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Diabetes Medications Without Sulfa

Sulfa Allergy: Drug List, Symptoms, Treatment, And More

Sulfa Allergy: Drug List, Symptoms, Treatment, And More

A sulfa allergy is when you have an allergic reaction to drugs that contain sulfa. About 3 percent of people prescribed sulfa antibiotics will have an adverse reaction to them, according to one review. However, its estimated that of those who have an adverse reaction, only 3 percent are true allergic reactions. That means that number of people who experience an allergic reaction to sulfa is extremely low. Sulfa allergies and sulfite allergies arent the same thing. Sulfites occur naturally, or are used as a preservative agent in some foods and drinks. Sulfa medications and sulfites found in food and drink arent related to each other. The similarity between their names can cause some confusion. Read more about the difference between sulfa allergies and sulfite allergies. Symptoms of sulfa allergy are similar to those of other drug allergies. Symptoms may include: the drug sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis , Crohns disease , and ulcerative colitis the drug dapsone, used to treat dermatitis and some types of pneumonia the drug sumatriptan (Imitrex), used to treat migraines some anti-inflammatory drugs, such as celecoxib (Celebrex) some diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide) and furosemide (Lasix) Having an allergy to sulfa drugs is different from having an allergy to food or drinks that contain sulfites. Unless youve had a reaction to sulfites, consuming food or drink that contains sulfites is OK. Conversely, if youve had an allergic reaction to sulfites, it doesnt mean that youll also be allergic to sulfa drugs. If you have an allergic reaction to sulfa drugs, treatment will be centered on relieving your symptoms. Your doctor may prescribe antihistamines or corticosteroids to relieve hives, rash, and itching. A bronchodi Continue reading >>

I Have A Sulfa Allergy. Do I Need To Avoid Certain Medications?

I Have A Sulfa Allergy. Do I Need To Avoid Certain Medications?

People who have a sulfa allergy can react to some medications that contain sulfa. Sulfonamide antibiotics that can cause a reaction Antibiotics containing chemicals called sulfonamides can trigger a reaction if you have a sulfa allergy. These antibiotics include combination drugs: Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Septra, Bactrim) Erythromycin-sulfisoxazole Other medications that may cause a reaction Other types of sulfa medications may trigger a reaction in some people who have a sulfa allergy: Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), used to treat Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis Dapsone, used to treat leprosy, dermatitis and certain types of pneumonia Keep in mind, if you have a reaction to a sulfonamide antibiotic, you may still be able to take other sulfonamide medications without having a reaction. Sulfonamide medications that may be OK Certain diabetes medications — glyburide (Glynase, Diabeta) and glimepiride (Amaryl), for example Some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as celecoxib (Celebrex) The migraine medication sumatriptan (Imitrex, Sumavel Dosepro) Certain "water pills" (diuretics), such as furosemide (Lasix) and hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide) An allergy to sulfonamide medications is different from having an adverse reaction to wine or food that contains sulfites. Having a reaction to sulfites in something you eat or drink doesn't mean you'll be allergic to sulfonamide medication. If you have HIV/AIDS, you may have an increased sensitivity to sulfonamide medications. Always tell your doctor about your sensitivities to medication. There are no diagnostic tests for sulfa allergy. However, sulfa desensitization might be an option, especially if medication containing sulfamethoxazole is needed. Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Treatment (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Treatment (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas (an organ in the abdomen) produces insufficient amounts of the hormone insulin and/or the body becomes resistant to normal or even high levels of insulin. This causes high blood sugar (glucose) levels, which can lead to a number of complications if untreated. People with type 2 diabetes require regular monitoring and ongoing treatment to maintain normal or near-normal blood sugar levels. Treatment includes lifestyle adjustments, self-care measures, and medicines, which can minimize the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular (heart-related) complications. This topic review will discuss the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Topics that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available: (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)".) (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)".) TYPE 2 DIABETES TREATMENT GOALS Blood sugar control — The goal of treatment in type 2 diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels at normal or near-normal levels. Careful control of blood sugars can help prevent the long-term effects of poorly controlled blood sugar (diabetic complications of the eye, kidney, nervous system, and cardiovascular system). Home blood sugar testing — In people with type 2 diabetes, home blood sugar testing might be recommended, especially in those who take certain oral diabetes medicines or insulin. Home blood sugar testing is not usually necessary for people who are diet controlled. (See "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) A normal fasting blood sugar is less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L), although some people will have a different goal. Continue reading >>

Sulfa Allergies: What You Need To Know

Sulfa Allergies: What You Need To Know

Sulfa drugs can treat a range of health problems from eye infections to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). But if you get a rash or more serious reaction when you take one of these drugs, you may have a sulfa allergy . Sulfa drugs, also called sulfonamides, include antibiotics and other types of drugs. Allergies happen most often with antibiotics. Around 3% of people have some type of reaction to them. Tell your doctor right away if you think youre having a reaction to a sulfa drug. Shell decide whether to take you off the drug and how to treat your symptoms. If youre allergic to sulfa drugs, or any other medication, you may have one or more of these symptoms: The reaction can also cause these serious skin reactions: Sulfonamide drug hypersensitivity syndrome: Rash, fever , and organ problems begin within 1 to 2 weeks after you start the drug. Drug eruption: Red or swollen, rounded patches form in 30 minutes to 8 hours. Stevens Johnson syndrome : This potentially life-threatening reaction causes skin to blister and peel off. Other reactions to sulfa drugs include headache , trouble sleeping , cloudy urine (crystalluria), and low blood counts. Rarely, a severe allergic reaction called anaphylaxis happens. Sulfa antibiotics have been widely used for more than 70 years. In fact, the first antibiotic was a sulfa drug introduced in 1936. Today, these drugs include burn creams, vaginal suppositories , and eye drops as well as medications for many types of infections. If youve had an allergic reaction to one sulfa antibiotic, youre probably allergic to all of them. Here are a few examples of common sulfa drugs that could cause problems: Sulfamethoxazole / trimethoprim ( Bactrim , Sulfatrim ): a sulfa combination drug that can be taken in liquid or pill form for many types of infectio Continue reading >>

What Can You Expect When Taking Sulfonylureas Drugs?

What Can You Expect When Taking Sulfonylureas Drugs?

What are Sulfonylureas Drugs? Sulfonylureas (Sulfonamide , Sulfa or Sulpha) are a class of medications for people with type 2 diabetes. Along with a healthy diet and exercise plan, sulfonylureas can lower blood sugar by increasing the amount of insulin produced by your pancreas. Suitable for children and young adults who are overweight or who have type 2 diabetes, sulfa are often prescribed in combination with other diabetes medications, particularly metformin. Before taking a sulfonylurea, there are a few things you should know… These medications are not suitable for treating type 1 diabetes, and should not be used if you have diabetic ketoacidosis. They may not be right for you if you have previously had problems with your liver or kidneys. The side effects of Sulfonamides may worsen if you consume alcohol while taking this medication. If possible, you should avoid or limit drinking alcohol while taking such medicines. Sulfonylurea can cause your skin to become more sensitive to sunlight. You will need to take extra care to protect yourself against sun exposure to avoid a sunburn (especially when taking Tolbutamide or Tolazamide) or a skin rash (when taking Chlorpropamide). It is not known whether sulfonylureas pass through breast milk or whether the medication can affect your unborn baby. So if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you should tell your doctor before taking a sulpha. If you take any other products, such as prescriptions, vitamins or other over-the-counter supplements, you should tell your doctor to make sure they are safe to take with a sulfonylureas. You may wish to wear a diabetes ID tag, in case of emergency. You should also inform any health care provider that you are taking a sulfonamide before having any type of medical or dental procedure. Sulfa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Finding The Best Fit

Diabetes Drugs: Finding The Best Fit

During the early stage of type 2 diabetes, making lifestyle changes can sometimes reverse the disease. But if diet and exercise aren’t enough to prevent symptoms and complications of type 2 diabetes, you’ll likely have to incorporate medications to your everyday routine. Finding the right diabetes drugs, however, isn't an exact science. "There is considerable variety in physician-prescribing practice for diabetes,” said Amber L. Taylor, MD, director of the diabetes division at the Mercy Medical Center for Endocrinology in Baltimore. “We are trying to match the best drug with the patient based on side effects and risks.” Metformin: The First Medication to Take With type 2 diabetes, your body either doesn’t respond well to insulin — a hormone that helps blood sugar move into cells — or doesn’t produce enough of it to maintain a normal glucose level. Your doctor will do a blood test called A1C, which surveys your average blood sugar levels over two to three months. These results show how well your treatment is working and ultimately tell your doctor what medications to opt for. Diabetes experts agree that metformin is the best first step for most diabetic patients, according to Taylor. “It is well tolerated, cheap, and cost-effective,” she said. Taken orally, metformin improves your body’s response to insulin and helps control high blood sugar. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology also found that the drug may lower women’s risk of getting breast cancer. If you have kidney, liver, and heart conditions, this medication may not be the right fit for you, however. When taking metformin, it is important to limit alcohol consumption, and taking it with food helps avoid side effects like bloating, nausea, and diarrhea. Adding Other Diabet Continue reading >>

Ability To Take Metformin In A Patient With Stevens-johnson Syndrome Associated With The Administration Of Bactrim

Ability To Take Metformin In A Patient With Stevens-johnson Syndrome Associated With The Administration Of Bactrim

Ability to take metformin in a patient with Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with the administration of Bactrim We have a patient who had Stevens-Johnson Syndrome from Bactrim. Can this patient safely take Metformin? Was recommended from his Internist to stop Metformin and see an allergist for further recommendations. Only information we could find was from the Drug Guide under Precautions and Warnings with Metformin that states "if you are allergic to sulfa medications, you may also be allergic to metformin-though most people with sulfa allergies can take Metformin without problems." We have had many questions submitted to our website regarding the potential cross-reactivity between sulfonamide antibiotics and other drugs which may contain sulfa. For the most part, there is no documented cross-reactivity between these drugs, and although there are warnings against taking metformin if you have reacted to a sulfonamide, I could not find any cases of such cross-reactivity. I believe that the answer to your question is identical to that in our previous response to a similar question below. "Cross-reactivity between sulfonylureas and drugs containing the sulfa moiety What recommendation would you make to a patient who has had agranulocytosis attributed to sulfasalazine, with regard to future use of other sulfa-containing drugs such as thiazide diuretics, Celecoxib, or sulfonamide antibiotics? My attempt to search the literature did not yield an answer... I could not glean whether these agranulocytosis reactions are usually specific to the individual drug or whether there may be cross-reactivity among chemically-related compounds in this context. I would appreciate any insight you may have. Thank you. I am afraid the reason that you have not been able to find any definit Continue reading >>

Sulfa Allergy: Which Medications Should I Avoid?

Sulfa Allergy: Which Medications Should I Avoid?

Sulfa allergy: Which medications should I avoid? People who have a sulfa allergy can react to some medications that contain sulfa. Sulfonamide antibiotics that can cause a reaction Antibiotics containing chemicals called sulfonamides can trigger a reaction if you have a sulfa allergy. These antibiotics include combination drugs: Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Septra, Bactrim) Other medications that may cause a reaction Other types of sulfa medications may trigger a reaction in some people who have a sulfa allergy: Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), used to treat Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis Dapsone, used to treat leprosy, dermatitis and certain types of pneumonia Keep in mind, if you have a reaction to a sulfonamide antibiotic, you may still be able to take other sulfonamide medications without having a reaction. Certain diabetes medications glyburide (Glynase, Diabeta) and glimepiride (Amaryl), for example Some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as celecoxib (Celebrex) The migraine medication sumatriptan (Imitrex, Sumavel Dosepro) Certain "water pills" (diuretics), such as furosemide (Lasix) and hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide) An allergy to sulfonamide medications is different from having an adverse reaction to wine or food that contains sulfites. Having a reaction to sulfites in something you eat or drink doesn't mean you'll be allergic to sulfonamide medication. If you have HIV/AIDS, you may have an increased sensitivity to sulfonamide medications. Always tell your doctor about your sensitivities to medication. There are no diagnostic tests for sulfa allergy. However, sulfa desensitization might be an option, especially if medication containing sulfamethoxazole is needed. 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research ( Continue reading >>

Buy Oral & Injectable Prescription Medications For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Buy Oral & Injectable Prescription Medications For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Browse Our Prescription Type 2 Diabetes Medications Below * CanadianInsulin.com provides flat rate shipping to anywhere in the United States. Diabetic Drugs Actos Tablets Amaryl (Glimepiride) Tablets Avandia (Rosiglitazone) Tablets Avandamet Tablets Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Tablets Diabeta (Glyburide) Tablets Farxiga (Forxiga) Tablets Glyburide Tablets Invokana (Canagliflozin) Tablets Januvia (Sitagliptin) Tablets Janumet Tablets Janumet XR Tablets Jardiance (Empagliflozin) Tablets Jentadueto Tablets Komboglyze Tablets Metformin Tablets Onglyza (Saxagliptin) Tablets Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tablets Repaglinide Tablets Pioglitazone Tablets Saxenda Pens Tradjenta (Trajenta) Tablets Trulicity (Dulaglutide) Pens Victoza Pens What is Type 2 Diabetes (T2D)? T2D, also known as diabetes mellitus type 2 or adult-onset diabetes, is a long-term (chronic) metabolic disorder. Metabolism is a measure of all the reactions in your body needed for you to carry on healthy living. Metabolism is most commonly associated with the breakdown of food for energy, and the use of that energy to grow, repair and maintain the human body. With T2D, your body has a specific problem with how it breaks down food and how it uses it for energy and storage. One of the most important compounds that regulates energy utilization and storage in the body is insulin. It is a hormone made in the pancreas that controls the body’s main energy source, glucose or more simply, sugar. Type II diabetes is a disorder that results from the lack of insulin in your blood or when your body has a problem using the insulin it produces, which is called insulin resistance. As a result, sugar levels build up in your blood instead of getting used for energy. Some characteristic signs of type-2 diabetes is having high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Drug List For Sulfa Allergy

Drug List For Sulfa Allergy

Dr. Shavon Jackson-Michel is an expert in the field of health and wellness and has been writing for LIVESTRONG.COM since 2009. She is a university-level professor and a licensed naturopathic physician providing individualized consultations on natural and holistic approaches to chronic disease at her Bloomfield, NJ office. Dr. Jackson-Michel is a doctoral graduate of the University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine. Fever is a major symptom of a sulfa allergy. Sulfa allergy is the allergic response that occurs from the presence of the compound structure SO2NH2. This compound can be found in the molecular makeup of many different drugs. The term "sulfa" was initially a description of a specific category of drugs, namely the sulfonamide group of anti-infective medications often used in the treatment of bacterial infections. However, there are other drugs whose chemical makeup contains molecules similar to SO2NH2 and are thus suspected of being able to cross-react in the body and elicit an allergic response. Sulfonamide antimicrobials are drugs used in the treatment of bacterial infections. They are one of the older classes of anti-infective medications and can be used orally for internal infections like prostatitis, bladder and urinary tract infections, bronchitis, intestinal infections and inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. It also has topical use for vaginal infections, superficial eye infections and burns. Sulfonamide drugs are often categorized by their common prefix, sulfa-. Common generic sulfonamides include sulfacetamide, sulfadiazine and sulfasalazine, according to Merck Manuals Online Library. The hypersensitivity reaction to this medication usually develops within weeks of starting the drug. A Christch Continue reading >>

Oral Medicines For Diabetes

Oral Medicines For Diabetes

What medicines could my doctor prescribe? Six kinds of diabetes medicine are available in pill form: metformin (a biguanide), sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. Each medicine has good points and bad points. Your doctor will decide which medicine is right for you. Metformin is a type of biguanide and it is currently the only biguanide available in the United States. It is often the first oral medicine prescribed for someone newly diagnosed with diabetes. It has the advantage of not causing low blood sugar. Metformin does not cause your pancreas to make insulin, but it helps your body use insulin better. Metformin can cause side effects such as nausea or diarrhea in some people. Your doctor may prescribe metformin in combination with another oral diabetes medicine. Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are the most commonly prescribed diabetes medicines. These medicines help your pancreas make insulin. They are inexpensive and have few side effects. There are 3 types of sulfonyureas: glipizide, glimepiride and glyburide. Side effects may include weight gain and low level of sodium in the blood. Sulfonylureas can be taken alone or with metformin, pioglitazone (a thiazolidinedione) or insulin. If you’re allergic to sulfa, you can’t take a sulfonylurea. This class of medicines includes rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These medicines help your body respond better to insulin. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone can be used alone or in combination with other diabetes medicines. Side effects may include weight gain, fluid retention and an increase in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. People taking rosiglitazone and pioglitazone also need periodic liver tests. Continue reading >>

Sulfa Allergies Vs. Sulfite Allergies

Sulfa Allergies Vs. Sulfite Allergies

Medically reviewed by Alan Carter, PharmD on November 28, 2017 Written by Michael Kerr and Tricia Kinman Allergies to sulfonamides, also known as sulfa drugs, are common. Sulfa drugs were the first successful treatment against bacterial infections in the 1930s. Theyre still used today in antibiotics and other medications, like diuretics and anticonvulsants. People with HIV/AIDS are at particular risk for sulfa sensitivity. Because their names are similar, people often confuse sulfa with sulfites. Sulfites occur naturally in most wines. Theyre also used as a preservative in other foods. Sulfites and sulfa medications are chemically unrelated, but they can both cause allergic reactions in people. Symptoms of an allergic reaction to sulfa include: swelling of the face, mouth, tongue, and throat anaphylaxis (a severe, life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention) Rarely, cases of serum sickness-like reactions can occur around 10 days after a sulfa drug treatment begins. Symptoms include: You should contact a doctor immediately if you have these symptoms. Avoid the following medications if youre allergic or have a sensitivity to sulfa: antibiotic combination drugs such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Septra, Bactrim) and erythromycin-sulfisoxazole dapsone (used to treat leprosy , dermatitis , and certain types of pneumonia ) Safe medications for people with sulfa allergies Not all drugs that contain sulfonamides cause reactions in all people. Many people with sulfa allergies and sensitivities may be able to safely take the following medications: some diabetes medications including glyburide (Glynase, Diabeta) and glimepiride (Amaryl) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as celecoxib (Celebrex) migraine medication sumatriptan (Imitrex, Continue reading >>

Alternate For Sulfa Drugs (glyburide,glipizide,glimeprid... For Type-2 Diabetes As It Causes Allergic Sneezing?

Alternate For Sulfa Drugs (glyburide,glipizide,glimeprid... For Type-2 Diabetes As It Causes Allergic Sneezing?

Best Answer: The maximum dosage of metformin hydrochloride is 850 mg 3 times daily. Other oral medications include pioglitazone (Actos) up to 45 mg daily and either saxagliptin (Onglyza) up to 5 mg daily or sitagliptin phosphate (Januvia) up to 100 mg daily. The only problem with the latter 2 drugs categories is their expense. There are other oral medications but I would not recommend them. I also do not recommend the sulfonamide drugs in the 1st place. They do increase insulin production but they lead to premature beta (insulin producing) cell pancreatic failure and reliance upon insulin itself. JR For the best answers, search on this site Diet and exercise can do a lot. Although it sounds like you might not be able to exercise easily. If you can, though, try to find something that you can do (like swimming). If not, diet can help a lot, although often you need meds in addition to the diet. Weight loss (even a few pounds) can also help. As for meds, with time, the GI upset often goes away with metformin. I agree that it's a good idea to try the extended release. If that doesn't work, you can try sulfonylureas (several drugs) which signal the pancreas to release more insulin and thialinodinediones (other drugs such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone). There are some others that inhibit the enzyme responsible for breaking down disaccharides in the gut so that less glucose is absorbed. However, I wouldn't take that if you're on a medication that can cause low blood sugar (such as sulfonylureas). Upload failed. Please upload a file larger than 100x100 pixels We are experiencing some problems, please try again. You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You can only upload files of type 3GP, 3GPP, MP4, MOV, AVI, MPG, MPEG, or RM. You can only upload photos smaller Continue reading >>

Sulfa Allergies: Overview And What To Avoid

Sulfa Allergies: Overview And What To Avoid

Treatment for a sulfa allergy depends on what symptoms a person experiences. For hives, a rash, or itching, a doctor may prescribe antihistamines or corticosteroids. If a person experiences any respiratory symptoms, such as wheezing, they may require a drug called a bronchodilator that helps to widen the air passages to and from the lungs. It is vital to treat the symptoms of anaphylaxis or Stevens-Johnson syndrome as medical emergencies when they occur. An anaphylactic reaction usually requires administration of epinephrine. People with Stevens-Johnson syndrome are usually admitted to an intensive care unit for treatment that includes: corticosteroids to help control inflammation antibiotics to help prevent or control skin infections intravenous (IV) immunoglobulins to stop the disease progressing further An individual should discontinue the use of the drug immediately and urgently seek advice from their doctor if they have an allergic reaction to sulfa medications. Doctors, dentists, and pharmacist should be made aware of an individual's drug allergies to ensure they prescribe the correct medications. Carrying a medical alert card or medical alert bracelet that details any allergies will ensure appropriate treatment should a person have a reaction that renders them unable to communicate this themselves. While many medications contain sulfa, allergic reactions to sulfa drugs are rare. People with a sulfa allergy who come into contact with drugs containing the compound may experience a rash or hives, have itchy skin or eyes, and develop some swelling. Some people can also experience more severe reactions, such as anaphylaxis and Steven-Johnson syndrome, which are medical emergencies. An individual must ensure all healthcare providers are aware of their allergies to ens Continue reading >>

New Type 2 Diabetes Drug Approved

New Type 2 Diabetes Drug Approved

On January 8, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the oral Type 2 diabetes medicine Farxiga (generic name dapagliflozin), a joint development of Bristol-Myers Squibb and AstraZeneca. Farxiga will join Invokana (canagliflozin) as a member of the class of drugs known as sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. In the process of filtering the blood, the kidneys typically reabsorb all the filtered glucose and return it to the bloodstream. One of the main proteins responsible for this reabsorption is SGLT2. By inhibiting the action of SGLT2, Farxiga blocks the reabsorption of glucose by the kidneys, promoting a loss of glucose in the urine and lowering blood glucose levels. The medicine, which is already available in Europe under the brand name Forxiga , was initially denied approval in 2012 over a lack of information about its risks and benefits. In mid-December of 2013, an FDA advisory panel voted 13 to 1 in favor of approving the medicine, and 10 to 4 that it had an acceptable cardiovascular risk level. Farxiga tablets are approved for use in conjunction with diet and exercise in adults with Type 2 diabetes alone or in combination with metformin, Actos (pioglitazone), Amaryl (glimepiride), Januvia (sitagliptin), and insulin. The medicine comes in tablet strengths of 5 milligrams and 10 milligrams. The recommended starting dose is 5 milligrams once daily, taken in the morning with or without food. In certain people requiring increased blood glucose control, the dose can be increased to up to 10 milligrams daily. The safety and effectiveness of Farxiga were established through 16 clinical trials, involving more than 9,400 people with Type 2 diabetes, that showed improvements in A1C levels (a measure of blood glucose control over the previous 23 mon Continue reading >>

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