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Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Attack

Diabetes And Your Heart

Diabetes And Your Heart

If you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop coronary heart disease than someone without diabetes. Diabetes causes high levels of glucose in your blood. This is because of a problem with a hormone your pancreas produces called insulin. Insulin is responsible for moving glucose (a type of sugar) from your bloodstream and into the cells of your body for energy. If there little or no insulin being produced, or your body has become resistant to insulin, glucose stays in the bloodstream and can’t move across to your cells to give them energy to work properly. High levels of glucose in your blood can damage the walls of your arteries, and make them more likely to develop fatty deposits (atheroma). If atheroma builds up in your coronary arteries (the arteries that supply oxygen-rich blood to your heart) you will develop coronary heart disease, which can cause angina and heart attack. Types of diabetes Type one diabetes happens when your body cannot make insulin. This type most commonly affects children and young adults, and is a result of your body’s immune system attacking the cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. Type two diabetes occurs when your pancreas isn’t producing enough insulin or your body has become resistant to the insulin it’s producing. Type two diabetes is much more common than type 1 and tends to develop gradually as people get older – usually after the age of 40, but more and more people every year are being diagnosed at a much younger age. It's closely linked with: being overweight, especially if you carry weight around your middle being physically inactive a family history of type 2 diabetes. Some ethnic groups have a much higher rate of diabetes - particularly people of South Asian and African Caribbean origin. Diabetes and your he Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

Weird, whispering symptoms are easy to overlook; how to prevent and recognize this risk for people with diabetes. In a new study of more than 9,000 people, silent heart attacks—with warning signs so quiet or so unusual that people didn’t seek medical help—were nearly as common as classic heart attacks with well-known symptoms like crushing chest pain. And they were almost as lethal in the long run, tripling the odds of dying during the 9-year study compared to people who didn’t have a heart attack of any kind. It’s a wake-up call for anyone at risk for heart disease, but heart experts say people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes should pay particular attention. “People with diabetes are at higher risk for silent heart attacks for several reasons,” says Om P. Ganda, M.D., medical director of the Lipid Clinic at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and an associate clinical professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “High blood sugar can lead to autonomic nerve damage that reduces the ability to feel pain, including heart-attack pain. Your only symptom might be shortness of breath. And people with diabetes are already at two to three time’s higher risk for heart disease than people without diabetes, which also increases the chances for a silent heart attack.” In a 2013 British study of 5,102 people with type 2, heart tests showed that 16%— about one in six—had likely had silent heart attacks. People with type 1 diabetes may also be at higher-than-average risk, Dr. Ganda says, due to nerve damage and overall heart-disease risk. Lead researcher Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, says silent heart attacks are dangerou Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Aaron contacted TheDiabetesCouncil with some questions related to diabetes and heart disease. Aaron is 57 years old. He has had Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Aaron visited his doctor related to swelling in his ankles and feet, shortness of breath, and weight gain. After some tests, the doctor informed him that on top of his Type 2 diabetes, he now has congestive heart failure. He was now wondering why did he have heart disease now and was it because of his diabetes? In order to help Aaron and other people with diabetes understand the connection between diabetes and heart disease and how to prevent it, we decided to look into the specific link between the two diseases. What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease? According to the American Heart Association, there exist a relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: 68% percent of people with diabetes who are aged 65 and older die from heart disease and 16% die of a stroke. People with diabetes are more likely to die from a heart disease than those without diabetes. The National Institute of Health states the following for people with diabetes: They have additional causes of heart disease They are at higher risk of heart disease than those who do not have diabetes They may develop heart disease at a younger age Risk assessment must take into account the major risk factors (cigarette smoking, elevated blood pressure, abnormal serum lipids and lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia) and predisposing risk factors (excess body weight and abdominal obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of CVD). Identification of risk factors is a major first step for developing a plan for risk reduction in persons with diabetes. – Scott M. Grundy et al, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease In two words, the conn Continue reading >>

Health: Health Issue/cause Of Death From Which Famous People Are Suffered/suffering And Their Best Quotation?

Health: Health Issue/cause Of Death From Which Famous People Are Suffered/suffering And Their Best Quotation?

Insomnia, liver and kidney diseases, malaria, migraine, diabetes and heart ailments as some of the 31 health problems. ANY TYPE OF HEALTH ISSUE/CAUSE OF DEATH/INJURY/ETC.... ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM- HEART FAILURE, CORONARY THROMBOSIS DIABETES MELLITUS TENNIS ELBOW INJURY MYASTHENIA GRAVIS & TB(2000) AMYOTROHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS Muhammad Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson's in 1984 at the age of 42 HEAR FAILURE HEART FAILURE, REACTIVE ARTHRITIS SYPHILIS, HEART ATTACK, STROKE Trigeminal Neuralgia Chronic subdural hematoma CARDIAC ARREST BACK INJURY (2010) In 2003, Larry Page, was diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis Three sportsmen who fought and beat Cancer Yuvraj Singh "Beating cancer is personal battle. It was one of the toughest opponents I have faced so far, and I think I did reasonably well. Touch wood." "Cancer doesn’t mean that you’re going to die." "When I was taking chemotherapy, there were a lot of elderly patients, and that would inspire me. I thought, 'If they can be cured, why can't I be?" Lance Armstrong "Before Cancer, I Just Lived. Now I Live Strong." “I want all of you to know that I intend to beat this disease. And further, I intend to ride again as a professional cyclist.” “Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever. That surrender, even the smallest act of giving up, stays with me. So when I feel like quitting, I ask myself, which would I rather live with?” “Giving up was never an option” ‎"Make an obstacle an opportunity, make a negative a positive.” Eric Abidal "Rocks on the Road? Store them all One day you will Build a Castle" "We certainly all have a mission on Earth. Mine is to save peopl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Coronary Heart Disease: A Risk Factor For The Global Epidemic

Diabetes And Coronary Heart Disease: A Risk Factor For The Global Epidemic

International Journal of Hypertension Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 697240, 7 pages 1Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 South First Avenue, Fahey Bldg, Maywood, IL 60153, USA 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48202, USA 3Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago and Vanguard Weiss Memorial Hospital, 4646 North Marine Drive, Chicago, IL 60640, USA Academic Editor: Eoin O'Brien Copyright © 2012 Maguy Chiha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death in the United States and the world. In this we will paper focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for coronary heart disease, review the mechanisms of atherogenesis in diabetics, the impact of hypertension and the treatment goals in diabetics, the guidelines for screening, and review the epidemiologic consequences of diabetes and heart disease on a global scale. The underlying premise to consider diabetes a cardiovascular disease equivalent will be explored as well as the recommendations for screening and cardiac testing for asymptomatic diabetic patients. 1. Introduction Cardiovascular disease is currently responsible for 30% of all deaths worldwide with most of the burden now occurring in developing countries [1]. After a peak around 1968, death from coronary heart disease (CHD) has declined significantly in the United States [2]. Based on a statistical mortality model previously validated in Europe, N Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Causes And Effect

Diabetes Mellitus: Causes And Effect

Disclaimer: This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays. Diabetes Mellitus is considered one of the major health threats diseases that affect people nowadays. It affects both genders male and female within different age group. However, it is mainly occurs as a result of insulin secretion disorder. Every person is different, so Diabetes Mellitus treatment will be tailored to needs. There are lists of common drugs prescribed in Bahrain clinics which are along with a proper diet and exercise help in controls high glucose level in the blood and also help in reduce complication of Diabetes Mellitus such as kidney damage, eye blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes Mellitus also reduces the risk of a stroke and heart attacks. Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic medical condition, mean in controlled it is restore life time. There are two major type of Diabetes Mellitus known as type 1(IDDM) or Juvenile Diabetes Mellitus and type 2 (NIDM). This topic was selected to obtain more details regarding this disease to help people in elevate their knowledge and awareness about Diabetes Mellitus prevention to reduce its complication. This paper on Diabetes Mellitus in both genders will include general information of the disease, symptoms, causes and risk factors of Diabetes Mellitus. Finally, the effects, treatment and prevention of the disease will also be considered in this paper. Types of Diabetes Mellitus There are two main kinds of Diabetes Mellitus are type 1(IDDN), type 2 (NIDM), and Gestatio Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: A Major Risk Factor For Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes Mellitus: A Major Risk Factor For Cardiovascular Disease

Abundant evidence shows that patients with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for several cardiovascular disorders: coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, cardiomyopathy, and congestive heart failure. Cardiovascular complications are now the leading causes of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. The public health impact of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with diabetes is already enormous and is increasing. Several explanations are behind this increase. First, the incidence of diabetes rises with advancing age, and the number of older people in the United States is growing rapidly. Second, insulin treatment for persons with type 1 diabetes has prolonged their lives significantly, and with each year of additional life comes an increased risk for CVD complications. Third, type 2 diabetes occurs at an earlier age in obese and overweight persons, and the prevalence of obesity is rising in the United States. The risk for diabetes in overweight persons is heightened by physical inactivity; unfortunately, the majority of Americans engage in little regular or sustained physical activity. Fourth, the populations that are particularly susceptible to diabetes—African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Asians—are growing in this country. Fifth, improved medical care, particularly when extended to susceptible populations, will bring an increasing number of patients with type 2 diabetes into the medical care system. All of these factors will lead to an absolute increase in the number of patients who will require medical intervention to prevent the complications of diabetes. Diabetes has long been recognized to be an independent risk factor for CVD. Prospective studies, such as the Framingham, Honolulu Continue reading >>

Silent Heart Attack

Silent Heart Attack

A heart attack that does not produce the hallmark symptoms of chest pain and difficulty breathing. It is estimated that as many as 4 million Americans have had silent heart attacks, and diabetes raises the risk of having one. A heart attack, also known as a myocardial infarction, occurs when low blood flow to the heart starves it of oxygen, damaging it. Most heart attacks are caused by a blood clot that blocks one of the coronary arteries, the arteries that carry blood and oxygen to the heart muscle. A clot most often forms in a coronary artery that has been narrowed by atherosclerotic plaque. Risk factors for heart attacks include a family history of heart attack, being male, diabetes, older age, high blood pressure, smoking, and blood lipid abnormalities, especially high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels and low HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels. Typically, a heart attack produces chest pain, which may radiate to the arms, shoulders, neck, teeth, jaw, abdomen, or back. Other common symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, and anxiety. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek medical care immediately. But people with diabetes may not feel these symptoms due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve disease), which can damage the nerves that control the heart, as well as mask the chest and back pain that usually accompanies an attack. Continue reading >>

Clinical Research Study Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Failure

Clinical Research Study Diabetes Mellitus And Heart Failure

Abstract Epidemiologic and clinical data from the last 2 decades have shown that the prevalence of heart failure in diabetes is very high, and the prognosis for patients with heart failure is worse in those with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Experimental data suggest that various mechanisms contribute to the impairment in systolic and diastolic function in patients with diabetes, and there is an increased recognition that these patients develop heart failure independent of the presence of coronary artery disease or its associated risk factors. In addition, current clinical data demonstrated that treatment with the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin reduced hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. This review article summarizes recent data on the prevalence, prognosis, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies to treat patients with diabetes and heart failure. Funding: This work was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The authors received no direct compensation related to the development of the manuscript. Manuscript editorial support was provided by Marissa Buttaro, MPH, RPh, of Envision Scientific Solutions, which was contracted and funded by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Conflict of Interest: ML has received speaker fees from Amgen, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Novo Nordisk, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, and Servier; is an advisory board member for Amgen, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Merck Sharp & Dohme, and Roche; and has received research support from Boehringer Ingelheim. NM has received speaker fees from Amgen, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Lilly, Merck S Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes Mellitus And Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is rising at an alarming rate. In the United States, 23.6 million people, or 7.8% of the population, have diabetes mellitus, with 1.6 million new cases diagnosed annually [ 1 ]. Over 200 million people are affected worldwide with diabetes mellitus [ 2 ]. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Despite a marked decline in cardiovascular disease related deaths over the past several decades, a smaller reduction has occurred in diabetics compared to non diabetics [ 3 ]. Diabetes mellitus remains a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is widely recognized as a coronary artery disease risk equivalent [ 4 ]. It is associated with a 2 to 4 times higher risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as an increased risk of mortality by up to 3 times [ 5 , 6 ]. Epidemiological studies of diabetes mellitus have shown that gender, age, and ethnic background are important factors when considering the development of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Given similar levels of fasting glucose and proteinuria, women with diabetes mellitus at diagnosis tend to be older and more likely hypertensive. Among those diagnosed at younger ages, women are more likely than men to be obese [ 7 ]. Compared to the non-diabetic population, the overall mortality from acute myocardial infarction in the diabetic population was 4 times higher among men and 7 times higher among women [ 8 ]. Despite a similar rate of myocardial infarction and chronic heart disease, the rate of transluminal coronary angioplasty and coronary bypass grafting was doubled in diabetic male patients [ 9 ]. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NDIC), af Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart disease is common in people with diabetes. Data from the National Heart Association from 2012 shows 65% of people with diabetes will die from some sort of heart disease or stroke. In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the condition is more common in those with type 2 diabetes. In fact, heart disease is the number one cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes. The Framingham Study was one of the first pieces of evidence to show that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to heart disease than those people who did not have diabetes. The Framingham Study looked at generations of people, including those with diabetes, to try to determine the health risk factors for developing heart disease. It showed that multiple health factors -- including diabetes -- could increase the possibility of developing heart disease. Aside from diabetes, other health problems associated with heart disease include high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of early heart disease. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is 2 to 4 times higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. For example, one medical study found that people with d Continue reading >>

Child Health Library

Child Health Library

Topic Overview It's true-diabetes raises your risk of heart disease. That means your risks of heart attack and stroke are higher when you have diabetes. Diabetes is plenty to keep up with as it is. That explains why dealing with both heart risk and diabetes can seem like too much all at once. But it's also true that good heart-health care has a lot in common with good diabetes care. Most healthy choices that help control your diabetes also help your heart. Add a few heart-healthy habits, and you'll lower your heart disease risk. How are heart disease and diabetes connected? Experts do not fully understand how diabetes affects the heart. Heart disease can be caused by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. But genetics and lifestyle may also affect a person's risk. For example, if you smoke, you are at a higher risk for heart and blood vessel disease than someone who does not smoke. Your risk of having heart disease is even higher if you have: High blood pressure, which pushes blood through the arteries with too much force. Over time, this damages the walls of the arteries. High cholesterol, which causes the buildup of a kind of fat inside the blood vessel walls. This buildup can lower blood flow to the heart muscle and raise your risk for a heart attack. Kidney damage, which shares many of the risk factors for heart disease (such as high blood sugar, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol). How can you lower your heart disease risk? You can lower your heart disease risk by: Keeping your cholesterol numbers at healthy levels. Controlling your blood sugar. Lowering your blood pressure if it's high. Not smoking. This isn't as hard as it might sound. Many of the same healthy habits help control your blood sugar, blood pressure, c Continue reading >>

Is It Worthwhile For Me To Buy A Blood Sugar Meter And Check My Sugar Frequently?

Is It Worthwhile For Me To Buy A Blood Sugar Meter And Check My Sugar Frequently?

A blood glucose meter is not used to diagnose diabetes. If used properly, its purpose is to determine if your medications, activities and diet are helping you maintain control of your blood glucose levels. An A1C test gives an estimate of your average blood glucose over a longer period of time, meaning it gives a more meaningful result, but does not give information on the best short-term control of blood sugar. Atorvastatin (as all statins) have been shown to cause a small increase in the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. However, the benefits of preventing cardiovascular disease far outweigh the risk. Type 2 diabetes is generally preventable, especially at your age. There's no reason to have a BMI of 31, short of having some chronic metabolic issue. And that level of obesity not only increases your risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, but also increases your risk significantly for all cancers. Do not waste the money on a blood glucose meter at this time. If you develop diabetes, your insurance company will cover the cost of the meter and the very expensive strips. But you shouldn't develop the mindset that diabetes is inevitable–you have the opportunity to prevent it. I know it's hard, and I don't want to be preachy, but diabetes really decrease your lifespan and your quality of life. Talk to your physician. They may not give you great advice, but hopefully they can give you choices. Also, there's some evidence that those who have pre-diabetes can reduce their risks by taking some oral medications, like metformin. Again, see your physician for advice on this point. I hope this helps. Continue reading >>

Heart Failure In Diabetes Mellitus

Heart Failure In Diabetes Mellitus

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk of heart failure (HF) independent of coronary heart disease and hypertension and may cause a cardiomyopathy. The term “diabetic cardiomyopathy” was initially introduced based upon postmortem findings in four diabetic adults who had HF in the absence of coronary heart disease [1]. Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been defined as ventricular dysfunction that occurs in diabetic patients independent of a recognized cause (eg, coronary heart disease, hypertension) [2,3]. However, the frequency with which this occurs is not well defined and there is some evidence that diabetic cardiomyopathy is uncommon in patients with type 1 diabetes in the era of intensive insulin therapy [4]. Issues related to HF in diabetic patients will be reviewed here. The prevalence of and risk factors for coronary heart disease among patients with DM and the evaluation and treatment of HF are discussed separately. (See "Prevalence of and risk factors for coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus" and "Evaluation of the patient with suspected heart failure" and "Overview of the therapy of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction" and "Treatment and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction".) EPIDEMIOLOGY There is a well-established association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and heart failure (HF) that is partly but not entirely linked to coronary heart disease and hypertension. Associations have also been reported between absolute blood glucose levels, glycemic control, and HF. Diabetes and HF — The Framingham Study firmly established the epidemiologic link between diabetes and HF [5]. The risk of HF was increased 2.4-fold in men and fivefold in women. Diabetes predicted HF independent of coexisting hypert Continue reading >>

Why Does High Blood Sugar Cause Stroke And Heart Attack?

Why Does High Blood Sugar Cause Stroke And Heart Attack?

Stroke and heart attack are commonly refered to as cardiovascular disease, meaning the common cause is a disease (most often narrowing by atherosclerotic plaques) of the arteries. There definitely is a relationship between high blood sugar and stroke/heart attacks. High blood sugar is either: a symptom of diabetes mellitus, notorious for the diseases caused by large of small artery disease resulting in peripheral nerve disease, kidney failure, blindness, coronary heart disease, stroke and foot or limb amputation, expecially if badly controled thus featuring high blood sugar (CAUSE) or part of the metabolic derangement caused by stroke or heart attack (RESULT). For diabetes causing cardiovascular disease see: For high blood sugar secondary to stroke or heart attack see: Continue reading >>

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