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Diabetes Mellitus And Anemia

Diabetes And Anemia: Are They Related?

Diabetes And Anemia: Are They Related?

Someone’s anemic if they have an abnormally low amount of red blood cells – and when there are too few red blood cells, body organs don’t get the oxygen they need. This not only strains and damages organs, but it also decreases a person’s quality of life by causing fatigue, weakness, and headaches. Red blood cells can transport oxygen because they’re full of a complex molecule called hemoglobin, which can grab, hold, and release oxygen as needed in different part of the body. A doctor may an anemic person as having “too little hemoglobin” or “a low hematocrit”. The first statement refers to the amount of concentration of hemoglobin molecules in your blood, and the second refers to the concentration of red blood cells in your blood. If that sounds redundant, you’re right! They’re both describing the same thing. That’s why it’s best to pay attention to one or the other (not both) to avoid confusion. Types of anemia There are quite a few different types of anemia (over 400 to be exact!). The most common ones are summarized below. It is very important to know the type of anemia and the cause. Without knowing the cause, you cannot treat the disease! Iron Deficiency. This is the most common type. It is caused by lack of absorption, intake, or by blood loss. Aplastic. This occurs when the body stops making new red blood cells. It is rare, but very serious. Hemolytic. This type happens when red blood cells are destroyed faster than they can be produced. Vitamin Deficiency. Poor nutrition, or impaired vitamin absorption causes this type. Pernicious. With this, the B-12 intake is okay, but the body cannot process it correctly. Fragile Red Cell. Some people inherit abnormal red blood cells that die earlier than normal, like in sickle cell or thalassemia. Continue reading >>

Nephro-urology Monthly

Nephro-urology Monthly

Anemia and Microvascular Complications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus 1 Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran 2 Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran 3 Students Center for Medical Research, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran 4 Endocrinology and Metabolism Department, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran * Corresponding author: Zohreh Rostami, Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9121544897, Fax: +98-2181262073, E-mail: [email protected] Nephro-Urology Monthly: July 2014, 6 (4) ; e19976 To Cite: Hosseini M S, Rostami Z, Saadat A, Saadatmand S M, Naeimi E. et al. Anemia and Microvascular Complications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Nephro-Urol Mon. 2014 ;6(4):e19976. doi: 10.5812/numonthly.19976 . Background: Although chronic kidney disease-induced anemia is more prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), anemia is a common finding prior to manifestation of kidney disease. In presence of some risk factors at the time of diagnosing DM, microvascular complications must be considered. The effect of anemia as a risk factor on progression of DM complications is still unclear. Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its association with microvascular complications in patients with type 2 DM. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in the outpatient endocrinology clinic at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Study was done from February 2011 to February 2012. Patients with type 2 DM without any obvio Continue reading >>

Pernicious Anemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Alopecia Areata Universalis

Pernicious Anemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Alopecia Areata Universalis

Volume 23, Issue 6 , NovemberDecember 2009, Pages 434-437 Pernicious anemia in a patient with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and alopecia areata universalis Get rights and content A 27-year-old male, who had developed diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMT1) since the age of eighteen and alopecia areata universalis nine months later, attended the outpatient clinics complaining of general fatigue and shortness of breath. A Schilling test was indicative of pernicious anemia. Antigastric parietal cell (AGPA) and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were positive, confirming diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Thyroid and Addison's disease were excluded. Gastroscopy revealed atrophic gastritis without any evidence of carcinoid tumors. The aim of this case, which, to our knowledge, is the first one to describe a correlation between diabetes mellitus Type 1 (DMT1), pernicious anaemia, and alopecia areata universalis, is to remind the clinician of the increased risk of pernicious anaemia and gastric carcinoids in DMT1 patients. Screening for AGPA followed by serum gastrin and vitamin B12 levels constitute the most evidence-based diagnostic approach. Continue reading >>

Association Of Anemia And Renal Function Test Among Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Fenote Selam Hospital, West Gojam, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross Sectional Study

Association Of Anemia And Renal Function Test Among Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Fenote Selam Hospital, West Gojam, Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross Sectional Study

Association of anemia and renal function test among diabetes mellitus patients attending Fenote Selam Hospital, West Gojam, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross sectional study Abate et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2013 Anemia is a common problem in diabetic patients. Diabetic patients have a greater severity of anemia as the level of Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) decreases compared to non-diabetic patients. Despite these facts, anemia is unrecognized and largely untreated in patients with diabetes in Ethiopia particularly in those patients attending Fenote Selam Hospital. Therefore, this study was aimed to assess the association of anemia and renal function test among diabetes mellitus patients attending Fenote Selam Hospital, North West of Ethiopia. An Institutional -based cross-sectional study was conducted from February 2012 to April 2012 on diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Systematic random sampling technique was used to get the total sample size of 384 patients. A total of seven ml of venous blood was collected from diabetes mellitus patients; two ml was collected by EDTA anticoagualted vacutainer test tube for haemoglobin determination and 5 ml venous blood was collected by plain vacutainer tube for creatinine and Blood urea nitrogen determination. The data were double entered and analyzed using SPSS-16 statistical software. The degree of association between independent and dependent variables was assessed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis in terms of P-value and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Out of the total 384 DM patients included in the study 73 (19%) were anemic. Fifty three (13.8%), forty eight (12.5%), and two hundred eighty three (73.7%) DM patients had an estimated GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m, 60 90 ml/min/ 1.73 m, and > 9 Continue reading >>

Erythropoietic Stress And Anemia In Diabetes Mellitus.

Erythropoietic Stress And Anemia In Diabetes Mellitus.

Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2009 Apr;5(4):204-10. doi: 10.1038/nrendo.2009.17. Erythropoietic stress and anemia in diabetes mellitus. Lister Hospital, Coreys Mill Lane, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UK. [email protected] Anemia is one of the world's most common preventable conditions, yet it is often overlooked, especially in people with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes-related chronic hyperglycemia can lead to a hypoxic environment in the renal interstitium, which results in impaired production of erythropoietin by the peritubular fibroblasts and subsequent anemia. Anemia in patients with diabetes mellitus might contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease and aggravate diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy. Anemia occurs earlier in patients with diabetic renal disease than in nondiabetic individuals with chronic kidney disease. Although erythropoietin has been used to treat renal anemia for nearly two decades, debate persists over the optimal target hemoglobin level. Most guidelines recommend that hemoglobin levels be maintained between 105g/l and 125g/l. The suggested role of anemia correction--to prevent the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with diabetes mellitus--is yet to be established. However, an emphasis on regular screening for anemia, alongside that for other diabetes-related complications, might help to delay the progression of vascular complications in these patients. Continue reading >>

Anaemia In Patients With Diabetes: Unrecognised, Undetected And Untreated?

Anaemia In Patients With Diabetes: Unrecognised, Undetected And Untreated?

Background: Diabetes mellitus is one of the two most common causes of end-stage renal disease and significant proportions of patients with diabetes mellitus develop renal complications. Anaemia is a key indicator of renal disease yet most patients with diabetes are rarely tested for anaemia and are unaware of the link between anaemia and kidney disease. Patients and Methods: A pan-European study was undertaken to assess patients' level of awareness and understanding of anaemia and of the complications of diabetes mellitus, and to determine the impact of anaemia on quality of life. The study comprised a questionnaire-based interview with 1054 respondents from six countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy and the UK). Ages ranged from 18 to 85, the average duration of diabetes was 15 years and 69% of respondents had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: Only 32% of respondents had been given information about anaemia, although 83% had heard of anaemia. Less than half were aware of being tested for anaemia and only 14% attributed anaemia to diabetes. Of 1054 respondents, 132 were known to be anaemic, one-fifth had received no treatment, 12 had received blood transfusions, five were receiving erythropoietin therapy and the remainder had been given iron and/or vitamin supplementation. Perceived state of health was worse in those with anaemia, 47% had either experienced periods of ill health or were feeling in poor health generally compared with only 28% of those without anaemia. Tiredness and lethargy were more marked in those with anaemia, 74% feeling tired and lethargic considerably more often or somewhat more often than others compared with only 52% of those without anaemia. With respect to complications of diabetes, respondents were most concerned about retinopath Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Anemia In Type 2 Diabetic Mellitus And Its Prognostic Index | Periasamy | International Journal Of Medical Research And Review

Incidence Of Anemia In Type 2 Diabetic Mellitus And Its Prognostic Index | Periasamy | International Journal Of Medical Research And Review

International Journal of Medical Research and Review Incidence of anemia in type 2 diabetic mellitus and its prognostic index S. Periasamy, Adhin Antony Xavier, R. Gowtham Objective: To identify the incidence of anemia in type 2 diabetic mellitus in a rural population and its prognostic value. Methodology: This is prospective observational study conducted at RMMCH, Chidambaram; the study comprises of 250 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetic mellitus. Age of greater than 18 years, Risk factor such us hypertension and CAD were included in the study. Age of less than 18 years, anemia due to chronic blood loss, anemia due to other secondary causes and patient on treatment for anemia is excluded from the study. In patients with diabetic mellitus, HbA1c, Complete Blood Picture, Smear study, were done after obtaining consent detail from patients. Result: In the present study out of 250 populations females was dominated by 160/250(64%) with mean age group of 6013 were mean duration of diabetes being 4.13 years and mean hemoglobin level was 11.3 2%, the comorbid condition such us CAD and Hypertension was present in 90 and 110 patients respectively. Mean HbA1c value was 8.42.1. Normocytic Normochromic anemia was present in 25% of anemic patients; Microcytic Hypochromic anemia was found in 35%, Macrocytic Hyperchromic is 32% and Dimorphic anemia was present in 8%. Conclusion: Anemia is present in 74% of the study population which point towards the need of hematological evaluations and care needed for the diabetic patients for better outcome in rural population. P. F. Pereira, R. D. C. G. Alfenas, and R. M. breastfeedingA.Araujo influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus inJornalPediatriachildren, vol. 90, no. 1, pp. 715, 2014. Ramachandran A, Snehalatha C. Current scen Continue reading >>

Anemia In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Anemia In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

1Regional University of Northwestern Rio Grande do Sul (UNIJUÍ), Ijuí, RS, Brazil 2Program in Respiratory Sciences, the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil 3Department of Life Sciences, the Regional University of Northwestern Rio Grande do Sul (UNIJUÍ), Rua do Comércio No. 3000, Bairro Universitário, 98700 000 Ijuí, RS, Brazil 4Program in Integral Attention to Health (PPGAIS-UNIJUI/UNICRUZ), Ijuí, RS, Brazil 5Program in Pharmacology of the Health Sciences Center, The Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), RS, Brazil 6Cenecista Institute for Higher Education, Rua Dr. João Augusto Rodrigues 471, 98801 015 Santo Ângelo, RS, Brazil Academic Editor: Eitan Fibach Copyright © 2015 Jéssica Barbieri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic dis Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anemia:

Diabetes And Anemia:

There are lots of articles about diabetes, as well as all kinds of information about anemia. But what if you have both? About 25 percent of people with diabetes have some level of anemia. This article explains how the two conditions interact. What Is Anemia, and Why Is It Linked to Diabetes? In anemia, there are fewer red blood cells than normal, resulting in less oxygen being carried to the body’s cells. People with anemia often feel tired or weak and may have difficulty getting through activities of daily living. Other symptoms include paleness, poor appetite, dizziness, lightheadedness, rapid heartbeat, and shortness of breath. Because these symptoms can also be associated with diabetes, they are sometimes not recognized as evidence of anemia. Anemia may occur with diabetes because the hormone that regulates red blood cell production, erythropoietin (EPO), is produced by the kidneys. Kidney damage at several levels is a complication of diabetes, and one problem often leads to the other. Changes in the kidneys that occur with diabetes range from diabetic nephropathy all the way to chronic kidney disease. Early detection and treatment is essential to prevent or delay disease progression. Information in greater detail can be found at www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov. Other causes of anemia are low levels of iron or other vitamins, as well as prolonged illness. Diagnosing Anemia A simple blood test done during a doctor visit, called a complete blood count or CBC, is used to check for anemia. The two elements of the test that reveal anemia are hemoglobin and hematocrit. Hemoglobin is the part of red blood cells that carries oxygen to the cells. Hematocrit indicates the percentage of red blood cells in the blood. How Does Anemia Affect Your Diabetes Care? If you have anemia, you Continue reading >>

Anemia

Anemia

When “Tired Blood” is Slowing You Down Most people have heard of anemia and know that it has something to do with the blood. Most people also associate anemia with feeling tired. But probably not too many people could explain exactly what anemia is. Stated simply, anemia is a condition in which there is a lower than normal number of healthy red blood cells in the body and/or a lower than normal amount of hemoglobin in the red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. The specific part of the red blood cell that carries oxygen is called hemoglobin. Red blood cells also carry waste products from the cells to the urinary and respiratory systems to be excreted. When either the number of red blood cells or the amount of hemoglobin is low, the body’s cells receive less oxygen than normal. A low oxygen level can cause fatigue and other symptoms such as weakness, difficulty exercising, and light-headedness. Anemia can develop for many reasons. In fact, there are more than 400 types of anemia. But they can all be categorized into these three general groups: Anemia caused by the loss of blood Anemia caused by a decrease in red blood cell production in the bone marrow or impaired production of red blood cells Anemia caused by red blood cell destruction Anemia is a fairly common condition, but it often goes unrecognized and therefore not treated. Its symptoms are vague and easily mistaken for symptoms of other serious or chronic diseases. But even mild anemia can significantly lower one’s quality of life, and untreated anemia can have serious long-term health effects. Diabetes and anemia Diabetes does not directly cause anemia, but certain complications and conditions associated with diabetes can contribute to it. For example, both Continue reading >>

Anemia In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Anemia In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Jssica Barbieri,1Paula Caitano Fontela,2Eliane Roseli Winkelmann,3,4 Carine Eloise Prestes Zimmermann,5,6 Yana Picinin Sandri,4,6 Emanelle Kerber Viera Mallet,6and Matias Nunes Frizzo3,6 1Regional University of Northwestern Rio Grande do Sul (UNIJU 2Program in Respiratory Sciences, the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil 3Department of Life Sciences, the Regional University of Northwestern Rio Grande do Sul (UNIJU 4Program in Integral Attention to Health (PPGAIS-UNIJUI/UNICRUZ), Iju 5Program in Pharmacology of the Health Sciences Center, e Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), RS, Brazil 6Cenecista Institute for Higher Education, Rua Dr. Jo ao Augusto Rodrigues 471, 98801 015 Santo Correspondence should be addressed to Carine Eloise Prestes Zimmermann; carine [email protected] and Matias Nunes Frizzo; [email protected] Received June ; Revised September ; Accepted September essica Barbieri et al. is is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. e objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. is is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of patients with DM. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM patients studied, patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hyper Continue reading >>

Anemia And Diabetes - Fulltext - American Journal Of Nephrology 2004, Vol. 24, No. 5 - Karger Publishers

Anemia And Diabetes - Fulltext - American Journal Of Nephrology 2004, Vol. 24, No. 5 - Karger Publishers

World Health Organization statistics identify 150 million people with diabetes mellitus worldwide and suggest that this figure may double by 2025. In countries with a western lifestyle, the number of patients admitted for renal replacement therapy with diabetes as a co-morbid condition has increased significantly up to three to four times in a period of 10 years. Diabetes and renal failure are thus tightly linked diseases, and so is anemia. However, whether anemia may be worsened and/or directly, at least in part, caused by diabetes is not clearly elucidated yet. In this article, we review the prevalence, pathophysiology and consequences of anemia in diabetic patients. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) in diabetes mellitus patients has been called a medical catastrophe of worldwide dimension [ 1 ]. World Health Organization statistics identify 150 million people with diabetes mellitus worldwide and suggest that this figure may double by 2025. In countries with a western lifestyle, the number of patients admitted for renal replacement therapy with diabetes as a co-morbid condition has increased significantly up to three to four times in a period of 10 years [ 2 ]. Consequently, diabetes is the single most common cause of end-stage renal disease and therefore the most common cause of renal anemia. In this article, we review the prevalence, pathophysiology and consequences of anemia in diabetic patients. Prevalence of Anemia in Diabetic Patients Patients with diabetes suffer the consequences of impaired renal function earlier in the course of their disease than do their non diabetic counterparts [ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ]. In diabetic nephropathy (DN), anemia tends to be more severe than in non-diabetic renal disease and occurs at an earlier stage of the disease. However, because Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Increases The Prevalence Of Anemia In Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nested Case-control Study

Diabetes Mellitus Increases The Prevalence Of Anemia In Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nested Case-control Study

Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study Charalampos Loutradis, Pantelis A Sarafidis, Department of Nephrology, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54642 Thessaloniki, Greece Alexandra Skodra, Panagiota Tolika, Dimitris Alexandrou, Afroditi Avdelidou, Hemodialysis Unit, General Hospital of Grevena, 52100 Grevena, Greece Panagiotis Georgianos, Section of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54636 Thessaloniki, Greece Author contributions: Loutradis C performed the statistical analysis and wrote the manuscript; Skodra A, Tolika P, Alexandrou D collected study material; Georgianos P participated in the statistical analysis; Avdelidou A prospectively collected data and supervised the study material collection; Sarafidis PA designed the study, supervised the statistical analysis and edited the manuscript. Correspondence to: Pantelis A Sarafidis, MD, MSc, PhD, Department of Nephrology, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Konstantinoupoleos 49, 54642 Thessaloniki, Greece. [email protected] Received 2016 Feb 19; Revised 2016 Apr 1; Accepted 2016 May 10. Copyright The Author(s) 2016. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eG Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Anaemia In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence Of Anaemia In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence of anaemia in patients with Diabetes Mellitus Anaemia is an increasingly recognised entity in patients with diabetes mellitus. We aimed to determine the prevalence of anaemia in our population of patients with diabetes, and to examine the factors associated with anaemia. The haemoglobin (Hb) levels in a consecutive series of patients attending for annual review of their diabetes over a three-month period were measured. Patients were classified as anaemic as per the WHO criteria. During the period of study, 270 patients attended for review. Eleven per cent of males and 16% of females were anaemic. Seventy four per cent of anaemic patients had a serum creatinine <110mol/l and 72% of anaemic patients had a calculated creatinine clearance of >60ml/min. Anaemia was relatively common in patients attending for routine out-patient diabetes clinic review. The high prevalence of anaemia supports the routine screening for anaemia in the diabetes out-patient clinic, including in those without overt nephropathy. Diabetic NephropathyDiabetic RetinopathyProliferative Diabetic RetinopathyUrinary Albumin ExcretionAnaemic Patient These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. Thomas MC, Maclsaac RJ, Tsalamandris C, et al. Anemia in patients with type 1 diabetes.J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89(9): 435963. CrossRef PubMed Google Scholar Thomas MC, Maclsaac RJ, Tsalamandris C, et al. Unrecognized anemia in patients with diabetes: a cross-sectional survey.Diabetes Care 2003;26(4): 11649. CrossRef PubMed Google Scholar Thomas MC, Maclsaac RJ, Tsalamandris C, et al. The burden of anaemia in type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Anemia In Diabetic Patients: Could You Be At Risk?

Anemia In Diabetic Patients: Could You Be At Risk?

This review examined the various factors which increase the risk of diabetics developing anemia. Anemiais a condition in which the tissues in the bodyreceive less oxygenthan needed. This can be due to a reduction in the number of red blood cells (cells which transport oxygen in the blood). However, it may also be occur if a patient is deficient in iron (metal which binds to the red blood cells to carry the oxygen). Anemia is quite frequent in patients with diabetes, although it is not known why. It is important to be able toidentify patients with anemia early in order to prevent complicationswhich occur as a result of being anemic. These complications may includesevere fatigue and an abnormal heart rate. This review aimed to identify the causes of anemia in diabetics, in the hope of identifying certain factors which may indicate that a diabetic has anemia. The cause of anemia in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is often linked to another autoimmune disease (disease in which the bodys immune system attacks its tissues). 510% of T1D patients also suffer fromautoimmune gastritis(inflammation of stomach). These patients are more likely to have anemia.Pernicious anemia(deficiency of vitamin B12 which results in a lack of red blood cell growth) also occurs in 2.64% of diabetics. Other autoimmune diseases such asceliac disease(inflammation of the intestines due to reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat) andhypothyroidism(lack of functioning thyroid) areassociated with anemia in diabetics. 32% of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have anemia. Insulin (hormone that lowers blood glucose levels) is needed for the growth of red blood cells. However, the lack of insulin action in T2D patients may result in anemia. Drugs such asmetformin (Glucophage)are known tocause anem Continue reading >>

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