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Diabetes Memory Loss

(video) Researchers Find Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug

(video) Researchers Find Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug

Promising Alzheimers Treatment Using Diabetes Drug Scientists announced a drug that significantly reversed memory loss in mice with Alzheimers disease. Researchers from Lancaster University in the UK say the novel drug created to treat type 2 diabetes works through a triple method of action and also add that the medicine could provide substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimers disease . The drug combines three growth factors that act in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. The Lancaster University scientists published their study results on January 1 in the journal Brain Research. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University said the novel treatment holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers disease. Alzheimers disease is the most frequent cause of dementia in the United States, currently afflicting more than 5 million adults.Current drugs only treat the symptoms of the disease, however, no medicine halts or delays its progression. If a drug or lifestyle change such as diet or exercise could be found that delayed functional deterioration by as little as 1 to 2 years, it would substantially reduce suffering to Alzheimers patients as well costs to families and society. Dr. Doug Brown, the Director of Research and Development at the Alzheimers Society, said: With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimers. Its imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimers and other forms of dementia . This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them. adding Although the benefits of these triple a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Lead To Memory Loss

Diabetes Can Lead To Memory Loss

Home » News » Diabetes Can Lead To Memory Loss Type-2 diabetes can often lead to physical and mental dullness. Repeated hypoglycaemia can cause irreversible brain damage causing memory loss. Shares 1 Diabetes has already locked your sweets away, but according to a study people suffering from type 2 diabetes have another problem to look out for, they can also suffer from some mental disorders, specifically loss of memory retention. Researchers say that the onset of hypoglycaemia, a medical condition where the level of glucose in the blood falls below the normal. Dr P. Sudhakar Reddy, an endocrinologist, said, "Type-2 diabetes can often lead to physical and mental dullness. Repeated hypoglycaemia can cause irreversible brain damage causing memory loss." Memory loss has been linked with brain not functioning properly, and if the blood sugar falls below what is deemed necessary, the brain's performance will be hindered. Dr Sudhir Kumar, a neurologist, said, "Brain disorders occur in Type-2 diabetic patients when the brain doesn't get enough sugar to carry out its functions. Low blood sugar levels can make a person feel very disoriented and confused." Another study found that features in diabetes are similar to those found in the brain tissue of patients who have Alzheimer's Dr Sridevi Palidugu, an endocrinologist, says, "Cognitive dysfunction is very common following a stroke and the probability of a stroke is higher in Type-2 diabetic patients, as the blood supply to their brain is affected and with the peripheral nerves affected, it could lead to brain disorders." Dr Ravi Shankar Erukulapati, an endocrinologist, said, "Memory and other functions of the brain get affected by diabetes over a long duration. This can clearly be observed as many patients of Alzheimer's and d Continue reading >>

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

WebMD Live Events Transcript Memory loss is a frightening occurrence for anyone who finds the records of their lives fading away, whether it's minor forgetfulness or the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease. We had a memorable discussion about preventing and treating memory loss with Majid Fotuhi, MD. The opinions expressed herein are the guest's alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only. Moderator: Welcome to WebMD Live, Dr. Fotuhi. Is memory loss an inevitable part of aging? Fotuhi: No. People may have slower rate of learning and memorizing things, but they should not lose their memory. Some degree of forgetfulness is normal with aging, but people should maintain the ability to function in their jobs and remember names of their spouses, children, friends, and so on. The only thing they should not forget is the names of their close relatives and their friends. That would be abnormal. Moderator: How can one determine what is causing short-term memory loss? Fotuhi: The most common cause of memory loss is stress and anxiety. The second most common cause is depression. The third most common cause is medical issues. Only the 10th or 11th on the list would be Alzheimer's disease. Ninety percent of older adults who complain about memory loss do not have Alzheimer's disease. Most of them have depression, stress, anxiety, fatigue, and lack of sufficient amount of sleep or medical issues. Member question: What, if any, is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's disease? Fotuhi: That is a very good question. Dementia means memory loss plus deficit in one or more area of cognition, such as getting lost, confusion of tim Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug ‘significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ In Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Diabetes Drug ‘significantly Reverses Memory Loss’ In Alzheimer’s: Mouse Study

Summary: Lancaster University researchers report a drug developed to treat diabetes shows promise in reversing memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s in mouse models of the disease. The drug appears to have a neuroprotective effect, enhancing brain growth factors while reducing amyloid plaques, chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. The drug also slows down the rate of neuron loss. Source: Lancaster University. A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer’s after scientists found it “significantly reversed memory loss” in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment “holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.” Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer’s Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “”With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer’s. It’s imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them.” Although the benefits of these ‘triple agonist’ drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with ex Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Researchers have long known that inflammation plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. This inflammation comes from substances that are produced by the body’s immune and fat cells. The result: impaired blood flow and blood vessel function— which impacts the health of the heart, kidneys and other organs and body systems. A study published in a July 2015 journal Neurology found that this reduced blood flow and blood vessel capability also affects the brain by speeding up cognitive decline and memory loss in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Measuring the Impact The researchers studied 65 men and women between the ages of 57 and 75. Thirty-five of the study participants had been treated for type 2 diabetes for more than five years at the beginning of the study. The initial assessment of all participants included testing of memory and cognitive function skills, as well as MRI scans and blood tests to determine baseline blood flow, blood pressure, markers of inflammation, and brain volume. None of the participants had any type of cognitive impairment at the time of the initial assessment. At a two-year follow-up, those with type 2 diabetes showed a significant decline in thinking and memory scores. None of the non-diabetic participants showed any decline. Blood vessel health and blood flow regulation were also seriously impaired in those with diabetes. “We ultimately concluded that diabetes-related inflammation of the small blood vessels in the brain may accelerate decline in those with type 2 diabetes,” says study author Vera Novak, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and director of Syncope and Falls in the Elderly (SAFE) laboratory at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This, in turn, affects not only their overall health but also their day- Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Copyright © Mark Beselt Diabetes is an incurable disease characterized by high blood glucose levels. This is the result of the body's inability to produce or use insulin. One of the complications of diabetes is short term memory loss - and in this article we'll look at the different variations of the disease and how each type can be a cause of memory loss. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases which affects nearly 24 million (8%) of the US population. The condition is is categorized into three different forms: Type 1 Diabetes is a genetic defect usually diagnosed in children and young adults. It arises from the inability to produce the hormone insulin, which is needed every time you eat to convert sugar and starches into energy. People with Type 1 diabetes usually need to inject insulin into their bodies and constantly be aware of their blood sugar levels. Fortunately, this most extreme form of diabetes only affects 5-10% of all sufferers but with no cure is does remain a lifelong condition. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and millions of Americans have been diagnosed, although many more are at high risk. This condition is often diagnosed later in life when the body can no longer produce enough insulin, or the cells begin to ignore the insulin. Without intervention, this can lead to serious complications including heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke. Gestational Diabetes is a temporary form of the disease which affects around 4% of all pregnant women at 28 weeks or later. It begins when hormones from the placenta block the action of the mother's insulin. The condition corrects itself after the birth but it is very important to maintain healthy blood sugar levels during pregnancy to avoid serious complications for both mother an Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's Treatment: Diabetes Drug Holds Promise For Fighting Disease After 'significantly Reversing' Memory Loss

Alzheimer's Treatment: Diabetes Drug Holds Promise For Fighting Disease After 'significantly Reversing' Memory Loss

A drug developed for type 2 diabetes significantly reverses memory loss and could have potential as a new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, scientists say. The study, by UK and Chinese universities, is the first to look at a new combined diabetes drug and found improvements in several characteristic symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher, from Lancaster University, said these “very promising outcomes” show multi-action drugs developed for type 2 diabetes “consistently show neurological protective effects”. Independent academics said a reduction in nerve-cell-killing protein molecules was particularly interesting and this was likely to be another avenue in the search for an elusive drug to combat dementia. He has previously reported optimistic findings from an older diabetes drug, liraglutide, and clinical trials in humans are currently under way. This latest study, published in the journal Brain Research, looked at a “triple action” treatment that combine three different drugs for type 2 diabetes, acting on biological pathways that could also have an impact on dementia. Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for Alzhemier’s disease and impaired production of insulin – the hormone that people with diabetes don’t produce sufficiently to control their blood sugar – is linked to brain degeneration. The identification of this link had a twofold benefit, according to charities. It opened up new research and drug development opportunities, such as this study. But it also means that by making lifestyle changes, like eating healthily and exercising, patients can avoid developing type-2 diabetes and lower their risk of Alzheimer’s disease as well. There are currently half a million peop Continue reading >>

Scientists Claim They Found A Drug That Significantly Reverses Memory Loss

Scientists Claim They Found A Drug That Significantly Reverses Memory Loss

A team at Lancaster University in the U.K. has discovered that a drug designed to treat type 2 diabetes may hold the key to fighting the memory loss that accompanies Alzheimers disease. Their study has been published in Brain Research . The medication is a triple receptor drug that combines the growth factors GLP-1, GIP, and Glucagon to protect the brain from degeneration. The researchers tested the medication using transgenic mice expressing the mutated genes that cause Alzheimers in humans. These genes run in families and are responsible for a form of Alzheimers that can be inherited. The researchers observed the mice as they made their way through a water maze. They discovered that the mice treated with the diabetes compound showed an improved memory and sense of direction. Remarkably, the drug not only seemed to protect the brain, but also to reverse some of the damage caused by the amyloid plaques that progressively kill the neurons of Alzheimers patients. The way the drug works is that it can help neurons to repair and restore their functions again. It cannot bring back dead neurons once they are gone, they are gone, lead author Christian Holscher of Lancaster University told Futurism. However, there are a lot of stressed neurons that are still alive but no longer function properly. Thats where the window of opportunity lies. The first clinical trials showed the same effect in people, so it is not just some mouse artifact, added Holscher. A recent phase II clinical trial in Parkinsons patients showed some really nice results, so we are getting close! Because diabetes is a risk factor in Alzheimers, some scientists are hopeful that diabetes drugs could be effective treatments for neurodegeneration. According to the study, the link between the two could be that ins Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug 'significantly Reverses Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. VIDEO:A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it 'significantly reversed memory loss' in mice through a triple method of action.This is the first... view more A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice through a triple method of action. The research, published in Brain Research, could bring substantial improvements in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease through the use of a drug originally created to treat type 2 diabetes. Lead researcher Professor Christian Holscher of Lancaster University in the UK said the novel treatment "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and the numbers are expected to rise to two million people in the UK by 2051 according to Alzheimer's Society, who part- funded the research. Dr Doug Brown, Director of Research and Development at Alzheimer's Society, said: ""With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's. It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Although the benefits of these 'triple agonist' drugs have so far only been found in mice, other studies with exist Continue reading >>

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Will Type 2 Diabetes Affect My Memory?

Diabetes does cause memory loss. It may not be a progressive process that is clinical Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but it can happen related to the acute symptoms of diabetes. Interestingly, Alzheimer’s disease has been called “Type 3 Diabetes” or “Alzheimer ’s disease of the Brain” lately. In this article, we will look at how your diabetes affects memory and when and why this happens. To do this, we need to understand the four different types of memory loss. Also, looking at the symptoms and causes of memory loss will be helpful as we seek to learn how our Type 2 Diabetes may affect our memory. To further break it down, we will look at the two types of memory loss that results from Type 2 Diabetes, short and long-term memory loss. Types of memory loss or amnesia There are four different types of memory loss. The two that are most common, and that you may have heard of, are short-term memory loss and long-term memory loss. The other two types of memory loss, sensory memory loss and working memory loss, may not be as well-known. However, they are important to the preservation of human memory, thought and cognitive processes. As with many parts of the human body, memory loss is a complex issue. It involves many different factors, of which Type 2 Diabetes is one. Short-term memory loss The first sign of cognitive decline and one of the first symptoms of memory loss is short-term memory loss. I see this with my mother, when she doesn’t remember my dog’s name, or anything about the story that I just told her related to when I got him, how old he is, and all those details about pets that people may ask. Forgetting where they placed everyday objects, or forgetting what they went into a room to get can become an everyday occurrence. A set of keys becomes m Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Pre-diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes, Pre-diabetes And Memory Loss

People get diabetes when their blood glucose level, sometimes called blood sugar, is too high. Diabetes can lead to dangerous health problems, such as having a heart attack or stroke. The good news is that there are things you can do to take control of diabetes and prevent its problems. And, if you are worried about getting diabetes, there are things you can do to lower your risk. What Is Diabetes? Our bodies change the food we eat into glucose. Insulin helps glucose get into our cells where it can be used to make energy. If you have diabetes, your body may not make enough insulin, may not use insulin in the right way, or both. That may cause too much glucose in the blood. Your family doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in taking care of people with diabetes, called an endocrinologist. Types Of Diabetes There are two kinds of diabetes that can happen at any age. In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin. This type of diabetes develops most often in children and young adults. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin, but doesn’t use it the right way. It is the most common kind of diabetes. You may have heard it called adult-onset diabetes. Your chance of getting type 2 diabetes is higher if you are overweight, inactive, or have a family history of diabetes. Diabetes can affect many parts of your body. It’s important to keep type 2 diabetes under control. People with type 2 diabetes have a greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Pre-diabetes Many people have “pre-diabetes”; this means their glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an important warning signal because people with pre-diabetes are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. People who are pre-diabetic are asked to w Continue reading >>

Confusion, Memory Loss, And Altered Alertness

Confusion, Memory Loss, And Altered Alertness

Topic Overview It is not unusual to occasionally forget where you put your keys or glasses, where you parked your car, or the name of an acquaintance. As you age, it may take you longer to remember things. Not all older adults have memory changes, but they can be a normal part of aging. This type of memory problem is more often annoying than serious. Memory loss that begins suddenly or that significantly interferes with your ability to function in daily life may mean a more serious problem is present. Dementia is a slow decline in memory, problem-solving ability, learning ability, and judgment that may occur over several weeks to several months. Many health conditions can cause dementia or symptoms similar to dementia. In some cases dementia may be reversible. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in people older than age 65. Delirium is a sudden change in how well a person's brain is working (mental status). Delirium can cause confusion, change the sleep-wake cycles, and cause unusual behavior. Delirium can have many causes, such as withdrawal from alcohol or drugs or medicines, or the development or worsening of an infection or other health problem. Amnesia is memory loss that may be caused by a head injury, a stroke, substance abuse, or a severe emotional event, such as from combat or a motor vehicle accident. Depending upon the cause, amnesia may be either temporary or permanent. Confusion or decreased alertness may be the first symptom of a serious illness, particularly in older adults. Health problems that can cause confusion or decreased alertness include: Alzheimer's disease. Asthma or COPD, which cause a decrease in the amount of oxygen or an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood. Alcohol and many prescription and nonprescript Continue reading >>

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

Q: “My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” A: The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day. Statistics are grim. 10 percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death. Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen. Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'significantly Reversed Memory Loss' In Mice With Alzheimer's

A Diabetes Drug Has 'Significantly Reversed Memory Loss' in Mice With Alzheimer's A drug developed for type 2 diabetes has " significantly reversed memory loss " in mice with Alzheimer's disease, and researchers now want to test it on humans. The treatment is exciting for scientists because it works by protecting the brain cells attacked by Alzheimer's disease in three separate ways, rather than relying on a single approach. And seeing as the drug has already been tested and approved for use in humans, it's something that could hit the market a lot faster than other experimental treatment options. The results have only been seen in mice so far, but the drug "holds clear promise of being developed into a new treatment for chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease," said senior author ChristianHlscher of Lancaster University in the UK. "With no new treatments in nearly 15 years, we need to find new ways of tackling Alzheimer's," said Doug Brown from UK organisation, Alzheimer's Society. "It's imperative that we explore whether drugs developed to treat other conditions can benefit people with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. This approach to research could make it much quicker to get promising new drugs to the people who need them." Previous research had already established a link between type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's - type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's, and it also appears to make the disease progress more rapidly. This could be a result of insulin not getting to the cells properly - insulin is a growth factor which is known to protect brain cells, and insulin resistance has been observed in Alzheimer's disease brains, as well as being the biological mechanism behind type 2 diabetes. So researchers have been investigating wh Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

Can Diabetes Lead To Memory Loss?

In 2012, 9.3 percent of people in the United States had diabetes. That means that about 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. This number is growing. Every year, doctors diagnose an estimated 1.4 million new cases in the United States. Diabetes is a disease that involves having higher-than-normal blood glucose levels. This is known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia occurs when your body can’t produce or respond to insulin. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Because of the reduced insulin production or resistance to the hormone, blood sugar levels tend to be high. Type 1 diabetes This is also known as juvenile diabetes. An autoimmune process may cause type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body’s antibodies attack the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. You need insulin to help glucose molecules enter the cells. Once glucose enters the cells, your body can use it to create energy. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce adequate amounts of insulin. This leads to higher than normal levels of blood sugar. Insulin injections are a necessary part of life for people living with type 1 diabetes. As of 2012, approximately 1.25 million Americans had type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes worldwide. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body produces insulin, but it can’t use it in the way that it should. This resistance causes the pancreas to produce more insulin. The added insulin increases the hormone levels in the bloodstream. This can have long-term negative effects on the brain. Check out: Diabetes by the numbers: Facts, statistics, and you » Memory loss is a normal phenomenon of aging. There are differences between memory loss that occurs with age and the complex memory Continue reading >>

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