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Diabetes Mellitus Meaning

Introduction To Diabetes Mellitus

Introduction To Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by chronic elevation of glucose in the blood. It arises because the body is unable to produce enough insulin for its own needs, either because of impaired insulin secretion, impaired insulin action, or both. Diabetes affects some 300 million people world-wide, and is on the increase. Chronic exposure to high blood glucose is a leading cause of renal failure, visual loss and a range of other types of tissue damage. Diabetes also predisposes to arterial disease, not least because it is often accompanied by hypertension, lipid disorders and obesity. Many cases of diabetes and almost all of its unwanted long-term consequences are potentially avoidable, but this will require intervention at a societal as well as at a medical level. This section of Diapedia offers an introduction to the history of diabetes, its clinical presentation, its current classification and its global epidemiology. We also introduce some of the psychological and societal aspects of diabetes, including the 'hot topics' that dominate the media, and offer an overview of current areas of research interest. All these topics are considered in greater detail elsewhere in Diapedia, and we hope you will explore them further. History of diabetes Diabetes was considered a disease of the wealthy in ancient India, and was known as Madhumeha (sweet urine disease); it was observed that ants were attracted to the urine. The ancient Greeks coined the term "diabetes", meaning excessive urination with dehydration, but neither they nor the Romans appreciated that the urine contained sugar; "diabetes" was considered a kidney disease until the 18th century. The sweet taste of the urine was known to Avicenna (~1000 AD) and to Thomas Willis in the 17th centu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

diabetes mel·li·tus (mə-lī′təs, mĕl′ĭ-) [New Latin diabētēs mellītus, literally, honey-sweet diabetes (so called because excessive glucose is excreted in the urine and the resulting sweet taste of the urine was used in diagnosis) : Medieval Latin diabētēs, diabetes; see diabetes + Latin mellītus, honey-sweet (Latin mel, mell-, honey; see melit- in Indo-European roots + -ītus, adjectival suffix).] American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. diabe′tes mel′li•tus (ˈmɛl ɪ təs) n. either of two chronic forms of diabetes in which insulin does not effectively transport glucose from the bloodstream: a rapidly developing form, affecting children and young adults, in which the body does not produce enough insulin and insulin must therefore be injected (juvenile-onset diabetes) or a slowly developing form in which the body's tissues become unable to use insulin effectively (adult-onset diabetes). [< New Latin: literally, sweet diabetes] diabetes mellitus A condition characterized by frequent thirst and urination, caused by excess sugar in the blood. Results from a lack of insulin. Noun 1. diabetes mellitus - diabetes caused by a relative or absolute deficiency of insulin and characterized by polyuria; "when doctors say `diabetes' they usually mean `diabetes mellitus'"DMdiabetes - a polygenic disease characterized by abnormally high glucose levels in the blood; any of several metabolic disorders marked by excessive urination and persistent thirstautoimmune diabetes, growth-onset diabetes, IDDM, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, juvenile diabetes, juvenile-onset diabetes, ketoacido Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus Definition Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the pancreas no longer produces enough insulin or cells stop responding to the insulin that is produced, so that glucose in the blood cannot be absorbed into the cells of the body. Symptoms include frequent urination, lethargy, excessive thirst, and hunger. The treatment includes changes in diet, oral medications, and in some cases, daily injections of insulin. Description Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes serious health complications including renal (kidney) failure, heart disease, stroke, and blindness. Approximately 17 million Americans have diabetes. Unfortunately, as many as one-half are unaware they have it. Every cell in the human body needs energy in order to function. The body's primary energy source is glucose, a simple sugar resulting from the digestion of foods containing carbohydrates (sugars and starches). Glucose from the digested food circulates in the blood as a ready energy source for any cells that need it. Insulin is a hormone or chemical produced by cells in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. Insulin bonds to a receptor site on the outside of cell and acts like a key to open a doorway into the cell through which glucose can enter. Some of the glucose can be converted to concentrated energy sources like glycogen or fatty acids and saved for later use. When there is not enough insulin produced or when the doorway no longer recognizes the insulin key, glucose stays in the blood rather entering the cells. The body will attempt to dilute the high level of glucose in the blood, a condition called hyperglycemia, by drawing water out of the cells and into the bloodstream in an effort to dilute the sugar and excrete it in the urine. It is not unusual for p Continue reading >>

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at the risk of death? Yes, absolutely. Every single person on the planet with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes will die. But don’t worry, so will everyone else - it is all just a matter of time. The real question should be are they at risk of a premature death due to their conditions, and unfortunately the answer to that is also yes for various reasons. The first reason is the impact of long-term high blood glucose levels, including damage to large and small blood vessels, which can lead to heart attack and stroke, and problems with the kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves. Another risk often overlooked is overdosing on insulin. Insulin is a highly dangerous hormone, taking too much will cause a person to slip into a hypoglycemic coma which can lead to death. Alternatively, it is possible to die from not getting enough (or any insulin), due to Diabetic ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. Diabetes mellitus is a disease caused by deficiency or diminished effectiveness of endogenous insulin. It is characterised by hyperglycaemia, deranged metabolism and sequelae predominantly affecting the vasculature. The main types of diabetes mellitus are: Type 1 diabetes mellitus: results from the body's failure to produce sufficient insulin. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: results from resistance to the insulin, often initially with normal or increased levels of circulating insulin. Gestational diabetes: pregnant women who have never had diabetes before but who have high blood glucose levels during pregnancy are said to have gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects about 4% of all pregnant women. It may precede development of type 2 (or rarely type 1) diabetes. Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) includes several forms of diabetes with monogenetic defects of beta-cell function (impaired insulin secretion), usually manifesting as mild hyperglycaemia at a young age and usually inherited in an autosomal-dominant manner.[1] Secondary diabetes: accounts for only 1-2% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Causes include: Pancreatic disease: cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatectomy, carcinoma of the pancreas. Endocrine: Cushing's syndrome, acromegaly, thyrotoxicosis, phaeochromocytoma, glucagonoma. Drug-induced: thiazide diuretics, corticosteroids, atypical antipsychotics, antiretroviral protease inhibitors. Congenital lipodystrophy. Aca Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Overview: Types of Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common disease in which the blood sugar (glucose) is abnormally elevated. Normally, the body obtains glucose from food, and additional glucose is made in the liver. The pancreas produces insulin, which enables glucose to enter cells and serve as fuel for the body. In patients with diabetes, glucose accumulates in the blood instead of being properly transported into cells. Excess blood sugar is a serious problem that may damage the blood vessels, heart, kidneys, and other organs. About 5-10% of patients with diabetes are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus, an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, causing the organ to no longer produce insulin. Type 1 DM most commonly occurs in children or young adults, and the incidence of new cases is increasing. Approximately 90-95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes mellitus, which occurs when the body becomes unable to use the insulin produced by the pancreas. This condition is also called insulin resistance. The prevalence of type 2 DM is increasing dramatically worldwide. In the past, type 2 DM was associated with adulthood; however, it is rapidly increasing in children because of the rise in childhood obesity. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs during pregnancy. This form of diabetes usually resolves after delivery, but patients with GDM have an increased risk of developing type 2 DM later in life. Causes and Risk Factors Type 1 DM is an autoimmune disorder and the exact cause is unknown. Causes may include genetic factors, environmental factors, and viruses. For type 2 DM, the major risk factors include a family history of type 2 DM, increased age, obesity, and a sed Continue reading >>

An Amalgam Knn To Predict Diabetes Mellitus

An Amalgam Knn To Predict Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract: Medical Data mining extracts hidden patterns from medical data. This paper presents the development of an amalgam model for classifying Pima Indian diabetic database (PIDD). This amalgam model combines k-means with k-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) with multi-sep preprocessing. Many researchers have found that the KNN algorithm accomplishes very good performance in their experiments on different data sets. In this amalgam model, the quality of the data is improved by removing noisy data thereby helping to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the KNN algorithm.k-means clustering is used to identify and eliminate incorrectly classified instances. The missing values are replaced by means and medians. A fine tuned classification is done using k-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) by taking the correctly clustered instance with preprocessed subset as inputs for the KNN. The best choice of k depends upon the data. Generally, larger values of k reduce the effect of noise on the classification. A good k is selected by cross-validation technique. The aim of this paper is determining the value of k for PIDD for better classification accuracy using amalgam KNN. Experimental results signify the proposed amalgam KNN along with preprocessing produces best result for different k values. If k value is more the proposed model obtained the classification accuracy of 97.4%. Ten fold cross validation with larger k value produces better classification accuracy for PIDD. The results are also compared with simple KNN and cascaded K-MEANS and KNN for the same k values. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

A disease characterized by excretion of large amount of severely diluted urine, which cannot be reduced when fluid intake is reduced. It is generally related to a tumor or insult to the pituitary gland, where the hormonal signals the pituitary gives to the kidneys break down, and the kidneys do not conserve water, but express all water as urine. This is a rather rare disease. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Diabetes Mellitus (dm)

Years of poorly controlled hyperglycemia lead to multiple, primarily vascular complications that affect small vessels (microvascular), large vessels (macrovascular), or both. (For additional detail, see Complications of Diabetes Mellitus.) Microvascular disease underlies 3 common and devastating manifestations of diabetes mellitus: Microvascular disease may also impair skin healing, so that even minor breaks in skin integrity can develop into deeper ulcers and easily become infected, particularly in the lower extremities. Intensive control of plasma glucose can prevent or delay many of these complications but may not reverse them once established. Macrovascular disease involves atherosclerosis of large vessels, which can lead to Immune dysfunction is another major complication and develops from the direct effects of hyperglycemia on cellular immunity. Patients with diabetes mellitus are particularly susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes mellitus is a disease that prevents your body from properly using the energy from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs in one of the following situations: The pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) produces little insulin or no insulin at all. (Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone, produced by the beta cells of the pancreas, which helps the body use sugar for energy.) -Or- The pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin made does not work as it should. This condition is called insulin resistance. To better understand diabetes, it helps to know more about how the body uses food for energy (a process called metabolism). Your body is made up of millions of cells. To make energy, the cells need food in a very simple form. When you eat or drink, much of your food is broken down into a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose provides the energy your body needs for daily activities. The blood vessels and blood are the highways that transport sugar from where it is either taken in (the stomach) or manufactured (in the liver) to the cells where it is used (muscles) or where it is stored (fat). Sugar cannot go into the cells by itself. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, which serves as the helper, or the "key," that lets sugar into the cells for use as energy. When sugar leaves the bloodstream and enters the cells, the blood sugar level is lowered. Without insulin, or the "key," sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. This causes sugar to rise. Too much sugar in the blood is called "hyperglycemia" (high blood sugar) or diabetes. What are the types of diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2: Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (beta cells) are damaged. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes Mellitus

Canine Diabetes Mellitus

Sign up or Log in Most diabetic dogs have diabetes mellitus type 1, meaning the body fails to make enough insulin to serve its needs. After treatment for diabetes begins, periodic blood and urine tests may be recommended to help ensure that the insulin dosage is right for your dog. Many dogs live active, happy lives once their diabetes is well regulated. However, insulin therapy and regular monitoring at home and by your veterinarian are necessary for the rest of your dog’s life. What Is Diabetes Mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is an illness caused by the body’s inability to either make or use insulin, which is a hormone produced and released by specialized cells in the pancreas. Insulin permits the body’s cells to take sugar (glucose) from the blood and use it for their metabolism and other functions. Diabetes mellitus develops when the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or when the body’s cells are unable to use available insulin to take glucose from the blood. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (referred to as “insulin dependent” diabetes) occurs when the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes (more common in cats and humans) has been called “relative insulin deficiency”; it occurs when the body’s cells develop “insulin resistance,” meaning that they are unable to effectively use available insulin, or when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but not enough to serve the body’s needs. Most diabetic dogs have type 1 diabetes mellitus. Lifelong administration of insulin is generally required to control this illness. What Are the Clinical Signs of Diabetes in Dogs? Diabetes can exist for a while before it begins to make an animal obviously ill. Clinical signs may vary depending on the stage of disease, but they can include the following: Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

The word Diabetes is well known and it is mostly associated with a disease involving difficulties with sugar. There are actually two unrelated diseases named Diabetes - Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus. This article is to highlight each and to show the differences between the two. Similarities Both diseases are dependent on the action of hormones; Insulin for Diabetes Mellitus and Vasopressin for Diabetes Insipidus. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. Vasopressin is produced by the Hypothalamus and stored in the pituitary gland. Insulin is necessary for the utilization of sugar/glucose. Vasopressin is the hormone that regulates the body’s retention of water. In both the diseases there are variances derived the same way. A lack of or not enough of the hormone and a specific type of the disease is present. A lack of Insulin and the disease is Diabetes Mellitus Type 1. A lack of Vasopressin and the disease is Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus. When the body is unable to use the hormone effectively another condition is present. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2, when the cells are insulin resistant. When the kidneys are insensitive to vasopressin, Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (vasopressin-resistant) is the result. During pregnancy, the body is subjected to a multitude of diverse hormones and chemical reactions, caused mostly by the placenta. This hormonal imbalance can cause a temporary disease that occurs only during the pregnancy. The resistance to Insulin results in gestational diabetes mellitus. A deficiency of vasopressin causes gestagenic diabetes insipidus, also known as gestational diabetes insipidus. With both diseases, the body returns to normal shortly (four to six weeks) after the delivery. Diabetes Insipidus have a fourth condition, with no equivalent in diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Overview Diabetes insipidus is a rare condition where you produce a large amount of urine and often feel thirsty. Diabetes insipidus isn't related to diabetes mellitus (usually just known as diabetes), but it does share some of the same signs and symptoms. The two main symptoms of diabetes insipidus are: passing large amounts of urine, even at night (polyuria) In very severe cases of diabetes insipidus, up to 20 litres of urine can be passed in a day. Read more about the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. When to seek medical advice You should always see your GP if you're feeling thirsty all the time. Although it may not be diabetes insipidus, it should be investigated. Also see your GP if you're: passing more urine than normal – most healthy adults pass urine four to seven times in a 24 hour period passing small amounts of urine at frequent intervals – sometimes, this can occur along with the feeling that you need to pass urine immediately Children tend to urinate more frequently because they have smaller bladders. However, seek medical advice if your child urinates more than 10 times a day. Your GP will be able to carry out a number of tests to help determine what's causing the problem. Read more about diagnosing diabetes insipidus. What causes diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is caused by problems with a hormone called vasopressin (AVP), also called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). AVP plays a key role in regulating the amount of fluid in the body. It's produced by specialist nerve cells in a part of the brain known as the hypothalamus. AVP passes from the hypothalamus to the pituitary gland where it's stored until needed. The pituitary gland releases AVP when the amount of water in the body becomes too low. It helps retain water in the body by reducing the amount Continue reading >>

Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus - Meaning In Marathi

Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus - Meaning In Marathi

Sorry, we did not find an exact match. Suggestions Definitions and Meaning of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in English noun severe diabetes mellitus with an early onset; characterized by polyuria and excessive thirst and increased appetite and weight loss and episodic ketoacidosis; diet and insulin injections are required to control the disease Saregama Carvaan Portable Digital Music Player Browse top entries in English to Marathi dictionary English to Marathi Dictionary: insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus Meaning and definitions of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, translation in Marathi language for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with similar and opposite words. Also find spoken pronunciation of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Marathi and in English language. Tags for the entry "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" What insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus means in Marathi, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus meaning in Marathi, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus definition, examples and pronunciation of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Marathi language. Continue reading >>

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