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Diabetes Mellitus Tagalog

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

What Is Okra? Okra, also known as “lady’s fingers” and “gumbo,” is a green flowering plant. Okra belongs to the same plant family as hibiscus and cotton. The term “okra” most commonly refers to the edible seedpods of the plant. Okra has long been favored as a food for the health-conscious. It contains potassium, vitamin B, vitamin C, folic acid, and calcium. It’s low in calories and has a high dietary fiber content. Recently, a new benefit of including okra in your diet is being considered. Okra has been suggested to help manage blood sugar in cases of type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Incidences of diabetes diagnoses are only increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The verdict is out on whether okra can be used successfully as a direct diabetes treatment. However, the okra plant does have many proven health benefits. Read on to see if okra could be a viable part of your diabetes treatment plan. Studies on Okra and Diabetes Medical research on okra for diabetes management is still in early stages. We do know that according to one study, okra water improved the blood sugar levels of pregnant rats that had gestational diabetes. Roasted okra seeds, which have long been used in Turkey to treat diabetes, have also been studied and proven to have a positive effect on lowering blood sugar. Okra Benefit #1: Dietary Fiber Okra is high in fiber. Eight medium-sized pods are estimated to contain 3 grams of fiber. This bulk fiber quality has several benefits. It helps digestion, cuts hunger cravings, and keeps those who eat it fuller for longer. Foods that are high in fiber content are an important part of dietary treatment options for diabetes. Increased dietary fiber intake has been shown to promote better glycemic control a Continue reading >>

171_teaching Diabetes: Module 01

171_teaching Diabetes: Module 01

Have you ever tried to introduce diabetes to a newly diagnosed patient and found yourself at a loss? Do you stumble trying to explain the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Are you frustrated by the disconnect between your own understanding of diabetes and your ability to explain it? You are not alone! Diabetes educators specialize in the management of diabetes and effectively teaching it to patients. As a healthcare professional you have learned the basics of diabetes mellitus, but not how to teach a patient who lives with it. Simplifying pathophysiology, medication usage, blood glucose monitoring, meal planning, and overall management of the disease is daunting but it is a skill you can acquire with practice. Teaching patients to take their prescribed medications correctly may be as important as the medication itself because, without a good understanding, patients may take it incorrectly, with poor outcomes. Studies confirm positive behavioral and economic outcomes of outpatient diabetes education programs on self-care (Brown, 1990). Patients with diabetes who have received diabetes education have better A1C glycosylated hemoglobin levels, fewer emergency department (ED) visits, and better overall health compared to those with diabetes who never received education. Clearly diabetes education matters. With over 29.1 million Americans9.3% of the United States populationdiagnosed with diabetes and another 86 million with prediabetes, there are a lot of people needing diabetes education (ADA, 2014). Diabetes is steadily increasing in incidence and prevalence in the United States and remains the seventh leading or contributing cause of death; further, it represents almost 26% of adults age 65 and older, which is 1 out of every 4 elders. Diabetes in youth age 2 Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (gdm)

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (gdm)

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition in which a hormone made by the placenta prevents the body from using insulin effectively. Glucose builds up in the blood instead of being absorbed by the cells. Unlike type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes is not caused by a lack of insulin, but by other hormones produced during pregnancy that can make insulin less effective, a condition referred to as insulin resistance. Gestational diabetic symptoms disappear following delivery. Approximately 3 to 8 percent of all pregnant women in the United States are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Although the cause of GDM is not known, there are some theories as to why the condition occurs. The placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water, and also produces a variety of hormones to maintain the pregnancy. Some of these hormones (estrogen, cortisol, and human placental lactogen) can have a blocking effect on insulin. This is called contra-insulin effect, which usually begins about 20 to 24 weeks into the pregnancy. As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced, and the risk of insulin resistance becomes greater. Normally, the pancreas is able to make additional insulin to overcome insulin resistance, but when the production of insulin is not enough to overcome the effect of the placental hormones, gestational diabetes results. Although any woman can develop GDM during pregnancy, some of the factors that may increase the risk include the following: Overweight or obesity Family history of diabetes Having given birth previously to an infant weighing greater than 9 pounds Age (women who are older than 25 are at a greater risk for developing gestational diabetes than younger women) Race (women who are African-American, American Indian, Asian American, Hi Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

So, diabetes is a very common disease. It affects nearly 10 percent of the population and more than 25 percent, or one in four people over the age of 65 have diabetes. But what exactly is diabetes mellitus? Let me start by going through a couple of scenarios. Now the first scenario I wanna talk about is that of Joe here. So let me bring in Joe. Now Joe is a 15 year old boy. Over the past few months Joe just really hasn't been feeling well. He says, you know it's hard to kind of put his finger on it, but he's in general been a little bit more tired and fatigued than usual. In fact, it's caused him to lose a little bit of weight and he's already kind of a skinny guy to begin with, so that's definitely something that's abnormal for him. And you know his mother's with him and his mother says you know "Joe's been, it's kinda been odd, "Joe's been carrying around this water bottle "with him everywhere for the past few months. "He seems to just be drinking "liters upon liters of water a day." And when asked about it Joe acknowledges this, he says "Yeah, I have been a little bit "more thirsty than usual." and because of this, he says, "You know, I've been going to bathroom, "I've been needing to urinate all the time." Now, let's contrast Joe to Bruce here. Now, Bruce is very different than Joe. Bruce is a 45 year old gentleman. And he's come in to the doctor for his annual physical and when he goes to the doctor he says, "You know doc, I've been feeling pretty good. "I mean, yeah, maybe I've packed on "a few extra pounds around the waist, "but in general I'm feeling pretty healthy." Now, say both Joe over here and Bruce are seeing the same family practice doctor. You know for Joe, he says "Yeah, I am worried "about this thirst and urination and the losing weight. "I think we sh Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Tagalog, Translation, English-tagalog Dictionary

Diabetes In Tagalog, Translation, English-tagalog Dictionary

translation and definition "diabetes", English-Tagalog Dictionary online The inability of the body to produce, or the inability to metabolize, the human hormone insulin. Diabetes insipidus, usually a disorder of the pituitary gland, leading to a form of type II diabetes. A group of metabolic diseases whereby a person (or other animal) has high blood sugar due to an inability to produce, or inability to metabolize, sufficient quantities of the hormone insulin. Diabetes insipidus, a condition characterized by excessive thirst and excretion of large amounts of severely diluted urine. An heterogeneous group of disorders in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are elevated. a polygenic disease characterized by abnormally high glucose levels in the blood; any of several metabolic disorders marked by excessive urination and persistent thirst en The fact is, many who are slim suffer from mental and emotional stress, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and other conditions that are aggravated by a lack of enough exercise. tl Ang totoo, maraming balingkinitan ang katawan ang dumaranas ng mental at emosyonal na kaigtingan, mga sakit sa puso, diyabetis, at iba pang sakit na lumalala dahil sa hindi pag-eehersisyo nang sapat. en Sophisticated techniques are being used to identify genes that predispose people to weight gain and to diseases like diabetes. tl Gumagamit ng masalimuot na mga pamamaraan upang matukoy ang mga gene na nagiging sanhi ng sobrang timbang ng mga tao at ng mga sakit tulad ng diyabetis. en How the Bible Can Help Diabetes Sufferers tl Kung Paano Makatutulong ang Bibliya sa mga May Diyabetis en When the doctor told me that I was at high risk for diabetes! tl Nang sabihin sa akin ng doktor na nanganganib akong magkadiyabetis! en It is a common misconception that eating Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

First, the formal name for what we commonly call diabetes is diabetes mellitus, which translates from the Greek as making lots of urine with sugar in it or making lots of sweet urine. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are diseases that have in common, sugar in the urine and the increased urination. When there are high amounts of sugar in the blood, the kidneys filter sugar into the urine. Sugar can be measured in the urine through a lab test commonly called a urinalysis. Urine dipsticks are also used to show sugar in the urine. Patients who develop diabetes mellitus most commonly have initial symptoms of increased thirst, increased urination and blurred vision due to high amounts of sugar in the fluids of the eye. Type 1 diabetes results from a rheumatoid-like autoimmune reaction in which one's own body attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that normally produce insulin. Type 1 is a disease in which the patient in a relatively short time has no insulin production. All patients with type 1 diabetes can also develop a serious metabolic disorder called ketoacidosis when their blood sugars are high and there is not enough insulin in their body. Ketoacidosis can be fatal unless treated as an emergency with hydration and insulin. Type 1 was once commonly called juvenile diabetes mellitus because it is most commonly diagnosed in children. It should be noted that even older adults in their 60s have occasionally been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus. One should think of it as a disease of high blood sugars due to a deficiency of insulin production. It must be treated by administration of insulin. Insulin is given at least twice a day and is often given four times a day in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes rates are growing dramatically Continue reading >>

Diabetes Overview | Health Navigator Nz

Diabetes Overview | Health Navigator Nz

Diabetes occurs when there is too much glucose, a type of sugar, in the blood. If not controlled, high blood glucose levels will eventually lead to damage to many parts of the body. Blood-sugar levels are normally controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. High blood glucose levels may be caused by: insulin deficiency when the pancreas is not able to make enough insulin, or insulin resistance when your body is not responding to insulin as it should. Insulin is a natural hormone which helps glucose enter the body's cells where it is used for energy. If there is not enough insulin or it is not working well to act as a key to open the channel for glucose to enter the cells, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. the normal level of glucose in the body is between 4 and 8 mmol/L. when someone has diabetes, their body is not able to control their blood glucose levels and keep it in the safe range. If the level is too low, hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) occurs and people feel sweaty, weak and dizzy and need to eat some glucose right away. If too high, hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose) can occur. Symptoms depend on how high or rapidly the level changes but can include excess thirst, passing excess urine, blurred vision etc. There are three main types of diabetes and one type of prediabetes. Type 1 diabetes this iscaused by insulin deficiency. It often starts in childhood and can appear with little warning. Approximately 10% of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.Read more about Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes affecting about 90% of all people with diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the main problem is insulin resistance, although insulin deficiency can also develop. Approximately 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 dia Continue reading >>

Pathophysiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Pathophysiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Kathy Silliman, RN As we learn more about the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus, we find that there is more yet to be discovered. Diabetes mellitus is a syndrome with disordered metabolism and inappropriate hyperglycemia due to either a deficiency of insulin secretion or to a combination of insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion to compensate. Type 1 diabetes is due to pancreatic islet B cell destruction predominantly by an autoimmune process, and these persons are prone to ketoacidosis. While type 2 diabetes is the more prevalent form and results from insulin resistance with a defect in compensatory insulin secretion. Diabetes can lead to serious complications, resulting in multiple diseases or disorders that affect multiple systems that may result in premature death. Normal Pathology of the Human Body In people that are healthy, the pancreas, an organ located behind the liver and stomach, secretes digestive enzymes and the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream to control the amount of glucose in the body. The release of insulin into the blood lowers the level of blood glucose (simple sugars from food) by allowing glucose to enter the body cells, where it is metabolized. If blood glucose levels get too low, the pancreas secretes glucagon to stimulate the release of glucose from the liver. Right after a meal, glucose and amino acids are absorbed directly into the bloodstream, and blood glucose levels rise sharply. The rise in blood glucose levels signals important cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, to secrete insulin, which pours into the bloodstream. Within 20 minutes after a meal insulin rises to its peak level. Insulin enables glucose to enter cells in the body, particularly muscle and liver cells. Here, insulin and other hormones Continue reading >>

Phd Public Health, Suez Canal University, Egypt

Phd Public Health, Suez Canal University, Egypt

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. The term diabetes mellitus describes a metabolic disorder of multiple aetiology characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia with disturbances of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The effects of diabetes mellitus include long–term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs. Diabetes mellitus may present with characteristic symptoms such as thirst, polyuria, blurring of vision, and weight loss. In its most severe forms, ketoacidosis or a non–ketotic hyperosmolar state may develop and lead to stupor, coma and, in absence of effective treatment, death. Often symptoms are not severe, or may be absent, and consequently hyperglycaemia sufficient to cause pathological and functional changes may be present for a long time before the diagnosis is made. The long–term effects of diabetes mellitus include progressive development of the specific complications of retinopathy with potential blindness, nephropathy that may lead to renal failure, and/or neuropathy with risk of foot ulcers, amputation, Charcot joints, and features of autonomic dysfunction, including sexual dysfunction. People with diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular disease. The development of diabetes is projected to reach pandemic proportions over the next10-20 years. International Diabetes Federation (IDF) data indicate that by the year 2025, the number of people affected will reach 333 million –90% of these people will have Type 2 diabetes. In most Western societies, the overall prevalence has reach Continue reading >>

Herbal And Natural Therapies

Herbal And Natural Therapies

Tweet Many common herbs and spices are claimed to have blood sugar lowering properties that make them useful for people with or at high risk of type 2 diabetes. A number of clinical studies have been carried out in recent years that show potential links between herbal therapies and improved blood glucose control, which has led to an increase in people with diabetes using these more 'natural' ingredients to help manage their condition. What herbal therapies are available? Plant-based therapies that have been shown in some studies to have anti-diabetic properties include: While such therapies are commonly used in ayurvedic and oriental medicine for treating serious conditions such as diabetes, many health experts in the west remain sceptical about their reported medical benefits. In fact, because certain herbs, vitamins and supplements may interact with diabetes medications (including insulin) and increase their hypoglycemic effects, it is often argued that use of natural therapies could reduce blood sugars to dangerously low levels and raise the risk of other diabetes complications. Whatever your intended reasons for using these specific herbs, you must always discuss your plans with your doctor and diabetes healthcare team first to ensure they are safe for your condition and determine a suitable dose. Further herbal therapies The herbs and plant derivatives listed below have been employed traditionally by native people in the treatment of diabetes, in the areas in which they grow. Many suffer from an inadequate knowledge base. Allium Allium sativum is more commonly known as garlic, and is thought to offer antioxidant properties and micro-circulatory effects. Although few studies have directly linked allium with insulin and blood glucose levels, results have been positiv Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes mellitus is a disease that prevents your body from properly using the energy from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs in one of the following situations: The pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) produces little insulin or no insulin at all. (Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone, produced by the beta cells of the pancreas, which helps the body use sugar for energy.) -Or- The pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin made does not work as it should. This condition is called insulin resistance. To better understand diabetes, it helps to know more about how the body uses food for energy (a process called metabolism). Your body is made up of millions of cells. To make energy, the cells need food in a very simple form. When you eat or drink, much of your food is broken down into a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose provides the energy your body needs for daily activities. The blood vessels and blood are the highways that transport sugar from where it is either taken in (the stomach) or manufactured (in the liver) to the cells where it is used (muscles) or where it is stored (fat). Sugar cannot go into the cells by itself. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, which serves as the helper, or the "key," that lets sugar into the cells for use as energy. When sugar leaves the bloodstream and enters the cells, the blood sugar level is lowered. Without insulin, or the "key," sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. This causes sugar to rise. Too much sugar in the blood is called "hyperglycemia" (high blood sugar) or diabetes. What are the types of diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2: Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (beta cells) are damaged. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Translation - English-tagalog Dictionary

Diabetes Mellitus - Translation - English-tagalog Dictionary

en A visit to the doctor confirmed that Ken had more than the fluhe also had Type 1 diabetes mellitusdiabetes, for short. tl Nang magpatingin siya sa doktor, naging malinaw na hindi lamang trangkaso ang sakit ni Kenmayroon din siyang Type 1 diabetes mellitusdiyabetis, sa maikli. en The term diabetes mellitus comes from a Greek word meaning to siphon and a Latin word meaning sweet like honey. tl Ang terminong diabetes mellitus ay galing sa isang salitang Griego na nangangahulugang higupin at isalin at isang salitang Latin na nangangahulugang matamis na parang pulot-pukyutan. en Typical features include visual impairment leading to blindness, obesity, extra fingers and/or toes, developmental delay, coordination problems, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, and kidney abnormalities. tl Ang ilan sa mga sintomas nito ay problema sa paningin na maaaring mauwi sa pagkabulag, sobrang katabaan, sobrang mga daliri sa kamay at/o paa, developmental delay, problema sa pagkilos ng mga bahagi ng katawan, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, at problema sa kidney. en Prevention of Type 2 diabetes mellitus tl Naiiwasan ang Type 2 diabetes mellitus en THE incidence of diabetes mellitus is increasing so quickly that it has become a global epidemic. tl NAPAKABILIS ng pagdami ng mga may diabetes mellitus anupat naging pangglobong epidemya na ito. Showing page 1. Found 5 sentences matching phrase "diabetes mellitus".Found in 1 ms. Translation memories are created by human, but computer aligned, which might cause mistakes. They come from many sources and are not checked. Be warned. Continue reading >>

Ampalaya In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Ampalaya In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Can ampalaya really cure diabetes? Which part (fruit, leaves, or roots) of the ampalaya should people with diabetes take? Lina M., Manila First, let me make one thing straight. Ampalaya (the Tagalog name of Mormodica charantia) cannot cure diabetes, but it can help control the disease. Diabetes millitus is a disorder in which the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood is abnormally high because the pancreas, a gland located behind the stomach, produces little or no insulin or because the bodys cells do not respond appropriately to insulin. There is no known cure for diabetes yet, but we know enough of the disease to be able to control it and prevent its complications (i.e., through proper diet, exercise and medicines). There are two main types of diabetes mellitus: Type 1 and type 2. Most (90-95 percent) diabetes suffers from type 2 (non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus), and it is in this type of the disease where ampalaya has apparent beneficial effects. A substantial number of scientific studies on the effect of ampalaya on blood glucose levels have already been undertaken. The latest of these studies is a 10-year trial, which was conducted by the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD). The study compared ampalaya (Makiling variety) leaves with the anti-diabetes drug glibenclamide. The results of the trial showed that 100 milligrams per kilo dose per day of ampalaya is comparable to 2.8 milligrams of the anti-diabetes drug glibenclamide. This means the action of ampalaya on blood sugar is equivalent to the action of the medicine. In response to the study, the Department of Health (DoH) has elevated the status of ampalaya from a mere nutritional supplement to a real medicine. The blood sugar lowering property of ampalaya is attributed to its Continue reading >>

Diabetes Signs

Diabetes Signs

The symptoms of diabetes can be reduced to three major factors. In the case of type 1 diabetes, these symptoms can develop quickly. However, when it comes to type 2 diabetes, symptoms may be far subtler and develop slower. What are the big three symptoms of diabetes? The three major symptoms of diabetes are: Polyuria - the need to urinate frequently Polydipsia - increased thirst & fluid intake Polyphagia - increased appetite It is common for a number of symptoms to appear together. For example, increased thirst (polydipsia) and an increased need to urinate (polyuria) will often come as a pair. Are there other symptoms of diabetes? The 3Ps of diabetes are a good indication that blood glucose levels may be too high. However, these symptoms may not always be obvious and it’s important to be aware of the other symptoms which may also be presented. In children and young adults, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes (including the 3Ps) develop more quickly. In type 2 diabetes, symptoms of diabetes may appear gradually, sometimes over a period of years, and may become more noticeable on some days and less noticeable on other days. What happens when a person develops diabetes? The 3Ps of diabetes are caused by the effect of diabetes on the body. If the level of glucose in the blood becomes too high, excess glucose is removed from the blood by the kidneys and excreted via the urine (glycosuria). This results in greater urine production and causes the patient to urinate frequently. Water held in the cells is required to replace lost blood volume, and thus causes dehydration and thirst. Increased hunger develops if the body has difficulty getting glucose from the blood into cells. This can occur if the body has insufficient insulin or if the body cannot respond to its insulin sufficie Continue reading >>

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