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Diabetes Memory Loss Reversible

Could Diabetes Trigger Dementia? People With Type 2 Suffer 'memory Loss And Declining Decision-making Skills'

Could Diabetes Trigger Dementia? People With Type 2 Suffer 'memory Loss And Declining Decision-making Skills'

People with type 2 diabetes lose brain power as their ability to regulate blood flow drops, research suggests. A study by experts at Harvard Medical School suggests that the impact can be seen in memory and cognition tests - with the decrease in thinking skills dropping over just two years. Some 3.5 million people in Britain are thought to have type two diabetes - an increase of 62 per cent in the last nine years. The dramatic increase in the disease, which now affects one in every 16 adults in the country, is linked to spiralling rates of obesity and lack of exercise. The US researchers tracked 40 people over two years, and found a significant decrease in cognitive power, which impacted their ability to cook and bathe themselves. Study leader Dr Vera Novak, whose work was published in the journal Neurology, said: ‘Normal blood flow regulation allows the brain to redistribute blood to areas of the brain that have increased activity while performing certain tasks. ‘People with type two diabetes have impaired blood flow regulation. ‘Our results suggest that diabetes and high blood sugar impose a chronic negative effect on cognitive and decision-making skills.’ The study involved 40 people with an average age of 66. Of those, 19 had type two diabetes and 21 did not have diabetes. At the beginning of the study the participants were tested for cognition and memory, given MRI scans to look at brain volume and blood flow, and blood tests to measure control of blood sugar and inflammation. After two years, they were tested again – and those with diabetes showed marked decreases in their ability to regulate blood flow in the brain. They also had lower scores on several tests of memory and thinking skills - and found it harder to carry out daily tasks such as bathing an Continue reading >>

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

Q: “My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” A: The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day. Statistics are grim. 10 percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death. Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen. Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'Significantly Reversed Memory Loss' in Mice With Alzheimer's A drug developed for type 2 diabetes has " significantly reversed memory loss " in mice with Alzheimer's disease, and researchers now want to test it on humans. The treatment is exciting for scientists because it works by protecting the brain cells attacked by Alzheimer's disease in three separate ways, rather than relying on a single approach. And seeing as the drug has already been tested and approved for use in humans, it's something that could hit the market a lot faster than other experimental treatment options. The results have only been seen in mice so far, but the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," said senior author ChristianHlscher of Lancaster University in the UK. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's," said Doug Brown from UK organisation, Alzheimer's Society. "It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Previous research had already established a link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's - type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's, and it also appears to make the disease progress more rapidly. This could be a result of insulin not getting to the cells properly - insulin is a growth factor which is known to protect brain cells, and insulin resistance has been observed in Alzheimer's disease brains, as well as being the biological mechanism behind type 2 diabetes. So researchers have been investigating wh Continue reading >>

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

10 Drugs That May Cause Memory Loss

10 Drugs That May Cause Memory Loss

En español l For a long time doctors dismissed forgetfulness and mental confusion as a normal part of aging. But scientists now know that memory loss as you get older is by no means inevitable. Indeed, the brain can grow new brain cells and reshape their connections throughout life. Most people are familiar with at least some of the things that can impair memory, including alcohol and drug abuse, heavy cigarette smoking, head injuries, stroke, sleep deprivation, severe stress, vitamin B12 deficiency, and illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. But what many people don't realize is that many commonly prescribed drugs also can interfere with memory. Here are 10 of the top types of offenders. 1. Antianxiety drugs (Benzodiazepines) Why they are prescribed: Benzodiazepines are used to treat a variety of anxiety disorders, agitation, delirium and muscle spasms, and to prevent seizures. Because benzodiazepines have a sedative effect, they are sometimes used to treat insomnia and the anxiety that can accompany depression. Examples: Alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), flurazepam (Dalmane), lorazepam (Ativan), midazolam (Versed), quazepam (Doral), temazepam (Restoril) and triazolam (Halcion). How they can cause memory loss: Benzodiazepines dampen activity in key parts of the brain, including those involved in the transfer of events from short-term to long-term memory. Indeed, benzodiazepines are used in anesthesia for this very reason. When they're added to the anesthesiologist's cocktail of meds, patients rarely remember any unpleasantness from a procedure. Midazolam (Versed) has particularly marked amnesic properties. Alternatives: Benzodiazepines should be prescribed only rarely in older adults, in my judgmen Continue reading >>

Memory Loss: When To Seek Help

Memory Loss: When To Seek Help

Many medical problems can cause memory loss or other dementia-like symptoms. Most of these conditions can be treated. Your doctor can screen you for conditions that cause reversible memory impairment. Possible causes of reversible memory loss include: Medications. Certain medications or a combination of medications can cause forgetfulness or confusion. Minor head trauma or injury. A head injury from a fall or accident even if you don't lose consciousness can cause memory problems. Emotional disorders. Stress, anxiety or depression can cause forgetfulness, confusion, difficulty concentrating and other problems that disrupt daily activities. Alcoholism. Chronic alcoholism can seriously impair mental abilities. Alcohol can also cause memory loss by interacting with medications. Vitamin B-12 deficiency. Vitamin B-12 helps maintain healthy nerve cells and red blood cells. A vitamin B-12 deficiency common in older adults can cause memory problems. Hypothyroidism. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) can result in forgetfulness and other thinking problems. Brain diseases. A tumor or infection in the brain can cause memory problems or other dementia-like symptoms. If you're concerned about memory loss, see your doctor. There are tests to determine the degree of memory impairment and diagnose the cause. Your doctor is likely to ask you questions. It's good to have a family member or friend along to answer some questions based on observations. Questions might include: What medications, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs and dietary supplements, do you take and in what doses? What have you done to cope with memory problems? Have you recently been in an accident, fallen or injured your head? Have you recently had a major loss, a major change or stressful Continue reading >>

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

Nine Tips To Keep Your Memory With Diabetes

First, the good news. People, in general, are living longer. And people who have diabetes can and do live long, healthy lives. Now, the not-so-good news: People who have diabetes are more likely to experience memory problems than people without the condition. According to a study out of the University of South Florida in Tampa, older adults who had diabetes and high blood sugars performed worse on memory tests at the start of the study and showed a greater decline in memory by the end of the study compared to older adult without diabetes. What’s behind the memory decline in diabetes? Previous studies have shown that people with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a kind of dementia that causes issues with memory, thinking, and behavior. It’s progressive and irreversible, and it eventually destroys a person’s ability to carry out even the simplest of tasks. While memory loss is a key feature of Alzheimer’s, there are differences between the memory loss that occurs with aging and memory loss due to Alzheimer’s. However, both are more likely to occur in people with Type 2 diabetes. Researchers think that damage to blood vessels, which can occur in diabetes, is what can lead to cognitive problems and vascular dementia. It’s also possible that high blood sugar levels cause damage in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that’s involved in memory. Actually, high blood sugars appear to be detrimental to brain health, in general. But even people whose diabetes is in good control are more likely to experience memory problems and impairments in cognitive function. It’s also worth noting that having too many very low blood sugars (if you’re at risk for lows) may potentially also affect your memory and cognition. The g Continue reading >>

What’s Causing Your Memory Loss?

What’s Causing Your Memory Loss?

It's Not Necessarily Alzheimer’s More than 50 conditions can cause or mimic the symptoms of dementia, and a small percentage of dementias are reversible. Two common examples are dementia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency or an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Getting the right diagnosis is important so that you know what options you have, because symptoms subside when the underlying problem is treated. Distinguishing between types of dementia For physicians and families intent on pinning down a diagnosis, one major complicating factor is the existence of so many kinds of dementia. More than 50 conditions can mimic or cause dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is by far the most common intractable condition. But other causes of irreversible dementia include blood vessel diseasevascular dementia), other degenerative disorders (frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease), slow-growing brain tumors, or infections of the central nervous system (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, AIDS dementia, neurosyphilis). In some types of dementia, treatment will improve mental functioning, and in a small percentage, the dementia is completely reversible if treatment begins before permanent brain damage occurs. That’s why it is important to report to a doctor any signs of dementia as early as possible. Reversible dementias Reversible dementias are often easier to diagnose than irreversible dementias because they are usually accompanied by other, obvious symptoms. In the following conditions or situations, however, dementia may be the primary, or even the only, symptom. Proper treatment may improve or even restore cognitive functioning. Delirium Delirium causes changes in mental functioning that can closely resemble dementia, but there are two important di Continue reading >>

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Diabetes does cause memory loss. It may not be a progressive process that is clinical Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can happen related to the acute symptoms of diabetes. Interestingly, Alzheimer’s disease has been called “Type 3 Diabetes” or “Alzheimer ’s disease of the Brain” lately. In this article, we will look at how your diabetes affects memory and when and why this happens. To do this, we need to understand the four different types of memory loss. Also, looking at the symptoms and causes of memory loss will be helpful as we seek to learn how our Type 2 Diabetes may affect our memory. To further break it down, we will look at the two types of memory loss that results from Type 2 Diabetes, short and long-term memory loss. Types of memory loss or amnesia There are four different types of memory loss. The two that are most common, and that you may have heard of, are short-term memory loss and long-term memory loss. The other two types of memory loss, sensory memory loss and working memory loss, may not be as well-known. However, they are important to the preservation of human memory, thought and cognitive processes. As with many parts of the human body, memory loss is a complex issue. It involves many different factors, of which Type 2 Diabetes is one. Short-term memory loss The first sign of cognitive decline and one of the first symptoms of memory loss is short-term memory loss. I see this with my mother, when she doesn’t remember my dog’s name, or anything about the story that I just told her related to when I got him, how old he is, and all those details about pets that people may ask. Forgetting where they placed everyday objects, or forgetting what they went into a room to get can become an everyday occurrence. A set of keys becomes m Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Causes Of Memory Loss

5 Surprising Causes Of Memory Loss

You can't find your keys or you forget an appointment. For many people in middle age or older, simple acts of forgetfulness like these are scary because they raise the specter of Alzheimer's disease. But Alzheimer’s is not the only health issue that can lead to forgetfulness, which is often treatable if you know the cause, according to the National Institute on Aging. Memory loss can happen at any age and for a number of reasons. “Patients might experience memory loss and describe their symptoms similarly, but a doctor can tease apart what parts of the brain are affected,” says Seth Gale, MD, a neurologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He points out things like polypharmacy (taking several medications), significant depression, and poor sleep that can lead to memory complaints. “When you drill down and find out what is actually happening with brain function, you can reassure someone. They have the capacity to learn and store information but because of their overloaded mental resources, they are having trouble,” says Dr. Gale. Talk with your doctor about concerns you may have about your memory, so the condition responsible for your symptoms can be addressed. Discussing your symptoms and taking various tests, possibly including an MRI, may help your doctor determine what is affecting your memory, Gale says. In some cases, one or more of the following issues could play a role. 1. Sleep Apnea This common but treatable sleep disorder causes breathing to stop briefly and frequently throughout the night. It is linked to memory loss and dementia, according to Constantine Lyketsos, MD, director of the Memory and Alzheimer's Treatment Center at Johns Hopkins Medicine and professor and chair of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Bayview. You might have sleep apnea Continue reading >>

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

WebMD Live Events Transcript Memory loss is a frightening occurrence for anyone who finds the records of their lives fading away, whether it's minor forgetfulness or the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease. We had a memorable discussion about preventing and treating memory loss with Majid Fotuhi, MD. The opinions expressed herein are the guest's alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only. Moderator: Welcome to WebMD Live, Dr. Fotuhi. Is memory loss an inevitable part of aging? Fotuhi: No. People may have slower rate of learning and memorizing things, but they should not lose their memory. Some degree of forgetfulness is normal with aging, but people should maintain the ability to function in their jobs and remember names of their spouses, children, friends, and so on. The only thing they should not forget is the names of their close relatives and their friends. That would be abnormal. Moderator: How can one determine what is causing short-term memory loss? Fotuhi: The most common cause of memory loss is stress and anxiety. The second most common cause is depression. The third most common cause is medical issues. Only the 10th or 11th on the list would be Alzheimer's disease. Ninety percent of older adults who complain about memory loss do not have Alzheimer's disease. Most of them have depression, stress, anxiety, fatigue, and lack of sufficient amount of sleep or medical issues. Member question: What, if any, is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's disease? Fotuhi: That is a very good question. Dementia means memory loss plus deficit in one or more area of cognition, such as getting lost, confusion of tim Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Pre-diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes, Pre-diabetes And Memory Loss

People get diabetes when their blood glucose level, sometimes called blood sugar, is too high. Diabetes can lead to dangerous health problems, such as having a heart attack or stroke. The good news is that there are things you can do to take control of diabetes and prevent its problems. And, if you are worried about getting diabetes, there are things you can do to lower your risk. What Is Diabetes? Our bodies change the food we eat into glucose. Insulin helps glucose get into our cells where it can be used to make energy. If you have diabetes, your body may not make enough insulin, may not use insulin in the right way, or both. That may cause too much glucose in the blood. Your family doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in taking care of people with diabetes, called an endocrinologist. Types Of Diabetes There are two kinds of diabetes that can happen at any age. In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin. This type of diabetes develops most often in children and young adults. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin, but doesn’t use it the right way. It is the most common kind of diabetes. You may have heard it called adult-onset diabetes. Your chance of getting type 2 diabetes is higher if you are overweight, inactive, or have a family history of diabetes. Diabetes can affect many parts of your body. It’s important to keep type 2 diabetes under control. People with type 2 diabetes have a greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Pre-diabetes Many people have “pre-diabetes”; this means their glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an important warning signal because people with pre-diabetes are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. People who are pre-diabetic are asked to w Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

In 2012, 9.3 percent of people in the United States had diabetes. That means that about 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. This number is growing. Every year, doctors diagnose an estimated 1.4 million new cases in the United States. Diabetes is a disease that involves having higher-than-normal blood glucose levels. This is known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia occurs when your body can’t produce or respond to insulin. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Because of the reduced insulin production or resistance to the hormone, blood sugar levels tend to be high. Type 1 diabetes This is also known as juvenile diabetes. An autoimmune process may cause type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body’s antibodies attack the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. You need insulin to help glucose molecules enter the cells. Once glucose enters the cells, your body can use it to create energy. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce adequate amounts of insulin. This leads to higher than normal levels of blood sugar. Insulin injections are a necessary part of life for people living with type 1 diabetes. As of 2012, approximately 1.25 million Americans had type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes worldwide. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body produces insulin, but it can’t use it in the way that it should. This resistance causes the pancreas to produce more insulin. The added insulin increases the hormone levels in the bloodstream. This can have long-term negative effects on the brain. Check out: Diabetes by the numbers: Facts, statistics, and you » Memory loss is a normal phenomenon of aging. There are differences between memory loss that occurs with age and the complex memory Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

New research suggests that people with high blood sugar levels, even those who do not have diabetes, may have an increased risk for developing cognitive impairment. This is according to a study published in the journal Neurology. Previous research has shown that people with type 2 diabetes - a disorder that causes a person's blood sugar levels to become too high - may increase the risk of dementia. According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is considered a risk factor for vascular dementia as it can damage blood vessels in the brain. This form of dementia is often caused by reduced or blocked blood flow to the brain. But researchers from Germany now say that even those without diabetes who have high blood sugar levels may be at risk for impaired memory skills. Scanning the hippocampus To reach their findings, the researchers analyzed 143 people with an average age of 63, who were free of diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose intolerance). The researchers excluded those who were overweight, consumed more than 3.5 servings of alcohol per day, and those who already had memory and thinking impairments. The participants underwent blood glucose tests and were required to carry out memory tests. One of the tests required subjects to recall a list of 15 words 30 minutes after hearing them. The researchers also carried out scans of the participants' brains in order measure the size of the hippocampus - a region of the brain linked to memory. Results showed that participants who had lower blood sugar levels obtained higher scores on the memory tests, compared with those who had higher blood sugar levels. In the word recall test, the researchers found that remembering fewer words was linked to higher blood sugar levels. They break this down, stating that an increase of 7 mmol/mol Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Copyright © Mark Beselt Diabetes is an incurable disease characterized by high blood glucose levels. This is the result of the body's inability to produce or use insulin. One of the complications of diabetes is short term memory loss - and in this article we'll look at the different variations of the disease and how each type can be a cause of memory loss. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases which affects nearly 24 million (8%) of the US population. The condition is is categorized into three different forms: Type 1 Diabetes is a genetic defect usually diagnosed in children and young adults. It arises from the inability to produce the hormone insulin, which is needed every time you eat to convert sugar and starches into energy. People with Type 1 diabetes usually need to inject insulin into their bodies and constantly be aware of their blood sugar levels. Fortunately, this most extreme form of diabetes only affects 5-10% of all sufferers but with no cure is does remain a lifelong condition. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and millions of Americans have been diagnosed, although many more are at high risk. This condition is often diagnosed later in life when the body can no longer produce enough insulin, or the cells begin to ignore the insulin. Without intervention, this can lead to serious complications including heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke. Gestational Diabetes is a temporary form of the disease which affects around 4% of all pregnant women at 28 weeks or later. It begins when hormones from the placenta block the action of the mother's insulin. The condition corrects itself after the birth but it is very important to maintain healthy blood sugar levels during pregnancy to avoid serious complications for both mother an Continue reading >>

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