a loss of 5% to 7% total body weight 41,500: Annual number of deaths in which diabetes is a contributing factor 60%: Percentage of people with type 2 diabetes who will develop vision loss (diabetic retinopathy) during the first 20 years they have the disease 15%: Percentage of Canadians with diabetes who have a major depressive disorder 63%: Percentage of adults with diabetes who have also been diagnosed with hypertension 50%: Percentage of adults with diabetes who self-monitor their blood glucose daily 9%: Percentage of adults with diabetes who never self-monitor their blood glucose 2006: Year the UN recognized diabetes as a global threat and designated November 14 World Diabetes Day Sources: Canadian Diabetes Association, Public Health Agency of Canada, Canadian Institute for Health Information Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

Ottawa/Fraser Valley – Every November, Diabetes Canada celebrate Diabetes Awareness Month and the 11 million Canadians who live with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes or prediabetes. This is an opportunity to acknowledge the hard work that goes into managing this disease and to raise awareness about the serious risks and complications that can come with it. Rick Blickstead, the President & CEO of Diabetes Canadansaid in a rlease that this year, Diabetes Canada is asking all Canadians to make a difference in the lives of people living with diabetes. More information can be found here. Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November is Diabetes awareness month. Across the country, there are events happening to raise awareness about Diabetes and its impact on Canadians. 1 in 3 Canadians is living with diabetes or pre-diabetes, yet awareness of risk and complications are still low ( Diabetes Canada , 2019). Image courtesy of Rocky Mountain Analytical Diabetes is a serious health problem across the developed world. High blood sugar associated with Diabetes can result in a wide range of complications if not managed properly. Foot problems, kidney disease, eye disease, heart disease and nerve damage are common amongst people with chronic high blood sugar. Properly managing your blood sugar and taking preventative steps can drastically reduce your risk for complications. YourSoleSciencePedorthistis one of many healthcare providers that can help manage your risk factors for Diabetes related complications. Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating disease in which the body either cannot produce insulin or cannot properly use the insulin that it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates sugar in the bloodstream. Diabetes leads to high blood sugar levels, which can damage various systems in the body including the organs, blood vessels and nerves. The body needs insulin to properly break down sugar to use as an energy source. Diabetes can cause nerve damage and blood flow problems in the feet and lower limbs. As a result, people with diabetes are at a higher risk for developing complications from minor injuries such as blisters or cuts. Nerve damage reduces sensations in the feet, making it difficult to feel when an injury has occurred. Poor blood flow makes it difficult for the body to heal from small cuts or wounds. These impairments in combination can cause a small injury to become a much lar Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and Nov. 14 is World Diabetes Day. As many as one in three Canadians lives with diabetes. If left untreated, diabetes causes health problems and death. However, effective treatment of diabetes was not developed until the early 20th century when Sir Frederick Banting, a Canadian medical scientist and physician, discovered insulin. Banting was a remarkable Canadian and a fascinating character. Born on Nov. 14, 1891, he grew up on a farm in rural Ontario. In 1916, Banting earned bachelor of medicine degree at the University of Toronto and joined the Canadian Army Medical Corps, serving in France where he was ultimately wounded. In 1919, he was awarded a Military Cross for heroism under fire. Subscribers Log in below to continue reading, not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 60 day free trial. We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27 per article. For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription: Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs! We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27 per article. For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription: Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs! We hope you have enjoyed your trial! Because you read so much, we recommend an All Access Digital Membership: Not ready to commit? No problem! We have you covered with our no-risk and commitment-free Read Now Pay Later membership. Simpl Continue reading >>

Calendar Of Health Promotion Days

Calendar Of Health Promotion Days

Events marked with an asterisk (*) take place on the same day every year. These events are either promoted by recognized health organizations or recognized in the professional health community. Not all websites and events listed are celebrated or endorsed by Health Canada. You can submit a health promotion awareness event on behalf of your organization. Events are removed from the calendar once the date has passed, unless you mention next year's event. If your annual event was removed, you can submit it again when the next occasion is announced. The information you provide through this survey is collected under the authority of the Department of Employment and Social Development Act (DESDA) for the purpose of measuring the performance of Canada.ca and continually improving the website. Your participation is voluntary. Please do not include sensitive personal information in the message box, such as your name, address, Social Insurance Number, personal finances, medical or work history or any other information by which you or anyone else can be identified by your comments or views. Any personal information collected will be administered in accordance with the Department of Employment and Social Development Act , the Privacy Act and other applicable privacy laws governing the protection of personal information under the control of the Department of Employment and Social Development. Survey responses will not be attributed to individuals. If you wish to obtain information related to this survey, you may submit a request to the Department of Employment and Social Development pursuant to the Access to Information Act . Instructions for making a request are provided in the publication InfoSource , copies of which are located in local Service Canada Centres. You have the right Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

Recognizing World Diabetes Day: Keeping Diabetes Simple... Getting It Right

Recognizing World Diabetes Day: Keeping Diabetes Simple... Getting It Right

Recognizing World Diabetes Day: Keeping diabetes simple... getting it right Dr. Jan Hux, Chief Science Officer, Canadian Diabetes Association Published Friday, November 14, 2014 6:51AM EST Last Updated Friday, November 14, 2014 6:53AM EST When I practiced medicine, I loved making complex medical information understandable for patients and their families. For those with type 2 diabetes, that meant encouraging them to reduce time in front of computer and TV screens, become more active and eat a healthier diet. I sought to empower patients by emphasizing the things over which they had some control. However, the unintended consequence of this message has been a misunderstanding about the causes of type 2 diabetes, contributing to stigmatization of those living with it. The reality is that type 2 diabetes is a complex condition with roots in genetics, the environment and individual behavioural choices. Approximately 90 per cent of Canadians with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, where the body either cannot properly use or make enough insulin. The role of genes is clear when you examine patterns across countries, ethnicities and families. It runs in families, and most people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have at least one relative with it as well. It is also more common among our First Nations and people of South Asian, South East Asian or Caribbean origin. For some who carry a strong genetic risk, no amount of physical fitness or healthy eating will protect them from developing diabetes. A second factor in the growing diabetes epidemic is the role of the environment, specifically things such as the walkability of neighbourhoods and having reliable and affordable access to healthy foods and health-promoting facilities and services. For those who are at high risk for diabetes, Continue reading >>

New Name, New Campaign For The Canadian Diabetes Association

New Name, New Campaign For The Canadian Diabetes Association

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – The Canadian Diabetes Association has changed its name, kicking off a fresh campaign to bring awareness to a disease that affects about one-third of Canadians. The association, now known as Diabetes Canada, has launched “End Diabetes” with a music video highlighting a need for support for people living with the disease. Rogers Media uses cookies for personalization, to customize its online advertisements, and for other purposes. Learn more or change your cookie preferences. Rogers Media supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles. By continuing to use our service, you agree to our use of cookies. We use cookies (why?) You can change cookie preferences. Continued site use signifies consent. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400% Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadow Font FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps DefaultsDone Create a new password We've sent an email with instructions to create a new password. Your existing password has no Continue reading >>

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