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Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 And Sleep Apnea

Diabetes Mellitus, Facial Swelling, Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

Diabetes Mellitus, Facial Swelling, Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

The CDC says that 1 in 3 American children born in 2000 will develop diabetes, and children under 10 years of age are already developing type 2 diabetes, which is primarily [sleepfoundation.org] (Dixit and Girling, 2008) Obstructive Sleep Apnea Persons who are obese have a greater likelihood for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), or periods of absent breathing while asleep [library.med.utah.edu] Diabetes - Obesity is the major cause oftype 2 diabetes. [stanfordhealthcare.org] Discharges for sleep apnea increased 436%. [sleepfoundation.org] Both type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome share common features, and patients may be defined as having one or both. [library.med.utah.edu] Sleep apnea and respiratory problems- Sleep apnea , which causes people to stop breathing for brief periods, interrupts sleep throughout the night and causes sleepiness during [stanfordhealthcare.org] An estimated 18 million Americans have sleep apnea, which is often associated with people who are overweight. [sleepfoundation.org] Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by changes in lifestyle among subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. [library.med.utah.edu] People who are overweight or obese have a much greater risk of developing serious conditions, including: Heart disease Type 2 diabetes Bone and joint disease Obesity in the [stanfordhealthcare.org] The problem of obesity in children is a major concern for another reason: the increased incidence of sleep apnea. [sleepfoundation.org] "Women with sleeping problems at higher risk for Type 2 diabetes" . [en.wikipedia.org] Two Types . . [apneos.com] Proper patient and procedure selection is critical to successful surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea. [entnet.org] Some use the terms obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or obstructive Continue reading >>

Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Or Hypertension Must Be Evaluated For Sleep Apnea

Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Or Hypertension Must Be Evaluated For Sleep Apnea

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Katie Blyth, L.C. Williams & Associates, 312-565-3900, [email protected] BALTIMORE, MD – June 3, 2013 – The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) is advising anyone with Type 2 diabetes or hypertension to be evaluated for sleep apnea by a board-certified sleep medicine physician. The recommendation comes as the group of international clinicians and researchers meets in Baltimore for SLEEP 2013, the foremost gathering of sleep experts annually. Overwhelming clinical evidence has shown that patients suffering from two very common illnesses – Type 2 diabetes and hypertension – are at much higher risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a dangerous condition characterized by episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction during sleep. Research also has shown that treating sleep apnea can help in the management of these two disorders. “Type 2 diabetics and people with hypertension are much more likely to have obstructive sleep apnea than other people, and as a result should immediately discuss their risk for sleep apnea with a sleep specialist,” said M. Safwan Badr, MD, president of AASM. “Diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea from a board-certified sleep medicine physician will promote improvement in these conditions – including improved insulin sensitivity, blood pressure and cholesterol.” Type 2 Diabetes and Obstructive Sleep Apnea According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.6 million Americans aged 20 years or older suffer from diabetes, and Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases. Seven in 10 people with Type 2 diabetes also have obstructive sleep apnea, and the severity of the sleep disorder directly impacts diabetes symptoms; the more severe a diabetic’s unt Continue reading >>

Pathophysiology In Type 2 Diabetes – Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep-disordered Breathing/sleep Apnea – Role Of Adipocytokines

Pathophysiology In Type 2 Diabetes – Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep-disordered Breathing/sleep Apnea – Role Of Adipocytokines

1. Introduction Sleep is a complex behavioral state that occupies one-third of the human life span. Although viewed as a passive condition, sleep is a highly active and dynamic process. Sleep was considered to be primarily important for restoration of brain function. However, to date, there is increasing evidence that sleep also modulates the metabolic, endocrine and cardiovascular systems [Trenell, 2007; Boethel, 2002; Knutson & Van Cauter, 2007; Knutson, 2008]. It is known that if left untreated, sleep disorders can have significant impact on daytime function, including learning, memory, attention, and behavior. The approach to the treatment of these disorders (whether with or without pharmacotherapy) is dependent on a thorough evaluation of the sleep complaint and accurate diagnosis. Previous studies reported a consistent difference between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects in the number of sleep disturbances per hour, indicating possible influence of diabetes on sleep pattern [Resnick, 2003; Kawakami, 2004]. Several studies have shown that patients with T2DM sleep less than the general population [Vgontzas, 2000; Buxton, 2010]. A gradual decrease in self-reported sleep duration seems to have developed over the same period as the dramatic increase in the incidence of obesity and diabetes, including a close relationship between sleep cycle and diabetes [Van Cauter, 1997; Spiegel, 2005; Chasens, 2007; Knutson & Van Cauter, 2008]. Sleeping disorders related to T2DM include insomnia, restless leg syndrome, periodic leg movement disorder, excessive daytime sleepiness, sleepwalking, nightmares, narcolepsy, and SDB, especially SA. T2DM and SDB/SA are both prevalent diseases that share several risk factors, including advanced age and obesity [Tishler, 2003; Young, 1993]. T2 Continue reading >>

Quality Of Sleep And Risk For Obstructive Sleep Apnoea In Ambulant Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus At A Tertiary Referral Hospital In Kenya: A Cross-sectional, Comparative Study

Quality Of Sleep And Risk For Obstructive Sleep Apnoea In Ambulant Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus At A Tertiary Referral Hospital In Kenya: A Cross-sectional, Comparative Study

Quality of sleep and risk for obstructive sleep apnoea in ambulant individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus at a tertiary referral hospital in Kenya: a cross-sectional, comparative study Sleep disorders are common and associated with multiple metabolic and psychological derangements. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is among the most common sleep disorders and an inter-relationship between OSA, insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases has been established. Prevalence of sleep disorders in Kenyans, particularly in individuals with T2DM is unknown. We thus aimed to determine prevalence of poor quality of sleep (QOS) and high risk for OSA, among persons with T2DM and determine their associations with socio-demographic and anthropometric variables. Utilising a Cross- Sectional Descriptive design, QOS and risk for OSA were determined in a randomly selected sample of patients with T2DM (cases) and an age and sex matched comparison group. The validated Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) were used to measure QOS and risk for OSA respectively. Associations between poor QOS, high risk for OSA, and socio-demographic and anthropometric variables in cases were evaluated. From 245 randomly selected persons with T2DM attending outpatient clinics, aged over 18years, 22 were excluded due to ineligibility thus 223 were included in the analysis; 53.8% were females, mean age was 56.8 (SD 12.2) years and mean BMI was 28.8kg/m2 (SD 4.4). Among them, 119 (53%, CI 95% 46.560.2) had poor QOS and 99 (44% CI 95% 37.850.9) were at high risk for OSA. Among 112 individuals in comparison group, 33 (29.5%, CI 95% 20.938.3) had poor QOS and 9 (8%, CI 95% 3.313.4) had high risk for OSA. Cases had a significantly higher probability f Continue reading >>

Sleep Apneahypopnea Syndrome And Type 2 Diabetes. A Reciprocal Relationship? | Archivos De Bronconeumologa (english Edition)

Sleep Apneahypopnea Syndrome And Type 2 Diabetes. A Reciprocal Relationship? | Archivos De Bronconeumologa (english Edition)

Sleep ApneaHypopnea Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes. A Reciprocal Relationship? Sndrome de apneas-hipopneas del sueo y diabetes tipo 2. Una relacin de ida y vuelta? Elisabet Martnez Cern a , Raquel Casitas Mateos a , Francisco Garca-Ro a , b , c , a Servicio de Neumologa, Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ, Madrid, Spain b Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain c CIBER de enfermedades respiratorias (CIBERES), Madrid, Spain Received 14 May 2014, Accepted 16 June 2014 Epidemiological data suggest that sleep apneahypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is independently associated with the development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Moreover, despite significant methodological limitations, some studies report a high prevalence of SAHS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A recent meta-analysis shows that moderatesevere SAHS is associated with an increased risk of DM2 (relative risk=1.63 [092.45]), compared to the absence of apneas and hypopneas. Common alterations in various pathogenic pathways add biological plausibility to this relationship. Intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, caused by successive apneahypopnea episodes, induce several intermediate disorders, such as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, alterations in appetite-regulating hormones and activation of the hypothalamicpituitaryadrenal axis which, in turn, favor the development of insulin resistance, its progression to glucose intolerance and, ultimately, to DM2. Concomitant SAHS seems to increase DM2 severity, since it worsens glycemic control and enhances the effects of atherosclerosis on the development of macrovascular complications. Furthermore, SAHS may be associated with the development of microvascular complications: retinopa Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea Can Boost Diabetes Risk

Sleep Apnea Can Boost Diabetes Risk

Weight gain, lack of exercise, and poor diet are all tied to Type 2 diabetes. But researchers warn that another key risk factor can increase the odds of developing the metabolic disorder: sleep apnea. And that may come as a surprise to many of the growing number of Americans who suffer from the sleep disorder and dont know its linked to diabetes, says Dr. Joseph Krainin, a board-certified sleep medicine and neurology specialist and founder of Singular Sleep telemedicine health startup licensed to practice in 40 states. Krainin explains that undiagnosed and/or untreated sleep apnea may cause, or worsen, both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. As a result, its important that diabetics be screened for sleep apnea. "Although there is a solid body of medical research studies to link obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and diabetes mellitus (DM) and screening recommendations from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology respectively, my experience is that the majority of diabetes patients, as well as the healthcare providers who manage them, are unaware of this important connection," says Krainin, chief medical advisor for SoClean, the CPAP sanitizing device company Interrupted sleep, which occurs with sleep apnea, can cause an increased stress on the body and make it harder to keep blood sugar levels under control. Excess weight around the neck in those with Type 2 diabetes can obstruct the airway during sleep, resulting in stopping and starting breathing repeatedly the hallmark characteristic of sleep apnea. The abnormal breathing patterns can boost blood glucose levels that promotes the insulin resistance that underlies type 2 diabetes. Treating apnea with a CPAP device or other methods can improve blood sugar control and hemoglobin A Continue reading >>

New Insight Into The Role Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea In Cardiometabolic Diseases

New Insight Into The Role Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea In Cardiometabolic Diseases

New Insight into the Role of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Cardiometabolic Diseases New Insight into the Role of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Cardiometabolic Diseases Department of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Craiova, Romania University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Romania Department of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Craiova, Romania Department of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Craiova, Romania University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Romania Department of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Craiova, Romania University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Romania Department of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Craiova, Romania University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Romania Department of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, Clinical County Emergency Hospital, Craiova, Romania University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Romania Published Online: 2017-12-30 | DOI: Humans spend almost one third of their life sleeping, thus sleep deprivation or poor sleep quality will have consequences upon the quality of life. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder that represents a respiratory cessation for at least ten seconds, which appears repeatable during sleep and it is accompanied by decreased oxygen saturation. The diagnosis of OSA is possible by filling in the STOP, STOP BANG, BERLIN questionnaires and performing the polysomnography, an accessible and more accurate method but yet very expensive. The prevalence of OSA is continuously increasing, but because of the nonspecific symptoms, the percentage Continue reading >>

The Risk Of Developing Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients In Uzbek Population

The Risk Of Developing Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients In Uzbek Population

Endocrine Abstracts (2016) 41 EP459 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.41.EP459 The risk of developing of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Uzbek population S I Ismailov1,2, D M Esimova2, S U Muminova1, F T Sultanova2 & Kh R Gulyamova1 Author affiliations View ePoster Download ePoster 1Tashkent Pediatric Medical Institute, Tashkent, Uzbekistan; 2RSSPMC of Endocrinology, Tashkent, Uzbekistan. Actuality: According to WHO, 36% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) suffer from obstructive sleep apnoe syndrome (OSAS), which is one of global problems of modern medicine. International classification of sleep disorders identified that 24% of men and 9% of women with T2DM observe symptoms of OSAS. Sleep apnea has a negative effect on the function of the beta cells of the pancreas and insulin sensitivity. Obstructive sleep apnea has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes in the physical and psychological sphere, lowers the overall health and performance of physiological sleep. Purpose: Study the risk of OSAS in T2DM patients in Uzbekistan. Materials and methods: The study included 300 patients, 150 women and 150 men with T2DM in middle age (4560 years). Disease duration from 5 to 15 years. Identification of OSAS was carried out by STOP-BANG questionnaire with measurement of neck circumference, body mass index. OSAS risk was determined by summing up the points(p): high risk 5-8p, average 3-4p, low 0-2p. Results: 46 (31%) women and 46 (31%) of men had high risk, 78 (52%) women and 69 (46%) men had medium risk, 26 (17%) women and 35 (23%) men had low risk of OSAS. OSAS prevailed in the group of middle-aged women with low quality of life in comparison with men. Conclusion: Our data results showed no gender diff Continue reading >>

To Study The Prevalence Of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea In Type 2 Diabetes Patients In Western Rajasthan, India | Bhimwal | International Journal Of Advances In Medicine

To Study The Prevalence Of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea In Type 2 Diabetes Patients In Western Rajasthan, India | Bhimwal | International Journal Of Advances In Medicine

DOI: To study the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea in type 2 diabetes patients in Western Rajasthan, India Raj Kumar Bhimwal, Mohan Makwana, Ravindra Jangid, Ratan Lal Bhati Background: Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) has been too common yet under diagnosed clinical entity. It is associated with the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of cardio-metabolic parameters including central obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Obesity predisposes to both OSA and disorders in glucose metabolism. There is growing evidence that OSA confers an independent risk of adverse glucose metabolism. Methods: The present study conducted in the Department of Medicine at MDM Hospital attached to Dr. S.N. Medical College, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. Participants after understanding the study protocol and procedure, asked to give their written consent for the study. It was a cross sectional hospital based study in patients, screened at Diabetic clinic and those referred from the periphery. Berlin questionnaires and Epworth score are tools to screen for OSA attending the Medicine OPD and IPD, Dr. S. N. Medical College, Jodhpur. 50 patients with type 2 DM and 20 age and sex-matched controls were studied. Randomly selected T2DM subjects of age 20 to 75 years both sex with obesity, BMI>25 kg/m2, clinical history suggestive of OSA, Epworth score>6, Positive Berlin questionnaires were included in the study. Acute and unstable medical condition e.g. CHF, CRF, COPD, Recent stroke, Acute ACS, Pregnant women were excluded. Results: In the study OSA was prevalent in the diabetic population (54%), Mean age of the study population was 54.969.35 years. OSA was found to be increased with increasing age with maximum prevalence in 60 years age group. OSA was more prevalent in the male popul Continue reading >>

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

We all know the miserable after-effects of a poor night’s sleep. Unfortunately, that dreary, frazzled, anxious state can be a more common reality for for someone with Type 1 diabetes. Doctors at the Sleep Disorders Program at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center estimate that 40-50% of people with diabetes complain of poor sleep. And getting a good night’s rest can help in blood glucose management as well as overall health. So what should you watch out for if you have Type 1? And how can you better your odds of a good night’s rest? Here are the most common sleeping disorders that you may be faced with and some basic advice on how to maintain healthy sleep hygiene. Sleep Apnea A person with sleep apnea stops and starts breathing repeatedly while asleep, preventing them from achieving deeper states of sleep. Warning signs of sleep apnea include: daytime drowsiness excessive nighttime snoring There are two kinds of sleep apnea – Obstructive sleep apnea – occurs when the upper airway or throat region narrows, oxygen levels decrease, and eventually the brain triggers a response to wake the person up (at least enough to take a full breath and reopen the airway). Central sleep apnea – occurs when brain signals to the muscles that control breathing are confused. Both types of sleep apnea prevent a person from getting the kind of deep, restful sleep needed to wake up feeling refreshed. While scientific research has long highlighted a correlation between Type 2 diabetes and obesity and an increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea, sleep apnea occurrences is also high in those with Type 1 diabetes. Some studies have found obstructive sleep apnea in as many as 30% of adults with Type 1 diabetes. And the majority of those tested maintained a healthy, normal weig Continue reading >>

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus | Tan | British Journal Of Diabetes

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea And Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus | Tan | British Journal Of Diabetes

Obstructive sleep apnoea and type 1 diabetes mellitus Hiang Leng Tan,1 Feaz Babwah,2 Najeeb Waheed,2 Muhammad Imran Butt3 1 Weston General Hospital, Weston-super-Mare, UK 2 The County Hospital, Hereford, Wye Valley NHS Trust, UK 3 Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough, UK Address for correspondence: Dr Hiang Leng Tan Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Weston General Hospital, OSA is a common and frequently unrecognised disorder with a prevalence of approximately 4% in middle-aged men and 2% in middle-aged women.1 It is often found in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This case report shows the infrequently documented link between OSA and type 1 diabetes and highlights the need to confirm the type of diabetes especially in complex and atypical cases. A 44 year-old teacher was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in March 2007. He was obese, weighing 135 kg, with a BMI of 34.2 kg/m2. His initial HbA1cwas 9.9% (85 mmol/mol) and he responded well to lifestyle changes and metformin in a dose of 850 mg three times a day. By March 2008, which was within a year of diagnosis, his HbA1chad improved to 6.6% (49 mmol/mol). Further cardiovascular assessment confirmed that he also had hypertension and hyperlipidaemia requiring treatment. He was a non-smoker and had no family history of diabetes. In June 2008, he began feeling unwell with dramatic weight loss of 16 kg in just 3 months, osmotic symptoms and worsening of his HbA1cto 14.1% (131 mmol/mol). Although he was not ketoacidotic, the history pointed to possible type 1 diabetes. He was commenced on a basal bolus insulin regime (glargine + glulisine) which resulted in a quick recovery. Over the next few years his weight progressively increased as well as his insulin requirement, as shown in Table 1. During o Continue reading >>

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

Effect Of Cpap On Myocardial Dysfunction In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

Effect Of Cpap On Myocardial Dysfunction In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effect of CPAP on Myocardial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03221205 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias National Council of Science and Technology, Mexico Information provided by (Responsible Party): Armando Castorena-Maldonado, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information This study evaluates the effect of the use of nasal CPAP in the cardiac function, measured by strain and TEI index, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea and obesity. In order to do so, 76 patients will be studied, half will use sham CPAP and half will use therapeutic CPAP for three months, with ecocardiogram, laboratory studies, ambulatory monitoring of arterial tension and sleep study before and after CPAP use. Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Myocardial Dysfunction Echocardiography Obesity Device: Sham CPAP Device: Therapeutic CPAP The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disease characterized by repeated episodes of partial o total obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. It affects 3.2% of adults in Mexico City. These patients have a higher risk of suffering traffic accidents, cardiovascular disea Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

Sleep Apnea And Diabetes

Tweet Sleep Apnoea, also called sleep apnea, is a common breathing disorder that affects many people whilst they sleep, could be an early warning that diabetes development is underway. Numerous medical studies have linked obstructive sleep apnoea with greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. According to experts, side effects directly related to sleep apnoea could influence the metabolism of people as they sleep. The condition is surprisingly common, to the extent that sleep apnoea has been termed: ‘the silent epidemic’. Sleep apnoea affects as many as one-tenth of middle-aged men, and manifests itself as an interruption of breathing during the hours of sleep. The correlation between sleep and diabetes is well-proven, with interruptions to deep sleep a key part of diabetes risk. Obesity makes both diabetes and sleep apnoea more likely. Why does sleep apnea damage the body and lead to greater risk of diabetes? Sleep apnoea is thought to be dangerous because it affects the concentration of oxygen within the bloodstream. It also plays havoc with sleep patterns, and can lead to daytime fatigue in more serious cases. The actual mechanism that causes sleep apnoea to influence oxygen If I have sleep apnea, am I a diabetic? Not necessarily, but having sleep apnoea does mean an increased risk of developing diabetes. Is OSAS the same as sleep apnea? OSAS stands for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome. What are the symptoms of Sleep Apnea? Sleep Apnoea occurs when an obstruction gets in the way of air entering the lungs. These short periods of stopping breathing are generally limited to a less than 10 seconds, and can occur often during the night. Generally, the brain works the sleeping person up when apnoea occurs, often with a snore or snort. How serious is Sleep Apnea? Exp Continue reading >>

Poor Sleep Has Been Linked To Adverse Health And Functioning Outcomes Including Poor Glycemic Control (kim Et Al. , 2013;

Poor Sleep Has Been Linked To Adverse Health And Functioning Outcomes Including Poor Glycemic Control (kim Et Al. , 2013;

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients experie- nce a range of illness related problems such as extreme thirst and co- mplications as a result of poor glycemic control. While health psycholo- gists commonly focus on self-management issues (e.g., medication adhere- nce, eating and exercise behaviour), prevalent sleep problems in this population should also receive more attention. Patients with T2DM often present with sleep distu- rbances (Cuellar & Ratcliffe, 2008) including delayed sleep onset, fre- quent awakening, rest- lessness, and subsequent daytime sleepiness (Ink- ster et al. , 2013). Obstru- ctive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of the most common sleep disorders in patients with type 2 diabetes (Cass, Alonso, Islam, & Weller, 2013), leading to sleep disru-ptions and nocturnal arousals. Poor sleep has been linked to adverse health and functioning outcomes including poor glycemic control (Kim et al. , 2013; Ohkuma et al. , 2013) and reduced quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes (Chasens & Luyster, 2016; Seligowski et al. , 2013). There are few studies to examine sleep problems in T2DM in tropical settings where consistent day length, light–dark cycle and temperatures may influence wake time schedule and hence sleep patterns (Reutrakul et al. , 2015). In tropical countries, consistent long day length may encourage later bedtime and higher temperatures (year round average 27-34ºC) could compromise sleep (Reutrakul et al. , 2015). To address this gap, we examined the rates and patterns of sleep problems in a sample of adults with T2DM and their associations with sociodemographic and clinical parameters. The focus of this research was on insomnia (i.e. , difficulty falling and/or staying asleep), daytime sleepiness and sleep debt (i.e. , measurable sl Continue reading >>

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