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Diabetes Metallic Taste In Mouth Chronic Headache

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Fortamet is available in generic form. Common side effects of Fortamet include headache, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting, stomach upset or pain, diarrhea, gas, weakness, or a metallic taste in the mouth. Fortamet does not usually cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Low blood sugar may occur if Fortamet is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Fortamet including shortness of breath, swelling or rapid weight gain, fever, body aches, or flu symptoms. Fortamet should be taken once daily. Dosage is individualized based on effectiveness and tolerance. The maximum recommended daily dose is 2500 mg. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that raise blood sugar, such as: isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that lower blood sugar, such as: alcohol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid. It may also interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine or ranitidine, amiloride or triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or Continue reading >>

What Causes A Metallic Taste In Your Mouth?

What Causes A Metallic Taste In Your Mouth?

What Causes a Metallic Taste in Your Mouth? Having a metallic taste in your mouth on occasion is not necessarily uncommon or a cause for concern. The medical term for this condition is parageusia. This article discusses several conditions that can cause this and when you should worry. It may also be helpful to know that taste is directly related to your sense of smell, so conditions that cause changes in your sense of smell can also lead to a metallic taste in your mouth. Blood in your mouth can cause a metallic taste because it is so high in iron. Therefore any kind of recent injury that causes bleeding, even biting your tongue, can cause a metallic taste in your mouth. This is also true of recent surgeries,such as having your wisdom teeth removed or a tonsillectomy . As your wounds heal the metallic taste in your mouth will also disappear. Conditions such as gingivitis or periodontitis that often result from poor oral hygiene (foregoing regular dental check ups, not brushing or flossing regularly, etc...) can cause a metallic taste in your mouth. The metallic taste is often caused by bleeding from the gums. While the metallic taste in your mouth is probably just an annoyance, gum disease can be serious and should be treated to avoid complications such as tooth loss. You should make an appointment with your dentist if you suspect that gum disease may be causing the metallic taste in your mouth. Medication Side Effects or Cancer Treatment Hundreds of commonly used medications can cause you to have a metallic taste in your mouth, here is a list of some types of medications that are known to cause this side effect: Vitamins that contain heavy metals such as copper or zinc Medications used to treat diabetes, including Metformin In addition to chemotherapy, other cancer tr Continue reading >>

Burning Mouth Syndrome

Burning Mouth Syndrome

Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a burning sensation in the mouth with no underlying dental or medical cause.[3] No related signs of disease are found in the mouth.[3] People with burning mouth syndrome may also have a dry mouth sensation where no cause can be found such as reduced salivary flow, tingling in the mouth, or an altered taste or smell.[3] A burning sensation in the mouth can be a symptom of another disease when local or systemic factors are found to be implicated, and this is not considered to be burning mouth syndrome,[3][needs update][needs update] which is a syndrome of medically unexplained symptoms.[1] The International Association for the Study of Pain defines burning mouth syndrome as "a distinctive nosological entity characterized by unremitting oral burning or similar pain in the absence of detectable mucosal changes",[1] and "burning pain in the tongue or other oral mucous membranes",[7] and the International Headache Society defines it as "an intra-oral burning sensation for which no medical or dental cause can be found".[6] Due to insufficient evidence it is unclear if effective treatments exist.[8] Signs and symptoms[edit] By definition, BMS has no signs. Sometimes affected persons will attribute the symptoms to sores in the mouth, but these are in fact normal anatomic structures (e.g. lingual papillae, varices).[9] Symptoms of BMS are variable, but the typical clinical picture is given below, considered according to the Socrates pain assessment method (see table). If clinical signs are visible, then another explanation for the burning sensation may be present. Erythema (redness) and edema (swelling) of papillae on the tip of the tongue may be a sign that the tongue is being habitually pressed against the teeth. The number and size of filiform p Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Levels & Funny Taste In The Mouth

Low Blood Sugar Levels & Funny Taste In The Mouth

When you consume carbohydrates in things like breads, pasta, fruit and sweets, your body converts them to glucose, a type of sugar. Your body then burns the glucose to create energy. Simple carbohydrates such as fruits, refined sugar and white rice are converted to energy quickly and are used up just as quickly. Complex carbohydrates like whole grains give you longer-lasting energy and leave you feeling full longer. You should try to consume more complex than simple carbohydrates. Your body needs a steady diet of carbohydrates because it doesn't store them like it does fat. If you haven't consumed enough carbohydrates to keep your blood glucose up, that's known as having low blood sugar or hypoclycemia. When that happens, your body begins burning fat for energy. When your body burns fat for energy, the fat breaks down and creates chemicals called ketones. This is called ketosis. A byproduct of ketones is a chemical called acetone. Your body gets rid of the acetone in your body by breathing it out, which is why you may have a funny taste in your mouth. Your breath may smell funny to others when you're experiencing ketosis as well. Some people describe the taste and smell as a fruity or sweet taste, while others say it tastes metallic. Who Experiences Ketosis People with diabetes who experience a drop in blood glucose and insulin often experience ketosis; in this case it's known as diabetic ketoacidosis. If you are experiencing diabetic ketosis it's important to eat or take a glucose tablet as soon as possible and call your doctor or an ambulance if your condition doesn't improve. People who are following a weight loss diet low in carbohydrates and high in protein also frequently experience ketosis as their bodies burn off the fat they're trying to lose. Ketosis may be se Continue reading >>

What Is Your Body Trying To Tell You?

What Is Your Body Trying To Tell You?

Bags under your eyes? Feeling dizzy? Recurrent mouth ulcers or odd muscle cramps? They may be your body's way of warning you that something is wrong. ADRIAN LEE reports... WARNING SIGNS: You should listen to your body Its one of the oldest medical adages: listen to your body. Our bodieshave many ways of communicating when something is wrong but, too often,we dismiss early warning signs, particularly when they appear trivialor dont interfere with our lives. Pain isthe most obvious indicator that all is not well. Its purpose is to tryto protect the body from further damage. Sometimes well try to silencethe warning by treating it with a painkiller or some other remedy,without dealing with the real root of the problem. But thats not the only way that the body signals a problem. Measuringyour weight, waist size, temperature, blood pressure and pulse rateoccasionally are all good ways of listening. Sudden changes could be an indicator that something is wrong. If youbecome aware of an unusual symptom, which persists for more than a fewdays, its worth having it checked out by a professional. Nail biting can be a sign of mineral deficiency There will probably be nothing seriously wrong, or youll just have tomake a few improvements to your diet or lifestyle. But medical historyis littered with cases of patients who ignored their bodys own earlywarnings only to discover later that it was the first sign of a healthproblem. Dr Debashis Singh, a London GP,says: There are many symptoms and signs that people may find trivialbut can often provide the doctor with clues to a possible underlyingillness. At medical school we aretaught to start examining a patient by looking at their hands to findclues about what may be causing them problems. Even the shape and condition of the fingernails Continue reading >>

Parageusia - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Parageusia - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Kelan L. Thomas, Shadi Doroudgar, in Side Effects of Drugs Annual , 2017 Metallic taste is an acute reversible side effect of lithium therapy in up to 20% of patients, but persistent dysgeusia and hyposmia after discontinuing lithium is rare. De Coo and Haan report a 55-year-old man who was prescribed lithium for chronic cluster headache prophylaxis and developed an unpleasantly strange taste, along with diminished smell, about a week after initiation. The patient had already been taking verapamil 480mg/day and sodium valproate 2000mg/day, but due to a high frequency of cluster headaches, the lithium 800mg/day was added. He reported a metallic taste after 1 week, complaining that his taste was altered for coffee and chocolate and that he could taste creamy, spicy, sweet, salty, and sour foods only minimally. He also reported a diminished sense of smell, complaining that he could no longer detect gas or perfume odors and he noticed a chemical smell perception for foods like fried meat and onions. Serum lithium level was only 0.35mmol/L 13 days after starting lithium 800mg/day, but he decided to discontinue the medication after about 3 weeks of therapy due to these taste and smell disturbances. He reported that the metallic taste quickly disappeared after discontinuation, but the impaired sense of taste and smell actually increased for several weeks before stabilizing. In a follow-up visit 9 months later, his dysgeusia and hyposmia had still not improved. This is the first case report of long-term smell and taste disturbances after discontinuing lithium according to authors, since all previous cases reported a return to normal taste and smell within days following lithium discontinuation [15A]. Diana C. Brown, in Clinical Pharmacology (Eleventh Edition) , 2012 Patients v Continue reading >>

Why Is There A Metallic Taste In My Mouth?

Why Is There A Metallic Taste In My Mouth?

Taste, one of the five senses, is a combination of various sensations that tell the brain how something tastes. Along with thousands of sensory organs called taste buds and taste papillae on the tongue, smell, texture, and temperature also play large roles in taste. Someone with a stuffy nose may not be able to enjoy their favorite meal because an important part in creating that taste is impaired. With the information the tongue sends to the brain, the brain sorts taste into five basic categories: sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and savory. It's a common mistake that taste buds only register certain tastes on certain regions of the tongue. Because there are many factors involved in the sense of taste, taste disorders can be a result of various different conditions or bodily imbalances. Metallic taste, or dysgeusia, can occur as the body responds to a foreign substance. It can also be a warning sign of other health problems. What causes a metallic taste? There are a number of common things that can cause a metallic taste. Some are more serious than others but most can be resolved easily or will go away on their own. Metallic taste in someone who is otherwise healthy isn't usually cause for alarm, says Dr. Michael Rabovsky, a family medicine physician at the Cleveland Clinic. Here is a list of common causes behind metallic taste: Poor oral health Those who don't brush or floss regularly may experience a metallic taste due to gingivitis, periodontitis, or tooth infection. These issues can cause people to bleed after they brush or floss, sometimes resulting in metallic taste. These issues can also cause more serious infections in the teeth and gums. Dentists can give a prescription drug to clear up infections, after which the metallic taste should go away. Regular dental cleani Continue reading >>

Fruity Odor On Breath, Metallic Taste In Mouth And Unusual Taste In Mouth

Fruity Odor On Breath, Metallic Taste In Mouth And Unusual Taste In Mouth

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms fruity odor on breath, metallic taste in mouth and unusual taste in mouth including Diabetic ketoacidosis, Medication reaction or side-effect, and Diabetes, type 1. There are 5 conditions associated with fruity odor on breath, metallic taste in mouth and unusual taste in mouth. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include dry mouth, excessive thirst and urination, and more. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Diabetes, type 1 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Antibiotic use Antibiotics can cause stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, itching, rashes and dizziness. Poisoning Poisoning can cause nausea, vomiting, drooling, dry mouth, changes in pupil size, and more. Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

11 Warning Signs Of Hypoglycemia That You Should Never Ignore

11 Warning Signs Of Hypoglycemia That You Should Never Ignore

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is something you may have heard of before, but may not know quite exactly what it is. Although it's most common in people with diabetes, it can occur for other reasons as well, and there are distinct warning signs of hypoglycemia that you can look out for. Low blood sugar can cause both short-term and longer-term complications, making it important you know what bodily changes could signify the condition. "Hypoglycemia typically relates to a blood sugar less than 60 for most people," says Dr. Heather Bartlett over email. "However, some people that are unknown diabetics or are pre-diabetic may be living at a higher blood sugar all the time, above normal, so even a drop to what is considered normal for most people could provoke a symptom of hypoglycemia." In addition to diabetes, hypoglycemia can be caused by diet, certain medications, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and more, according to medlineplus.com. Discovering signs of hypoglycemia can help you get treated for any underlying medical issues and prevent further damage. If you're feeling off and think your blood sugar might be to blame, watch out for these 11 warning signs that could mean you're hypoglycemic. Fatigue Pexels If you feel exceptionally tired all the time, your blood sugar may be to blame. When your blood sugar levels plummet, it leaves you feeling fatigued and sleepy, even throughout the day, according to universityhealthnews.com. Irritability & Anxiety Pexels When not enough glucose crosses the cell membrane of brain cells, it can cause a deterioration in a person's mental status. This could result in severe mood swings or anxiety, or it could even be something as mild as general irritability or feeling easily annoyed, according to everydayhealth.com. Continue reading >>

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

How To Treat Dry Mouth From Diabetes

Xerostomia is an ominous sounding name for a fairly common condition suffered by approximately 20% of the population, one that most people tend to underestimate, a dry mouth. In essence, having a dry mouth means the body is not producing enough saliva, which helps the mouth stay clean while removing harmful bacteria that can cause cavities and other painful infections in the mouth. Saliva neutralizes the acid in the mouth and is an important part of the digestive process as it provides the moisture needed to chew and swallow food. Dry Mouth Causes There are many causes of dry mouth, such as not drinking enough liquid during the day, smoking, and sleeping with your mouth open, among others. Dry mouth can also be caused by certain types of medication, such ADHD medicine, anti-histamines, antidepressants, sleep medications, and narcotics. When this is the case, the problem tends to disappear once the underlying cause is removed, meaning that a dry mouth is usually nothing more than a temporary problem with an easy fix. However, for individuals suffering from diabetes, having a dry mouth can be more than just a mild annoyance. Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes A dry mouth can exacerbate the side effects of diabetes, which will then lead to an increase in glucose levels, wreaking havoc on the body. A dry mouth is not only a symptom of high blood sugar, but it can also be the cause of it. Having a dry mouth, especially as a diabetic, can lead to rampant tooth decay, which means blood sugar increases as the body tries, and fails, to fight infection. A dry mouth can also lead to loss of sleep and an altered sense of taste, a condition that presents with a metallic or sour taste in the mouth. Treatments for Dry Mouth Caused by Diabetes Because of the harmful effects of having a dry m Continue reading >>

8 Possible Causes For That Metallic Taste In Your Mouth

8 Possible Causes For That Metallic Taste In Your Mouth

Does your mouth have the taste of old pennies? The condition is more common than you might think. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy A metallic taste can indicate serious illness, such as kidney or liver problems, undiagnosed diabetes or certain cancers . But these reasons are not common and usually are accompanied by other symptoms. If you are otherwise healthy, the cause for that metallic tang typically is benign, says family medicine physician Michael Rabovsky, MD . Dr. Rabovsky is Chairman of the Department of Family Medicine and the Vice Chairman of the Medicine Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. If a metallic taste in your mouth is your only complaint, the cause might be one of several, including prescription drugs or a medicalcondition. Here, according to Dr. Rabovsky, are eight causes of a metallic taste in your mouth. Poor oral hygiene If you dont brush and floss regularly, the resultcan beteeth and gum problems such as gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth infection.These infections can be cleared up with a prescription from your dentist. The metal taste typically goes away after the infection is gone. Prescription drugs These medicines include antibiotics such as tetracycline; the gout medicine allopurinol; lithium, which is used to treat certain psychiatric conditions; and some cardiac medications. Your body absorbs the medicine and it comes out in the saliva. Also, medicines that can cause a dry mouth, such as antidepressants, can be a culprit. These can affect your taste because they close your taste buds. Over-the-counter vitamins or medicines Multivitamins with heavy metals (such as copper, zinc or chromium) or cold Continue reading >>

Sarcoidosis: Mystery Illness Poleaxed Me And Perplexed My Doctors - Telegraph

Sarcoidosis: Mystery Illness Poleaxed Me And Perplexed My Doctors - Telegraph

Mystery illness poleaxed me and perplexed my doctors One moment Richard Preston was a healthy, active 44-year-old man, the next he could barely lift a carrier bag. Worse, nobody could work out what was wrong with him. A South African-Israeli scientist is trying to build a software version of the human brain. It was on the opening day of the Beijing Olympics in August 2008 that I started to feel really ill. I had had a dull headache and an upset stomach for a couple of days before, with an odd metallic taste in my mouth, but by that morning the symptoms had developed to the point where I needed paracetamol and an Imodium to get out of the house. That was my first mistake. I would have been better off in bed, but as an assistant editor I was on a rota to edit this newspaper on what looked likely to be one of the more exciting days of the year, with the opening ceremony of the Olympics to watch and Russia clashing with Georgia over South Ossetia. And it was a Friday, so I thought I would have the weekend to recover. Next morning, I woke with a raging thirst, intense pressure in the back of my head and a very strange sensation in my feet a spongy feeling that was to be with me for the best part of the next year. When I walked more than a few yards, the pressure in my head increased, my mouth went dry and my feet felt as though I had just walked through a deep puddle with shoes and socks on: soggy, disconnected, something like the sensation I remember having with concussion. I wasnt likely to collapse but behaved, after a very short walk, like a car running out of petrol: I would slow to a shuffle and then simply have to stop. I seemed to have no adrenaline to get me moving again. Ban bad fats and cut salt to save 40,000 lives a year, says Nice My reaction to this was, at f Continue reading >>

10 Signs Of Kidney Disease

10 Signs Of Kidney Disease

Many people who have chronic kidney disease don't know it, because the early signs can be very subtle. It can take many years to go from chronic kidney disease (CKD) to kidney failure. What Causes Kidney Disease? Diabetes and high blood pressure are the leading causes of kidney disease. These conditions cause about 70 percent of kidney failure cases. A person is also at risk if they have heart disease or close relative who has kidney disease. Early stages have no signs or symptoms. The only way to know if your elderly parent is experiencing kidney problems is to get checked. Kidney disease does not go away. It may get worse over time and can lead to kidney failure. Once these organs fail, the only options are dialysis or a kidney transplant. This disease can be treated. The sooner you know your parent has it, the sooner you can take steps to keep their kidneys healthy longer. Here are the top signs and symptoms of kidney disease to look for. 1. Changes in Urination Waking up at night to urinate Urinating more frequently than usual Urine that is foamy or bubbly Urinating less often, or in smaller amounts than usual with dark colored urine Blood in the urine A feeling or pressure while urinating Difficulty urinating 2. Swelling Failing kidneys don't remove extra fluid. As a result, the fluid builds up in the body causing swelling in the legs, ankles, feet, face or hands. 3. Fatigue When the kidneys are healthy, they make a hormone called erythropoietin that tells the body to make oxygen-carrying red blood cells. As the kidneys fail, they make less erythropoietin. With fewer red blood cells to carry oxygen, the muscles and brain become tired very quickly. This condition is known as anemia. 4. Feeling Cold Anemia can make a person feel cold all the time, even in a warm room Continue reading >>

What’s Causing A Sweet Taste In My Mouth?

What’s Causing A Sweet Taste In My Mouth?

What is this condition? Sweetness is one of at least five basic tastes detected by the tongue’s taste buds. Others include sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and a balanced flavor called umami. Normally you’ll only taste sweetness after eating something that contains sugar. This could be something more natural, like honey or fruit, or something processed, like ice cream. Some medical conditions can cause a person to experience a sweet taste in their mouth even if they haven’t eaten something sweet. Continue reading to learn more. Doctors are still learning more about the causes of this unusual symptom. However, some causes appear to include: Metabolic problems, such as diabetes, ketosis, or a thyroid disorder. Metabolic disorders can affect the body’s ability to taste, causing a background sweet taste in the mouth and large preference for very sweet-tasting foods. Neurological problems, such as stroke, seizure disorder, or epilepsy. A sweet taste in the mouth can be an early symptom of neurological issues. Viruses that attack the body’s ability to smell. Disruptions in the body’s olfactory system — the system that allows the body to smell — can result in a sweet taste in the mouth. Infection in the sinuses, nose, and throat. Certain bacteria, especially pseudomonas, can cause a sweet taste in the mouth. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Stomach acid backs up into the throat and mouth, causing a sweet taste. Small cell carcinoma in the lung. A sweet taste is an early symptom of this condition. Pregnancy. Many women experience a strange taste in their mouth in the early stages of pregnancy. Some women might describe it as sweet or metallic. These conditions cause a sweet taste in the mouth by affecting the body’s sensory, or nervous, system. This is Continue reading >>

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