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Diabetes Medication Loss Of Appetite

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Tell me about the diabetes drugs Byetta, Victoza and Bydureon. Can they really help people who have diabetes lose weight? Are there side effects? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon) and liraglutide (Victoza) are taken by injection, similar to insulin, but they're not insulin. These medications are in a class of drugs called incretin mimetics, which improve blood sugar control by mimicking the action of a hormone called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Among other things, these drugs stimulate insulin secretion in response to rising blood sugar levels after a meal, which results in lowering of the blood sugar. Byetta, Bydureon and Victoza not only improve blood sugar control, but may also lead to weight loss. There are many proposed ways in which these medications cause weight loss. They appear to help suppress appetite. But the most prominent effect of these drugs is that they delay the movement of food from the stomach into the small intestine. As a result, you may feel "full" faster and longer, so you eat less. Byetta is injected twice daily, and Victoza is injected once a day. Bydureon, a newer formulation, is injected once a week. These drugs do have different effects and side effects to consider. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon). The most common side effect of exenatide is mild to moderate nausea, which improves with time in most people. Several cases of kidney problems, including kidney failure, have been reported in people who have taken exenatide. Rarely, exenatide may cause harmful inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Liraglutide (Victoza). Some studies have found that liraglutide reduces systolic blood pressure and triglycerides, in addition to improving blood sugar control. The most common side effects are headache, nausea and Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Loss Of Appetite

Diabetes: Loss Of Appetite

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that interferes with the body’s ability to control the level of glucose in the blood. No matter what type of diabetes you have, symptoms develop as a result of high blood glucose levels, according to MayoClinic.com. Complications can cause a loss of appetite that lasts for more than a couple of days. Video of the Day When trying to determine the cause for your loss of appetite, your health care provider may ask whether you feel nauseous, have stomach pain or vomiting or are currently taking any medications. Your doctor may also ask if your loss of appetite came on gradually or suddenly and if you've recently lost weight. Mention how long it has been since you first noticed changes in your appetite. Tell your doctor if there is a family history of diabetes. Until your appetite returns to normal, you are at risk for malnutrition and other health problems; therefore, you need to find out the underlying cause for your decrease in appetite. Complications can occur when diabetes goes undiagnosed for an extended length of time. Suffering a loss of appetite for a few weeks or more can lead to malnutrition, a condition where your body does not get the nutrients it needs. Aside from possible malnutrition, if left untreated, diabetes can damage the eyes, kidneys and nerves. Undiagnosed diabetes can also cause circulation problems, heart attack and stroke. Although there is no cure for the disease, you can prevent complications from occurring by maintaining a healthy weight and controlling blood glucose levels. Monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol levels, eating a balanced diet, being physically active and seeing your doctor regularly are additional steps you can take to help manage your diabetes. If hyperglycemia goes untreated, diabet Continue reading >>

Loss Of Appetite Since Diagnosis

Loss Of Appetite Since Diagnosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Has anyone experienced totally losing their appetite since diagnosis? Initially was at the doctors for gastroenteritis then a UTI then the diabetes diagnosis was thrown in the mix. Started controlling my levels immediately by changing my diet but I have to force myself to eat. I was always ravenous before diagnosis. I have lost about a stone and a half in seven weeks. I have no interest in food and eat because I have to. My usual day is porridge for breakfast, fish salad for lunch and meat and veg for tea with few snacks. I don't know if its depression or gastroparesis (I feel nauseous when I wake up). This and all my other aches and pains are getting me down. Not on media yet. Only had a couple of diabetes related appointments so far. I'm interested in your replies. I have an increasing loss of appetite and morning nausea since diagnosis. Initially I thought it was metformin, but I swapped around the timing of my meds and still get the morning nasuea. I was diagnosed 5 weeks ago t2 and on metformin. I had no appetite at all until the past couple of days and have lost about a stone and a half. People tell me thats the metformin as it had that effect. I feel very good on it though although i do think it left me feeling a little sick when i increased dosage bug thats settled now. I have to be careful with drinking coz i font seem to get thirsty eithet Just browsing on here and noticed your posting i was diagnosed with T 2 at the end of July, was reluctant to take any more medication as I have high Blood Pressure and and cholesterol, however eased myself into the metformin and now take 2 twice a day morning with breakfast and around 18.00 with evening me Continue reading >>

Anti-diabetes And Anti-obesity Medications: Effects On Weight In People With Diabetes

Anti-diabetes And Anti-obesity Medications: Effects On Weight In People With Diabetes

Choosing medications for people with diabetes involves consideration of a number of factors, including effects on weight. Improvements in glucose control are often linked to weight gain, but this does not have to be the inevitable result of diabetes treatment. Adding a drug that either promotes weight-loss or is weight neutral to one that promotes weight gain and providing medical nutrition therapy can be considered. The current approach to the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is to achieve the best possible glucose control. Past clinical trials have shown that glycemia plays a key role in the prevention of both macro- and microvascular complications.1–5 The current American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines suggest a glycemic goal of having a hemoglobin A1c (A1C) < 7%, but also state that an A1C of ≤ 6% should be a goal if it can be achieved without risk of complications.6,7 During the past 20 years, a number of new medications to control blood glucose have been introduced, and new approaches to the use of older medications have been developed. In prescribing any medication, however, one must consider benefits versus risks. In terms of the treatment of hyperglycemia, certainly toxic side effects are of concern, as is hypoglycemia. One major area of concern, however, is the effect of such drugs on weight. Weight and diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, are closely related. Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, and the current increase in obesity in our society has fueled a major increase in the expression of this disease.8 Not only does weight, through the mechanism of insulin resistance, aggravate hyperglycemia, it also increases the risk for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and other conditions that lead to cardiovasc Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And Diabetes Drug

Weight Loss And Diabetes Drug

Can a Diabetes Drug Help Obese People Lose Weight? Written by Ginger Vieira on March 28, 2018 Researchers say the drug Ozempic, initially approved to treat type 2 diabetes, can regulate insulin and suppress appetite. A pharmaceutical drug initially used to treat people with type 2 diabetes is now showing promise in helping obese people without diabetes lose weight. Novo Nordisks semaglutide compound, under the brand name Ozempic, is designed to act in the body similarly to the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Traditionally taken once a week via injection, this GLP-1 hormone receptor agonist works in the body by regulating insulin secretion and suppressing appetite. The research was presented at the Endocrine Societys 100th annual meeting. It has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal. This randomized study of weight loss induced with semaglutide in people with obesity but without diabetes has shown the highest weight reductions yet seen for any pharmaceutical intervention, explained Patrick M. ONeil, PhD, director of the Weight Management Center and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina. For many people with type 2 diabetes, their bodies actually struggle to produce enough of this crucial hormone, making it difficult to manage blood sugar levels, control appetite, and most importantly, lose weight. There were 957 participants in the study. None of them had diabetes. All of them had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher. Some received varying doses of daily injections of semaglutide. Others received a placebo or liraglutide (another GLP-1 receptor agonist). All of the patients received monthly guidance on diet and exercise. After one year, explained the report, all participants receiving semagluti Continue reading >>

Meds That Cause Extreme Weight Loss

Meds That Cause Extreme Weight Loss

There are medicines for serious medical conditions such as cancer, HIV and dementia, which suppress the appetite and can cause extreme weight loss and anorexia, writes DietDoc. For the past two weeks we have been considering those food-medication interactions which may cause weight gain, but there are also many medicines which suppress the appetite and cause anorexia and weight loss. I thought long and hard about including this aspect of food-drug interactions, because I did not want to impart information that can be misused in any way. Please do not misinterpret the information in this article. It is intended for those patients who are being treated with the listed medications, who suffer from a suppressed appetite and weight loss . It is not meant for those members of the public who want or need to lose weight no matter how desperate you are. The list does include one or two medications that are used specifically for weight loss purposes, but you should under no circumstances try to obtain any of the other so-called anorexic medicines for slimming purposes. Many of these medications, such as the anticancer drugs, can cause severe side-effects and need to be taken under the supervision of a physician. Such medications are only intended to treat serious physical conditions, such as cancer or HIV or dementia , and should never be used for unintended purposes. Appetite suppressing medications can be divided into a number of categories such as anti-infective drugs, antineoplastics, bronchodilators, cardiovascular drugs, stimulants and other medicines. Antineoplastic or anticancer drugs, also used to treat HIV and conditions such as psoriasis: Aldesleukin and interleukin-2, Capecitabine, Carboplatin, Cytarabine, Dacarbazine, Fluorouracil, Hydroxyurea, Imatinib, Irinotecan, Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Check with your provider; usually taken once a day. Combines the actions of each pill used in the combination. Side effects are the same as those of each pill used in the combination. Some combinationpills may lead to low blood glucose levels if one of the medications contained in the combination has this effect. May decrease the number of pills you need to take. Other drugs are on the horizon as well, as scientists work to improve the variety of medications to treat type 2 diabetes. Frequently physicians will prescribe one type of oral medication and discover it isn't really helping to control blood glucose that much. In the past, this would have meant that the patient would likely be put on insulin. Now, physicians can try another type of medication to see if it helps correct problems. Physicians often notice that a particular medication works well for a period of time and then begins to work less well for a patient. Now they can mix and match medications that work on different aspects of the diabetes problem to see if that will improve blood glucose control. Continue reading >>

Metformin Decreases Food Consumption And Induces Weight Loss In Subjects With Obesity With Type Ii Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes.

Metformin Decreases Food Consumption And Induces Weight Loss In Subjects With Obesity With Type Ii Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes.

Abstract Metformin often promotes weight loss in patients with obesity with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The mechanism may be attributed to decreased food intake. This study has tested the effect of metformin on satiety and its efficacy in inducing weight loss. Twelve diet-treated NIDDM women with obesity were randomly given two dose levels (850 mg or 1700 mg) of metformin or placebo at 0800 for three consecutive days followed by a meal test on the third day on three occasions using a 3x3 Latin square design. The number of sandwich canapes eaten in three consecutive 10-minute periods beginning at 1400 hours was used to quantitate food intake, and the level of subjective hunger was rated just before the sandwich meal with a linear analogue hunger rating scale at 1400 after a 6-hour fast. The prior administration of metformin produced a reduction in calorie intake after each of the two doses of metformin treatment. The 1700-mg metformin dose had the most marked appetite suppressant action. Similarly, hunger ratings were significantly lowered after metformin, and the effect was most pronounced after the administration of 1700 mg of metformin. To assess the efficacy of metformin in reducing bodyweight, 48 diet-treated NIDDM women with obesity who had failed to lose weight by diet therapy were first placed on a 1200-kcal ADA (American Diabetes Association) diet before being randomized to receive either metformin (850 mg) or placebo twice daily in a double-blind fashion for 24 weeks. A 4-week single-blind placebo lead-in period preceded and a 6-week single-blind placebo period followed the 24-week double-blind treatment period. Subjects treated with metformin continued to lose weight throughout 24 weeks of treatment; their mean maximum weight loss was 8 kg Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels like you’re still dehydrated. Your tissues (such as your muscles) are, in fact, dehydrated when there’s too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Your body pulls fluid from the tissues to try to dilute the blood and counteract the high glucose, so your tissues will be dehydrated and send the message that you need to drink more. This is also associated with increased urination. Frequent urination: This is related to drinking so much more in an attempt to satisfy your thirst. Since you’re drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more. Additionally, the body will try to get rid of the excess g Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Medications Affect Your Appetite

How Diabetes Medications Affect Your Appetite

Many of my patients with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. For them, losing weight is an important way to gain better control over their diabetes and improve their health in general. But losing weight by diet and exercise alone can be very difficult. In fact, the latest science about obesity suggests the hormones controlling appetite in an obese body are dysregulated. To put it very simply, that means obese patients’ brains may tell them they’re hungry when they’re actually full. It shows us we may need pharmacological assistance to rebalance leptin, ghrelin, and other appetite hormones to get the body functioning correctly. On top of tracking your diet and blood sugar, regular exercise is a key part of managing your diabetes. And while any exercise is better than none, certain activities have specific benefits for people with diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. While researchers are still learning more about appetite hormones, many of my patients wonder about the effect of their diabetes medications on their appetite. While the more standard diabetes treatments don’t suppress appetite or cause weight loss, newer therapies have come to the market in recent years that do offer these benefits. However, they’re so new that they lack long-term data on safety. Until we get more information, I tend to stick with the standards for most of my patients. Still, there are niches these drugs can fill. The classic treatment prescribed for diabetes, insulin, has the potential to cause weight gain, and doesn’t suppress appetite–which can be a huge drawback to ins Continue reading >>

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Appetite

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Appetite

Why Has My Appetite Changed? One of the odd things about diabetes is that it can cause people to lose their appetite, or conversely, can cause them to feel hungrier than usual. Both extremes are usually a warning sign of some possible issue to your health so it’s important (even if you have not been diagnosed with diabetes) to know about how your appetite can signify a potentially more serious health problem. Loss of Appetite Many people would be delighted to lose their appetite if that made it easier to lose some weight, but when appetite loss is linked to diabetes it can be dangerous. Gastrparesis One possible cause of loss of appetite is gastroparesis, a condition where food moves too slowly through the digestive tract. This happens when over time high blood glucose levels damage the vagus nerve — the nerve that supplies nerve fibers to the pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), trachea (windpipe), lungs, heart, esophagus, and intestinal tract. When this occurs, the muscles in the gut can no longer move food easily out of the stomach into the small intestine to continue the digestion process. This state is called gastroparesis. As well as loss of appetite, symptoms of gastroparesis include weight loss, heartburn, abdominal bloating, reflux, nausea and vomiting undigested food. Additional symptoms might present as high or low blood glucose levels and stomach spasms. The condition makes blood glucose levels more difficult to control. Ketoacidosis Another diabetes-related condition that can cause appetite loss is diabetic ketoacidosis — a complication that occurs when hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) goes untreated and high levels of ketones build up in the blood and urine. When your body does not produce enough insulin, the cells are unable to use glucose for fue Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications May Double As Weight Loss Drugs

Diabetes Medications May Double As Weight Loss Drugs

may also aid weight loss in overweight people with or without diabetes, a new study shows. The drugs Byetta and Victoza mimic gut hormones that decrease appetite. They are typically prescribed when patients need medication to help control their blood sugar. A new research review, published in BMJ, reanalyzed data from 25 separate studies. The review reveals that the drugs helped overweight people without diabetes shed an average of 7 pounds and those with diabetes lose an average of 6 pounds when injected daily or weekly for at least five months. That makes these agents promising treatments for obesity, study authors say. “It’s not a cure, but it’s a good treatment. And you still need to combine it with lifestyle changes,” says researcher Tina Vilsboll, MD, DMSc, an endocrinologist and associate professor at Gentofte Hospital in Hellerup, Denmark. Vilsboll says the modest weight loss many of her diabetic patients see on the drugs helps encourage them to kick up their diet and exercise programs to lose even more weight. “They use it as a tool for changing their lifestyle,” she says. The medications also appear to lower blood pressure and cholesterol slightly, which may help heart disease risks. But the drugs, known as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, also come with side effects. They work, in part, by slowing the movement of food through the stomach. That can sometimes cause a good deal of nausea or even vomiting, especially after a large meal. But Vilsboll says that side effect generally fades over time and doesn’t usually cause people to stop taking the medication. Experts who were not involved in the review say they are cautiously optimistic about the drugs’ prospects for weight loss. “We do have an obesity epidemic. Weight loss by Continue reading >>

Why People With Diabetes Lose Appetite?

Why People With Diabetes Lose Appetite?

Pancreas is an organ of the body. Insulin is a hormone secreted by your pancreas to stimulate the glucose in the blood to get absorbed by the body’s cells. But diabetes makes the body immune to insulin. Thus, the body’s cells are no longer capable of using the glucose to produce energy. While the glucose remains in the blood- increasing blood sugar levels- the body begins to break down body fat to release energy. This process releases ketones, which are chemicals released when fat is broken down to produce energy. The ketones collect in the blood and this makes the blood more acidic. As a result, you may experience the following symptoms: Thirst or a very dry mouth Frequent urination Fatigue Dry or flushed skin Nausea or vomiting Abdominal pain Breathing difficulties Inability to concentrate Therefore, it is clear that ketone poisoning can make you very sick. When you are sick you often don’t feel like eating anything. This is considered a serious condition as it is a sign that your diabetes is out of control and you should contact your doctor. To keep things in check always monitor your blood sugar levels. Get your blood and urine checked for ketone levels. Low appetite can mean that you’re running the risk of weight-loss. Thus, it’s important to increase your calorie intake. You can help your appetite by: Taking a detox program Eating a little more than you normally do Watching what and how much you drink Doing short periods of structured exercises You can also talk to your doctor about it. Your doctor might be able to recommend something to help increase your appetite. Always talk to a nutritionist before making any changes in your eating habits. Source: Continue reading >>

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