diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Medication Adherence Statistics

Endocrine Connections | Mobile

Endocrine Connections | Mobile

Individual patient attitudes and intentions can influence adherence to the use of medical therapies. Adherence to the use of medical therapy has been defined as the level of participation expected of an individual who has agreed to a prescribed treatment regimen ( 1 ). It is essential for patients with chronic medical conditions to adhere to prescribed regimens. Lack of an adequate adherence to the use of medical therapy can aggravate the disease course, and consequently, a low response to appropriate medical therapies ( 2 ). Researchers have estimated the percentage of nonadherence to the use of medical therapies in chronic medical conditions to be approximately 3050% of patients ( 3 , 4 ). Improving adherence to therapies of chronic medical conditions is an essential strategy in combating chronic diseases. Adequate adherence to the use of medical therapies is likely to minimize, delay or eliminate the morbidity and mortalities associated with chronic diseases ( 5 , 6 ). Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common chronic disease. Adherence to needed drug regimens is important for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Inadequate adherence to the use of medical therapies results in poor glycemic control and thus increase the rate of mortality and morbidity ( 7 , 8 ) and high hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) values ( 6 , 9 ). To minimize the consequences of inadequate treatment of type 2 diabetes, researchers should focus on studies that promote adherence to the use of medical therapies. This research study employed the quantitative methodology. The researcher employed the cross-sectional correlational design to investigate whether attitudes and intentions could predict adherence to oral antihyperglycemic regimens in African Americans. The independent or the predictive variables for this st Continue reading >>

Adherence To Long-term Therapies - Evidence For Action: Section Iii - Disease-specific Reviews: Chapter X - Diabetes: 4. Prevalence Of Adherence To Recommendations For Diabetes Treatment

Adherence To Long-term Therapies - Evidence For Action: Section Iii - Disease-specific Reviews: Chapter X - Diabetes: 4. Prevalence Of Adherence To Recommendations For Diabetes Treatment

4. Prevalence of adherence to recommendations for diabetes treatment 4. Prevalence of adherence to recommendations for diabetes treatment From the study of adherence to treatments for diabetes, it is apparently important to assess the level of adherence to each component of the treatment regimen independently (i.e. self-monitoring of blood glucose, administration of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic agents, diet, physical activity, foot care and other self-care practices) instead of using a single measure to assess adherence to the overall treatment. This is because there appears to be little correlation between adherence to the separate self-care behaviours, suggesting that adherence is not a unidimensional construct (21,30). This finding has been reported for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (31). Furthermore, there appear to be different relationships between adherence and metabolic control for persons with different types of diabetes (32). Consequently, the following section on adherence rates has been organized to reflect these two issues. First there is a discussion of adherence to each element of the regimen; this is followed by an analysis of adherence by diabetes type. A. Adherence to treatment for type 1 diabetes Self-monitoring of glucose. The extent of adherence to prescribed self-monitoring of glucose levels in blood varies widely, depending on the frequency or aspect assessed in the study. For example, in a sample of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (33), only 26% of study participants reported monitoring glucose levels as recommended (3 - 4 times daily), compared to approximately 40% of the adults with type 1 diabetes (34). Similar findings were reported in a Finnish study (n = 213; patients aged 17 - 65 years), in which 20% of the study particip Continue reading >>

Adherence To Therapies In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Adherence To Therapies In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing globally and has become a major public health problem. In the USA, a study of 17,306 people over 20 years of age showed that those diagnosed with diabetes increased significantly from 6.5% in the 1999–2002 period to 7.8% in 2003–2006 [1]. In 2011, 366 million people worldwide had diabetes and it is predicted that by 2030, this figure will be 552 million [2]. Diabetes is currently among the top five causes of death in most high-income countries and resulted in 4.6 million deaths globally in 2011. The majority of cases of diabetes mellitus are type 2, and the greatest numbers of people with this disease are aged from 40 to 59 years [2]. The increase in type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity, hypertension, and an increasingly elderly population. Over the last 18 years in the USA, the proportion of adults in the age group 40–74 years with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 has increased from 28% to 36%, while the proportion undergoing physical activity 12 times a month or more has decreased from 53% to 43%, exacerbating the obesity problem [3]. However, despite strong clinical recommendations for individuals with a history of diabetes to adopt a healthier lifestyle, adherence to improved diet and exercise is poor [3]. Although type 2 diabetes usually occurs in people over the age of 40 years, it is becoming increasingly common in children, adolescents and young adults due to reduced physical activity and unhealthy eating patterns, leading to obesity [4]. The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes fail to control glycemia with diet and exercise and require pharmacotherapy—in general, initially monotherapy with an oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA); however, owing to the progressive nature of t Continue reading >>

Five Reasons Diabetic Patients Dont Adhere

Five Reasons Diabetic Patients Dont Adhere

Five reasons diabetic patients dont adhere Diabetes is a silent diseasemost of these patients feel fine, even if their sugar levels are dangerously high. Because they dont feel ill, many diabetic patients arent motivated to change their lifestyles or follow prescribed medical treatment. In fact, as few as 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes take prescribed medications, according to a study in the American Journal of Managed Care. Another study, in Diabetes Therapy, showed that less than 50% of diabetic patients achieve recommended glycemic goals. Furthermore, direct risk reduction for diabetes-related kidney disease, stroke, heart disease, and amputation were estimated for 100% compliance with diabetes treatment , as reported in a study in Innovations in Pharmacy. Risk, case, and yearly cost reduction calculated for 100% compliance with diabetes treatment were 13.6%, 0.9 million, and $9.3 billion, respectively. Given this, its obvious that adhering to treatment protocols can significantly benefit diabetes patients. So how can providerswho are ultimately responsible for motivating patients to improve complianceachieve the goal of better compliance among diabetic patients? Here, experts offer solutions for some common noncompliance issues. #1. Failure to adhere to treatment recommendations First and foremost, patients need to understand how the long-term implications of not taking care of their diabetes. Educating patients and their families about what diabetes does to the body, and how medication counters those effects, is critical to inciting behavior change, says Diana OKeefe, RN, CDTC, CDE, clinical coordinator, Diabetes and Endocrine Institute, Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, New Jersey. Serge Jabbour, MD, FACP, FACE, professor of medicine and director, Divi Continue reading >>

Frontiers | Medications Adherence And Associated Factors Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In The Gaza Strip, Palestine | Endocrinology

Frontiers | Medications Adherence And Associated Factors Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In The Gaza Strip, Palestine | Endocrinology

Front. Endocrinol., 09 June 2017 | Medications Adherence and Associated Factors among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the Gaza Strip, Palestine 1Department of Health Management and Economics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences International campus, Tehran, Iran 2Quality Improvement and Infection Control Office, Shifa Medical Complex, Gaza Strip, Palestine 3Directorate General of International Cooperation, Ministry of Health, Gaza Strip, Palestine 4Director of Chronic Diseases Department, Al Rimal Martyrs Health Center, Ministry of Health, Gaza Strip, Palestine 5Department of Research, Directorate General of Human Resources Development, Ministry of Health, Gaza Strip, Palestine Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the adherence to anti-diabetic medications among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) seeking medical care in the Gaza Strip, Palestine. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 369 primary care patients with type 2 DM from October to December 2016. Adherence to medications was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-4). Socio-demographic and clinical variables, providerpatient relationship, health literacy, and health belief were examined for each patient. Univariate, binary logistic regression and multiple linear regression were applied to determine the independent factors influencing adherence to anti-diabetic medications using SPSS version 22. Results: Of all the respondents, 214 (58%), 146 (39.5%), and nine (2.5%) had high (MMAS score = 0), medium (MMAS score = 1 + 2), and low (MMAS score 3) adherence to anti-diabetic medications, respectively. Factors that were independently associated with adherence to anti-diabetic medications were as follows: female gender [odds ratio ( Continue reading >>

Medication Adherence Among Type 2 Diabetes Ambulatory Patients In Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Medication Adherence Among Type 2 Diabetes Ambulatory Patients In Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Globally, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is increasing and has become one of the major public health problems [ 1 ]. Such rapid increases in prevalence are a great cause for concern. This rise also is associated with economic development, ageing populations, increasing urbanization, dietary changes, reduced physical activity, and changes in other lifestyle patterns [ 2 , 3 ]. Many patients, especially patients with chronic illness, including, diabetes experience difficulties in following treatment recommendations. Even in developed countries, adherence to longterm therapy for chronic illnesses in averages only 50%. The result is due to Non adherence to their medication, that is to say patients do not receive the full benefit from their drug therapy. Partial treatment can direct to increased use of public health care services (acute care and hospitalizations), reduction in patients quality of life, and increased health care resources (the money that they will spend for their drug and hospital) [ 4 ]. Poor adherence to diabetes treatment is common problem which causes severe health complications and increased mortality. This is reflected for instance by an increase in the risk of cardiovascular diseases, neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, and hospitalization rates; if the problem becomes sever, it can even lead to death. It has been recognized that Poor adherence, as one of the principal cause of development of complications in diabetes [ 5 ]. Adherence rates are usually reduced for patients with chronic conditions such as T2DM than those with acute conditions; this is associated with the long-term nature of chronic diseases because the decline in adherence is most rapid after the first 6 months of therapy [ 6 ]. When conditions are treated suboptim Continue reading >>

Medication Adherence And Determinants Of Non-adherence Among South Indian Diabetes Patients Medi Rk, Mateti Uv, Kanduri Kr, Konda Ss - J Soc Health Diabetes

Medication Adherence And Determinants Of Non-adherence Among South Indian Diabetes Patients Medi Rk, Mateti Uv, Kanduri Kr, Konda Ss - J Soc Health Diabetes

Objectives: The objective of the study is to determine the adherence and determinants of non-adherence among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observation study was conducted for a period of six months in both inpatients and outpatients of diabetic clinic at a super speciality hospital. The structured medication adherence questionnaire (MAQ) was administered to the eligible diabetic patients to assess the adherence rate and determinants of non-adherence. Results: During the study period, a total of 140 patients were enrolled. Out of 140 patients, most of them were females (n = 79, 56.57%), than males (n = 61, 43.57%). Among them (n = 49, 35%) patients were in the age group greater than or equal to 61 years followed by (n = 42, 30%) patients between 51-60 years and others. The overall medication adherence rate was found to be 47.85%. The main factors for non-adherence were lack of finance (n = 43, 55.84%), forgetfulness (n = 36, 46.75%), being busy (n = 34, 44.15%), medicines inaccessibility (n = 15, 19.48%) and others. Conclusion: The overall medication adherence rate was found to be unsatisfactory. The main challenging factors affecting medication adherence were lack of finance, forgetfulness, being busy, medicines inaccessibility and side effects of drugs. Keywords:Adherence, determinants, diabetes, India Medi RK, Mateti UV, Kanduri KR, Konda SS. Medication adherence and determinants of non-adherence among south Indian diabetes patients. J Soc Health Diabetes 2015;3:48-51 Medi RK, Mateti UV, Kanduri KR, Konda SS. Medication adherence and determinants of non-adherence among south Indian diabetes patients. J Soc Health Diabetes [serial online] 2015 [cited2018 Mar 28];3:48-51. Available from: Medication adherence is a leading issue and a huge b Continue reading >>

Improving Adherence In The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Improving Adherence In The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Improving Adherence in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes US Pharm. 2010;36(4)(Compliance & Adherence suppl):11-15. Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, MD, has often been cited for making the obvious but very poignant statement: Drugs dont work in patients that dont take them.1 There is a lot of wisdom in this remark that health care providers would do well to recognize and consider when choosing medications for their patients. While this statement was directed at pharmacotherapy in general, it is more likely to be a problem with the management of chronic disease, and may be at its worst, with the management of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic, often silent condition that co-exists with a myriad of other medical problems. Hence, the patient may be taking multiple medications to treat several conditions such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. This creates a complex situation that is likely to result in low adherence to the medication plan. It seems reasonable that the provider could employ some technique or method in this population that would uniformly enhance adherence. Unfortunately, a recent scientific analysis of interventions to enhance patient adherence to medication prescriptions concluded that current methods of improving medication adherence for chronic health problems are mostly complex, labor-intensive, and not predictably effective.2 Still, even though no single method is predictably effective, there are methods that have been successful and clearly some common-sense tactics that can be applied, particularly when choosing medications to manage hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. This article will provide a succinct overview of the problem of nonadherence, an appraisal of its impact on the management of diabetes, and a common Continue reading >>

Poor Medication Adherence In Type 2 Diabetes: Recognizing The Scope Of The Problem And Its Key Contributors

Poor Medication Adherence In Type 2 Diabetes: Recognizing The Scope Of The Problem And Its Key Contributors

Poor medication adherence in type 2 diabetes: recognizing the scope of the problem and its key contributors We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Poor medication adherence in type 2 diabetes: recognizing the scope of the problem and its key contributors At least 45% of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) fail to achieve adequate glycemic control (HbA1c <7%). One of the major contributing factors is poor medication adherence. Poor medication adherence in T2D is well documented to be very common and is associated with inadequate glycemic control; increased morbidity and mortality; and increased costs of outpatient care, emergency room visits, hospitalization, and managing complications of diabetes. Poor medication adherence is linked to key nonpatient factors (eg, lack of integrated care in many health care systems and clinical inertia among health care professionals), patient demographic factors (eg, young age, low education level, and low income level), critical patient beliefs about their medications (eg, perceived treatment inefficacy), and perceived patient burden regarding obtaining and taking their medications (eg, treatment complexity, out-of-pocket costs, and hypoglycemia). Specific barriers to medication adherence in T2D, especially those that are potentially modifiable, need to be more clearly identified; strategies that target poor adherence should focus on reducing medication burden and addressing negative m Continue reading >>

Systematic Review Of Adherence Rates By Medication Class In Type 2 Diabetes: A Study Protocol

Systematic Review Of Adherence Rates By Medication Class In Type 2 Diabetes: A Study Protocol

Abstract Introduction Treatment options for type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly complex with people often prescribed multiple medications, and may include both oral and injectable therapies. There is ongoing debate about which drug classes provide the optimum second-line and third-line treatment options. In the real world, patient adherence and persistence determines medication effectiveness. A better understanding of adherence may help inform the choice of second-line and third-line drug classes. Methods and analysis This systematic review will compare adherence and persistence rates across the different classes of medication available to people with type 2 diabetes. It will include all identified studies comparing medication adherence or persistence between two or more glucose-lowering medications in people with type 2 diabetes. Research databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, The Register of Controlled Trials, PsychINFO and CINAHL) will be searched for relevant articles, using a comprehensive search strategy. All identified medication trials and observational studies will be included which compare adherence or persistence across classes of diabetes medication. The characteristics and outcomes of all the included studies will be reported along with a study quality grade, assessed using the Cochrane Risk Assessment Tool. The quality of adjustment for confounders of adherence or persistence will be reported for each study. Where multiple (n ≥3) studies provide compare adherence or persistence across the same 2 medication classes, a meta-analysis will be performed. Ethics and dissemination No ethics approval is required. This review and meta-analysis (where possible) will provide important information on the relative patient adherence and persistence, w Continue reading >>

Medication Adherence And Improved Outcomes Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Medication Adherence And Improved Outcomes Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Sarah E. Curtis, MPH; Kristina S. Boye, PhD; Maureen J. Lage, PhD; and Luis-Emilio Garcia-Perez, MD, PhD Adherence to glucose-lowering agents was associated with a significant reduction in use of acute care resources without any increased total medical costs. ABSTRACT Objectives: Examine the association between adherence to glucose-lowering agents (GLAs) and patient outcomes in an adult type 2 diabetes (T2D) population. Methods: Truven’s Commercial Claims and Encounters database supplied data from July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2014. Patients 18 to 64 years with T2D were included if they received a GLA from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011. Multivariable analyses examined the relationships among 3-year patient outcomes and adherence, defined as proportion of days covered 80% or more. Outcomes included all-cause medical costs, acute care resource utilization, and acute complications. Results: Although there was no statistically significant difference in total costs when comparing adherent and nonadherent patients ($38,633 vs $38,357; P = .0720), acute care costs ($12,153 vs $8233; P <.0001) and outpatient costs ($16,964 vs $15,457; P <.0001) were significantly lower for adherent patients. Adherence was also associated with a lower probability of hospitalization (22.71% vs 17.65%; P <.0001) and emergency department (ED) visits (45.61% vs 38.47%; P <.0001), fewer hospitalizations (0.40 vs 0.27; P <.0001) and ED visits (1.23 vs 0.83; P <.0001), and a shorter hospital length of stay (2.16 vs 1.25 days; P <.0001). Adherent patients were also less likely to be diagnosed with an acute complication in the 3-year post period (12.54% vs 9.64%; P <.0001). Conclusions: Compared with nonadherence, adherence to GLAs among patients with T2D was associated with a significant reduction i Continue reading >>

Improving Diabetes Medication Adherence: Successful, Scalable Interventions

Improving Diabetes Medication Adherence: Successful, Scalable Interventions

Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA 4Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 5Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA 4Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA 5Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 6CVS Caremark Corporation, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA 8Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA 9North Carolina Community Care Networks, Raleigh, NC, USA 10Pfizer, In Continue reading >>

Assessment Of Medication Adherence Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients In Quetta City, Pakistan

Assessment Of Medication Adherence Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients In Quetta City, Pakistan

Assessment of medication adherence among type 2 diabetic patients in Quetta city, Pakistan Accepted author version posted online: 08 May 2017 Get access/doi/full/10.1080/00325481.2017.1328251?needAccess=true Objectives: Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a growing burden among all countries including Pakistan, with medication adherence very important to improve care. However, little is known about medication adherence in Pakistan and potential predictors among T2DM patients to provide future guidance. This needs to be addressed. Consequently, the present study sought to assess medication adherence among type 2 diabetic patients in Quetta city, Pakistan. Methods: Questionnaire based, descriptive study among 300 Pakistani patients attending public and private hospitals aged 18years and above, having a confirmed diagnosis of T2DM, without additional co-morbidities were targeted. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic and disease characteristics. The association between socio-demographic data and study variables was compared through the Mann Whitney/Kruskal Wallis test (where applicable). The factors that were significantly associated with medication adherence were further assessed by logistic regression analysis. Results: 55.6% of patients had high adherence although overall patients reported moderate adherence. Age, gender, education, diabetes-related knowledge and treatment satisfaction were significantly associated with medication adherence. Older males with only primary education and with poor diabetes-related knowledge had the lowest adherence. Conclusions: This study presents a model that is associated with medication adherence among T2DM patients, with disease-related knowledge as a significant predictor of likely adherence. Results of the current study re Continue reading >>

Factors Associated With Adherence To Treatment Of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Factors Associated With Adherence To Treatment Of Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

OBJECTIVE: Investigating the association between adherence to treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and socio-demographic, clinical and metabolic control variables. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 423 patients with diabetes mellitus. The Fisher's exact test and logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between adherence to treatment and the studied variables. RESULTS: There was no association between adherence to treatment of T2DM and socio-demographic and clinical variables. It was found that total cholesterol and HbA1c were significantly associated with adherence to diet (p = 0.036) and exercise (p = 0.006). CONCLUSION: The chance of a patient with cholesterol within the recommended level adhering to diet is almost five times the chance of the patient in poor lipid control. The chance of patients with poor glycemic control adhering to exercise is almost twice the chance of those who keep adequate glycemic control. Keywords: Medication adherence; Diabetes mellitus/nursing; Nursing care; Primary care nursing Diabetes mellitus is a challenge for patients, their families and health professionals when it comes to achieving good glycemic and metabolic control in order to minimize complications in the short and long term. Behavioral changes and medication adherence are essential for preventing acute and chronic complications. Professionals must negotiate priorities, monitor adherence, encourage participation and enhance patients efforts in managing self-care.(1) Even when there are behavioral changes and medication adherence, maintaining metabolic control for a long time is difficult because it depends on a variety of complex components that involve the treatment of diabetes.(2,3) Non-adherence to treatment of diabetes mellitus is an issue know Continue reading >>

Improving Adherence To Medication In Adults With Diabetes In The United Arab Emirates

Improving Adherence To Medication In Adults With Diabetes In The United Arab Emirates

Improving adherence to medication in adults with diabetes in the United Arab Emirates Diabetes is a chronic medical condition and adherence to medication in diabetes is important. Improving medication adherence in adults with diabetes would help prevent the chronic complications associated with diabetes. A case control trial was used to study the effects of an educational session on medication adherence among adults with diabetes as measured by the Morisky Medication adherence scale (MMAS-8). The study took place at the Dubai Police Health Centre between February 2015 and November 2015. Questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic, clinical and disease related variables and the primary measure of outcome was adherence levels as measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). The intervention group involved a standardized thirty minute educational session focusing on the importance of adherence to medication. The change in MMAS-8 was measured at 6months. Four hundred and forty six patients were enrolled. Mean age 61year +/ 11. 48.4% were male. The mean time since diagnosis of diabetes was 3.2years (Range 115 years). At baseline two hundred and eighty eight (64.6%) patients were considered non-adherent (MMAS-8 adherence score < 6) while 118 (26.5%) and 40 (9.0%) had low adherence (MMAS-8 adherence score < 6) and medium adherence (MMAS-8 adherence scores of 6 to 7) to their medication respectively. The percentage of patients scoring low adherence MMAS-8 scores in the interventional group dropped from 64.60% at baseline to 44.80% at 6-months (p = 0.01). There was no obvious change in the adherence scores at baseline and at 6-months in the control group. Based on the study data, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that at 6months, the educational 30-m Continue reading >>

More in diabetes