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Diabetes Medical Specialist

Diabetes Specialist - Bay Area Tracy, Ca: Advanced Aesthetics, Adapa And Agastya Medical Associates: Cosmetics

Diabetes Specialist - Bay Area Tracy, Ca: Advanced Aesthetics, Adapa And Agastya Medical Associates: Cosmetics

Advanced Aesthetics, Adapa and Agastya Medical Associates Cosmetics Specialists & General Medical Practice located in Bay Area, Tracy, CA Dr. Gautami Agastya and the staff of Advanced Aesthetics, Adapa and Agastya Medical Associates serve California residents who live in Tracy, California and the surrounding Bay Area. The doctor specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes and many other chronic health conditions. Advanced Aesthetics, Adapa and Agastya Medical Associates Doctors are unsure of what causes the body to not recognize or be able to produce sufficient amounts of insulin. What is known, however, is that if a person has close family members that have been diagnosed with diabetes, their risk of a diagnosis is much higher. Injuries to the pancreas, an illness that affects how the pancreas functions, or how the hormones in the body are used, may also increase a person's risk of diabetes. Someone who consumes an excessive amount of sugar can also be at risk of receiving a diabetes diagnosis. At a person's yearly checkup, the doctor may be able to identify potential problems that may indicate pre-diabetes. If this occurs steps may be taken to help lower the patient's risk. Individuals who are diagnosed with diabetes later in life may be able to control their diabetes by modifying their lifestyle. If a person's diabetes is not easily controlled with oral medications, changing a person's diet may be able to help. Eliminating sugary foods and replacing them with healthier foods is the first step. It is also important to remove foods that are full of additives and preservatives. Additives and preservatives can cause the digestive system to become sluggish and weak. This inhibits the body's ability to absorb nutrients properly and can actually affect how the b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Specialist - Waipahu, Hi: James K. Okamoto, Md: Family Medicine: Ka Wai Ola Family Medical Clinic

Diabetes Specialist - Waipahu, Hi: James K. Okamoto, Md: Family Medicine: Ka Wai Ola Family Medical Clinic

More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, and a quarter of them dont know they have it. On top of that, more than 1 in 3 adults have prediabetes, yet 90% arent aware of the risk they face. Dr. James Okamoto at Ka Wai Ola Family Medical Clinic raises awareness and protects the health of those living in and around Waipahu, Hawaii by offering diabetes education, weight management, dietary and nutritional support, and medical treatment to patients with all types of diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the body doesnt make enough insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in childhood, but it can develop any time during young adulthood. Its symptoms usually appear quickly over several weeks, so youll likely notice the changes in your child. With Type 2 diabetes, the body makes some insulin, but doesnt use it properly. Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in adults and may not have any symptoms, or the symptoms may be hard to recognize because they develop slowly over the years. When you have diabetes, your blood sugar is too high. Over time, high blood sugar causes heart disease and damages the nerves, feet, eyes, and kidneys, so its important to get treatment as early as possible to lower the risk of these complications. Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet If you have a family history of type 1 diabetes, you and your children are more likely to develop the disease. With type 2 diabetes, the risk increases as people age and in those who are overweight and inactive. Your chance of developing type 2 diabetes is higher if youre overweight or have other health conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or polycystic ovary syndrome. How does Dr. Okamoto help patients with diabetes? The first step is to check blood sugar levels. Since there are seve Continue reading >>

Diabetes Specialist - San Marcos, Tx: San Marcos Family Medicine: Family Physician

Diabetes Specialist - San Marcos, Tx: San Marcos Family Medicine: Family Physician

Family Physicians located in San Marcos, TX Diabetes is a disease that affects 13-14 million people in the US. Managing diabetes requires a partnership with a doctor that patients can trust to keep their blood sugar stable and their symptoms under control. The Central Texas doctors at San Marcos Family Medicine are experienced in diabetes treatment and management, and they're ready to partner with San Marcos, Texas patients to take control over their blood sugar and diabetes symptoms. "All of the staff is pretty friendly and I love my doctor, Dr. Richard Laue." Diabetes is a disease that affects the body's ability to produce or respond to a hormone called insulin. This can create an imbalance in the levels of glucose in the blood and urine, which leads to a number of health concerns. Insulin is a hormone that breaks down the sugars and carbs in the foods people eat, turning it into glucose, which travels through the body to fuel the body's different systems. Diabetes falls into one of two categories: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is often called juvenile diabetes because it tends to affect children or young adults, but it can affect adults as well. In this form, the body stops producing insulin. Without insulin, glucose can't be used by the cells of the body and builds up in the blood. High blood sugar levels can cause damage to the body, and the cells being starved of glucose also causes damage. Type 2 diabetes prevents the body from using insulin properly, creating a condition called insulin resistance. If the pancreas can't make enough insulin to compensate for the insulin resistance, the body struggles to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. This is the more common type of diabetes. Many people don't notice symptoms of diabetes at first. Over time, they get Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Specialists

Diabetes Management Specialists

Managing diabetes is vital for remaining active and in good health. The efficiency with which your body regulates blood glucose levels will determine the overall health and wellbeing of every part of your body. At Montes Medical Group, the healthcare providers on staff offer effective solutions for diabetic management. If you live in the East Los Angeles, Whittier, Inglewood, or Norwalk areas of California, our staff encourages to take control of your diabetes: Make an appointment with one of our physicians today to learn how to effectively manage your diabetes and live a higher quality of life. Regular exercise or moderate levels of physical activity Knowledge of the disease and the medications used to treat it Ability to accurately measure and consume/inject the proper dose If you've been diagnosed with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, you must learn to effectively manage your condition if you want to experience optimum health and proper body functions. Is insulin the only way to manage diabetes? Diabetes management goes far beyond simply using insulin. Your diet is one of the most important factors in your care plan and must be carefully monitored and regulated. The foods you consume help create the calories and fuel your body needs to survive. Different types of food are utilized in different ways and are broken down at varying rates. Simple carbohydrates are broken down quickly and provide a flood of glucose to the bloodstream which results in a quick burst of energy. Complex carbohydrates, like whole grains, break down slowly and provide sustained levels of glucose. That produces sufficient energy levels that help you function throughout the day. The healthcare providers at Montes Medical Group are available to help you fine tune your diet and ensure you get the Continue reading >>

Should I See A Diabetes Specialist?

Should I See A Diabetes Specialist?

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when I was in the hospital recently with pneumonia. My regular doctor has run several tests because of the diabetes, including a stress test, ultrasounds, and blood work. But he usually doesn't talk to me about diabetes. He asks me how my blood glucose readings are going, and that's about it. I've been seeing this doctor for nearly 12 years now, but do you think I should find someone who deals mostly with diabetes? — Robert, Alabama Before changing a doctor you have known for 12 years, ask him for a better explanation of your condition and how you can manage it. There is also quite a bit of information about diabetes on Web sites such as EverydayHealth.com. Start educating yourself by investigating in the Everyday Health Type 2 Diabetes Center. Then ask your doctor for specific advice about your diabetes during your next visit. For the most part, diabetes is managed by primary care doctors. Having said that, diabetes specialists can play a significant role in your care as well. If you develop complications or have difficulty managing your diabetes, you will benefit from a specialist's advice, but such treatment is usually not an either/or situation: Primary care doctors often coordinate care among various specialists, including diabetes specialists, for their patients. Receiving comprehensive care that includes nutrition and exercise advice is key to successfully preventing potential complications. Unfortunately, patient education often gets short shrift in today's hurried medical environment. Don't hesitate to seek the information you need, whether you ask your doctor directly or search for it online. Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your health care team helps you manage your diabetes and maintain your good health. According to the American Diabetes Association, your diabetes care team should include: You: You are the most important member of your diabetes care team! Only you know how you feel. Your diabetes care team will depend on you to talk to them honestly and supply information about your body. Monitoring your blood sugar tells your doctors whether your current treatment is controlling your diabetes well. By checking your blood sugar levels, you can also prevent or reduce the episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) you have. Primary doctor: Your primary care doctor is who you see for general checkups and when you get sick. This person is usually an internist or family medicine doctor who has experience treating people with diabetes, too. Because your primary care doctor is your main source of care, he or she will most likely head up your diabetes care team. Endocrinologist: An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes. You should see yours regularly. Dietitian: A registered dietitian (RD) is trained in the field of nutrition. Food is a key part of your diabetes treatment, so yours will help you figure out your food needs based on your weight, lifestyle, medication, and other health goals (like lowering blood fat levels or blood pressure). Nurse educator: A diabetes educator or diabetes nurse practitioner is a registered nurse (RN) with special training and background in caring for and teaching people with diabetes. Nurse educators often help you with the day-to-day aspects of living with diabetes. Eye doctor: Either an ophthalmologist (a doctor who can treat eye problems both medically and surgically) or an optometrist (someone who Continue reading >>

Cookiewall - Diabeter : Type One Diabetes Care

Cookiewall - Diabeter : Type One Diabetes Care

Many websites use cookies to improve the ease of use on the website. Thus, cookies ensure that a website "remembers" your preferences during your visit to the site or on repeated visits to the site. Cookies can be used in different ways. Diabeter uses cookies to allow you to efficiently navigate between different pages, to save your user preferences and interests so that we can offer our communication as customized as possible. Cookies ensure that the interaction between you and the website is faster and easier.Without the use of cookies, every time you go to a new page of the site, the website will see you as a new visitor. Our cookies are simple files that your browser stores on your computer when you visit the site. A cookie contains the information that the website wants to know on a subsequent visit. Only the website that places a cookie can read the information of that cookie. We can and will never use cookies to pass on information to third parties or to have advertisements appear on other sites. What happens if you do not accept cookies? Let us begin by saying that cookies are harmless and that you can delete them at any time. In order to comply with European and Dutch legislation and to enable the Diabeter website to function optimally, we have chosen to make this website accessible only if you accept cookies. More about the different cookies and other measurement techniques Functional cookies are necessary for the use of the website you are visiting, for example to recognize that you are the same user who visited the previous page on the site, or to remember your preferences. Performance cookies are used to measure whether a displayed page leads to, for example, answering a question or a registration. Analytical cookies are used for continuous improvement of Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Orthopedic And Sports Medicine Specialists - Annapolis, Bowie, Millersville, Md | Ortho Health Library

Type 2 Diabetes - Orthopedic And Sports Medicine Specialists - Annapolis, Bowie, Millersville, Md | Ortho Health Library

Type 2 diabetes happens when your body can't use insulin the right way. Over time, the pancreas can't make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra sugar in muscle, fat, and liver cells. Without insulin, this sugar can't get into your cells to do its work. It stays in your blood instead. Your blood sugar level then gets too high. High blood sugar can harm many parts of the body , such as the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. It can also increase your risk for other health problems (complications). Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, so that over time the body can't produce insulin at all. In type 2 diabetes, the body still makes some insulin, but it can't use it the right way. Your body doesn't respond as it should to insulin. This makes it hard for your cells to get sugar from the blood for energy. This is called insulin resistance . Your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. If you are overweight, get little or no exercise, or have type 2 diabetes in your family, you are more likely to have problems with the way insulin works in your body. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including staying at a healthy weight, making healthy food choices, and getting regular exercise. Some people don't have symptoms, especially when diabetes is diagnosed early. This is because the blood sugar level may rise so slowly that a person may not know that anything is wrong. The most common symptoms of high blood sugar include: You can get high blood sugar for many reasons, including not taking your diabetes medicines, eating more than usual (especiall Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes Doctors: Which Specialists Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that affects a person's blood sugar levels and can require various treatments. Understanding which doctors help treat diabetes can simplify the process, making it less stressful. This article helps people with diabetes to understand the key differences between the various diabetes specialists. It also covers some common guidelines to follow for visiting each of these experts, to ensure you get the most out of your treatment. Which doctors help with treating diabetes? There are a number of diabetes specialists who may be involved in treating someone with this common condition. As each of these specialists has a slightly different role, there are some key things to be aware of before seeing each one. General care physicians A general care physician will often help in the treatment of people with diabetes. Regular check-ups will usually be carried out once every 3 to 4 months. If there is anything outside their area of expertise, a general care physician will frequently send an individual to an endocrinologist first of all. Endocrinologists The most common specialists in the field of diabetes are endocrinologists. Endocrinologists specialize in the glands of the body, and the hormones that are produced from those glands. The pancreas is a gland that comes under the spotlight when managing diabetes. It produces insulin that helps regulate blood sugar. In the case of people with diabetes, insulin is either not produced or does not work properly. People with type 1 diabetes are put under the care of an endocrinologist most of the time. People with type 2 diabetes, who have fluctuating blood sugar levels, will also need to see an endocrinologist. Visiting a doctor for diabetes When visiting a doctor about diabetes for the first time, it is important tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Specialist - Phoenix, Az: Phoenix Family Medical Care: Board Certified Family Medicine

Diabetes Specialist - Phoenix, Az: Phoenix Family Medical Care: Board Certified Family Medicine

Approximately one out of every 10 Americans has diabetes. That number grows by almost one million each year. Dr. Josef Khalil and his staff at Phoenix Family Medical Care offer personalized treatment options for each of their patients who are diagnosed with prediabetes, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. If you live in or near the Phoenix area and have a family history of diabetes, Dr. Khalil and his staff encourage you to call the office or use the online booking agent to schedule an annual checkup to determine if you're at risk for diabetes. How will nutrition education help with the treatment of diabetes? Diabetes is a condition that involves the body's inability to properly utilize or regulate blood glucose levels. One of the most important ways to control and maintain proper levels of blood glucose is through diet. Dr. Khalil and his staff provide nutrition education to each patient who is diagnosed with diabetes or currently being treated for it. Nutrition education involves learning appropriate portion control, as well as what types of foods you should and should not eat. Dr. Khalil will stress the importance of eating according to a set schedule as a way to provide the body with the nutrition it needs to remain healthy and active as it continues to learn to properly regulate the glucose that is created from the foods you consume. Are diet and exercise effective treatment options for diabetes? Both diet and exercise are key factors when it comes to the control and maintenance of blood sugar levels. Your diet provides you with protein, carbohydrates, and fat--all of which play a role in how the body functions. Simple carbohydrates are converted quickly to glucose and are used almost immediately. Complex carbohydrates and proteins break do Continue reading >>

What Specialists Treat Diabetes?

What Specialists Treat Diabetes?

People with diabetes need to regularly review and revise their strategies for managing their disease, under the guidance of a variety of specialists, including: endocrinologists or diabetologists -- healthcare professionals who specialize in diabetes ophthalmologists for eye examinations podiatrists for routine foot care These professionals will monitor your diabetes and check for complications. Keeping up with regular appointments with a primary care doctor is very important with diabetes, and they can make sure that referrals are made to other specialists as needed. Endocrinologists specialize in endrocrine disorders, such as diabetes, and they can be essential in helping to fine-tune insulin and medication doses. Having yearly eye exams with an opthalmologist is also important to help catch any problems early, and often podiatrists (foot doctors) are also recommended to be seen regularly. Since diabetes is something that is largely patient-managed, getting good education about the disease is something that often gets overlooked. Many insurance plans will cover several hours of education with a diabetes educator each year. This educator is usually a nurse or a dietitian who can make sure the patient knows how and when to take their medications, check blood sugars, plan their diet, and everything else involved with staying healthy. Most primary care doctors can provide a referral to an appropriate educator. Depending on the type and severity of diabetes you have, different doctors or specialists may see you. Initially, many diabetics are seen and cared for by their primary care physician, who may be a family doctor or internal medicine doctor. If your primary care doctor feels that you need to be seen by a specialist for improved control of your diabetes, he or she wil Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Orthopedic And Sports Medicine Specialists - Annapolis, Bowie, Millersville, Md | Ortho Health Library

Type 1 Diabetes - Orthopedic And Sports Medicine Specialists - Annapolis, Bowie, Millersville, Md | Ortho Health Library

This topic covers type 1 diabetes, including information about symptoms, tests, and home treatment. For specific information about children who have type 1 diabetes, see the topic Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With the Disease . Type 1 diabetes happens when your pancreas stops making insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra energy in muscle, fat, and liver cells. Without insulin, this sugar can't get into your cells to do its work. It stays in your blood instead. And then your blood sugar level gets too high. High blood sugar can harm many parts of the body , such as the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. It can also increase your risk for other health problems (complications). Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it usually starts in children or young adults. That's why it used to be called juvenile diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is different from type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body stops making insulin. In type 2, the body can't use insulin the right way. Over time with type 2, the body doesn't make enough insulin. There isn't a cure for type 1 diabetes. But with treatment, people can live long and healthy lives. The body makes insulin in beta cells, which are in a part of the pancreas called the islet (say "EYE-let") tissue. Type 1 diabetes starts because the body destroys those beta cells. Experts don't know why this happens. Some people have a greater chance of getting type 1 diabetes because they have a parent, brother, or sister who has it. But most people with the illness don't have a family history. Other things that increase the risk of getting type 1 diabetes are being white and having islet cell antibodies in the blood. What are the symptoms of und Continue reading >>

Diabetes Specialist - Worthington, Oh: Innovative Medical Centers: Integrative & Functional Medicine

Diabetes Specialist - Worthington, Oh: Innovative Medical Centers: Integrative & Functional Medicine

Integrative & Functional Medicine & Wellness Practitioners located in Worthington, OH According to the American Diabetes Association, approximately 30.3 million Americans have diabetes. Thats nearly 10% of the population, which is a staggering statistic. Finding effective and sustainable ways to manage diabetes is critical, from the standpoint of both personal and public health. At Innovative Medical Centers, men and women from the greater Columbus, Ohio, area have access to comprehensive diabetes care. If youre ready to try a new approach to managing diabetes and improving your quality of life, schedule an appointment today using the online scheduling tool. Diabetes is a disease in which your body is unable to produce or make use of insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone manufactured by your pancreas that helps your cells make use of glucose (sugar) to produce energy. People with type 1 diabetes suffer from an immune system malfunction that prohibits the body from producing insulin. As a result, daily insulin supplementation is required to survive. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes during childhood or early adulthood. Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1 and can develop at any age. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to produce sufficient levels of insulin or have trouble making use of the insulin your body produced. Some pregnant women develop diabetes during their pregnancy. This is known as gestational diabetes, and it usually ends once the pregnancy is over. Women who have gestational diabetes carry a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. What are the health risks for people with diabetes? Diabetes prevents your body from effectively converting the glucose (sugar) in your blood into energy. That leaves excessive levels of glu Continue reading >>

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

When Should You See A Diabetes Specialist?

Many people who have diabetes also have an experienced primary care (or family practice) doctor or nurse practitioner who can help them manage their diabetes. For example, people with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes may never need to see a specialist because they can easily manage it with their primary care doctor’s help. Other people, however, might choose to see a specialist. Here are 10 reasons why you might want to see an endocrinologist or diabetes care team: 1) Your doctor recommends you have an evaluation with a specialist. After you have been diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may recommend you see a specialist to confirm the diagnosis and make sure you know your options for managing the disease. 2) Your primary care physician has not treated many diabetes patients. If your doctor has not treated many patients with diabetes or you are unsure about their treatment, you can choose to see a specialist. 3) You are having problems communicating with your doctor. If you feel your doctor is not listening to you or understanding your symptoms, you could see a specialist who will focus primarily on your diabetes. 4) You cannot find the right educational material to help you. Treatment for diabetes starts with learning to manage your diabetes. If you can’t find the right information to help you manage your diabetes, you might want to see a diabetes care team to receive diabetes education. 5) You are having complications or difficulty managing your diabetes. You should definitely see a specialist if you have developed complications. Diabetes typically causes problems with the eyes, kidney, and nerves. In addition, it can cause deformity and open sores on the feet. Diabetes complications only get worse with time, and can cause you to miss out on quality of life. In addi Continue reading >>

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